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  1. Fish Of Doom is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/14/2011 2:11pm


     Style: Karate, mostly.

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Complementing karate with kung fu

    anyone else done this? i have a bit of experience with kung fu (yang taiji and bei shaolin, and random tidbits of general CMA knowledge), and it's improved both my karate and my general MA ability a great deal. would be interested in hearing/reading about other people's experiences with this combo.
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    Posted On:
    8/14/2011 4:33pm

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'd like to hear more specifically how they're working together for you. I tried Okinawan karate (I forget the style, but my teacher was one of Tadashi Yamashita's students) for a bit after I stopped doing choy li fut, and the element that I took away was that while kung fu taught me to really twist and sink and extend into my strikes, karate taught me to only twist and sink and extend as much as necessary, which was actually something worth developing IMO.
  3. Fish Of Doom is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/14/2011 4:49pm


     Style: Karate, mostly.

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    sure!

    primarily, i have two main observations to make: one is that CMA in general tend to be a lot more sophisticated in body use (or at least in most cases have more formal theory on it than karate), while karate generally tends towards a more brutish "accelerate to the max and smash the other guy" mentality. training in both, and mingling these two idiosyncracies has allowed me to refine my body mechanics much more than i would have been able to otherwise. the other observation is that karate has much more adherence to textbook technique, sometimes to the detriment of free-flow (but not necessarily flowing motion), whereas kung fu styles seem to have a more principle-based approach. this is something that IS present in karate, but isn't found everywhere, therefore training in a very free-flowing environment such as my particular kwoon, combined with a bit of common sense, provided has allowed me to improve my mindset as regarding how to move when it's time to apply instead of train.

    besides from that, there are the everpresent comparisons between techniques that allow you to really understand both by figuring out where they differ, and why, and where they are similar and can complement each other, and the development of different skillsets (very little chin-na stuff in karate outside of goju-ryu, for example, and generally not much training on contact sensitivity), overlapping with the prior point on the sophistication of some kung fu styles, which allows you to develop things using karate principles that are extremely obvious but that in a lot of dojo no one will even know about.
  4. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/14/2011 4:54pm

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     Style: xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You need to experience more kung fu and karate.

    Also, you need to list the styles you have studied. Everything you just said is pretty much exists in both styles depending on what you study.
  5. Fish Of Doom is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/14/2011 5:02pm


     Style: Karate, mostly.

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    experience is 9 years of shito-ryu (and total training time), 2 of shotokan (around the 6-8 year mark, occasionally keep training stuff from it), 2 and a half or so in yang tai chi (a bit later than the shotokan, iirc same year), and 6 months of bei shaolin at the same kwoon, including some very minor training in other things (some techniques from CLF, one seminar introducing some bagua concepts, and a little chin na training).

    and yes, i know that both martial "roots", shall we say (umbrella terms and all that) include all of this, and that there is a massive inter-school variation even within a single lineage, but i have found each root to generally lean more towards a specific direction. in the end it's all pretty much the same thing, but focused a bit differently, but i happened to find the bits separately from different places instead of in a single package, so to speak.
    Last edited by Fish Of Doom; 8/14/2011 5:03pm at . Reason: fuck redundancy with fornication
  6. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/14/2011 5:11pm

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     Style: xingyi

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I am not talking about root in the way you just defined.

    Your general comment is not correct because it is to inclusive. Tai Chi is so different, especially Yang, that you should group CMA under that banner after making observations. There are styles such as Baji, Xingyi, and Chen Tai Chi, and Wing Chun that skew like Karate. They have very little to no Chin-Na. There forms and strikes are extremely linear and " more brutish" and "accelerate to the max and smash the other guy" mentality."
  7. Fish Of Doom is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/14/2011 5:23pm


     Style: Karate, mostly.

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    @it is fake: that is why i took the time to make my comments general instead of making them completely inclusive ;)

    you are right however in that the generalizations are pretty big, and i apologize for that. still, i am simply relaying my experiences within the places in which i have trained. i am aware of multiple examples of schools in both CMA and karate which are contrary to my statements, particularly in high-level okinawan karate (although a lot of high-level okinawan sensei have at least some exposure to CMA), and do not delude myself into thinking that "karate" is one thing and "kung fu" is another and that they are completely different, however what i have encountered so far suggests a certain leaning towards more "formalized" technical sophistication in kung fu than in karate (IME, one very rarely hears karate people talk about use of the waist or of the hip joints, for example, and the views and training methodologies i have encountered tend towards the simplistic, albeit not necessarily ineffective. in this respect, the comparison with, say, baji or xing yi are not completely accurate because these tend to be very complex systems. more accurate comparisons, as far as i am aware, would be with styles like choy lee fut, bei shaolin or hung gar, at least until the higher levels of proficiency where everything starts to homogenize).
  8. kitkatninja is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/15/2011 2:16am


     Style: TSD, Karate & Kickboxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I tried Lau gar Kung fu and then Lee Family Kung fu while I was practicing karate. It was ok, however had to give it (kung fu) up after a few weeks as I needed to concentrate on my (then) up coming grading. If I had the time and the money I would have most likely returned.

    It was funny during my first lesson of Lau gar when I kiai-ed in class :)

    -Ken

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