Thread: Teachers of Bjj

  1. #1

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    Teachers of Bjj

    Hi there, I've been on the look out for a Bjj class for a little while now.

    My question is directed at BJJ instructors here,

    1 how do you structure a basic class in BJJ?
    2 what do you do with a noob(s) ??Do you throw them in rolling straight away even though they know nothing I mean absolutley nothing about grappling. Or would you get them to watch?

    Just curious to hear your reponses

  2. #2

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    I’m not a BJJ instructor, but I’ve often had occasion to observe them in action. You know, being in BJJ classes…

    At my club, there are three levels of classes: Fundamentals (anyone can go), intermediate (white 3-stripe and above, I think), and advanced (blue belt and up). The terminology keeps changing, but that’s the gist of it. Beginners, obviously, go to fundamentals classes. Class structure is generally warm-up followed by technical instruction followed by either positional sparring or free sparring (or both).

    Beginners on their very first day are asked to sit aside and watch the sparring portion to get a sense of what it’s like. After that, they go with anyone else, though the instructor generally pairs total beginners up with more experienced people (e.g. blue belts) and asks the more senior student to go easy and provide feedback and explanation. (I tend to talk people through it, “OK, so now you’re underneath: You want to try to get back on top. I want to apply a choke—like this—or an armlock—like this—so keep your limbs tight and try to turn to face me. OK, here I can get on top into mount—see? Now, to stop that…”)

    People tend to get the very basic gist of it pretty quickly and very soon migrate to grappling other noobs. Badly, of course, but such is life.
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  3. #3

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    Depends on the gym, my first BJJ instructor allowed students to roll on their first day however it was more of a slow role to get them familiar with it. Though more often than not you don't roll until the end of the class so you do get to see a few moves and such and a few techniques to be able to use in the slow roll. Though the option is always there to sit out of it to watch and to learn.

  4. #4

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    Thanks guys.

    I was at a class there very first day. We were shown some techniques and then just to do them. I had no clue what i was doing and I was hoping for the teacher to come around but he never did.

    I was also told nothing during the rolling. It didn't help that I was normally paired with another newcomer so both of us didn't know what we were doing.

    I sat out the remainder of the rolling.

    So thanks again for the replies. I think I might go look for another place.

  5. #5
    jspeedy's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Feel free to check out another place but don't let this experience scare you off. Sometimes all you have to do is speak up a little. If you're not sure what to do ask the instructor,if you're a little shy about asking the instructor ask someone who looks like they know what they're doing. If no one is a help you might consider checking out another place.

    The same goes for rolling ask your partner to show you what to do. If they're new also, roll with someone more experienced. You may have to sit around and wait until someone more experienced is available to roll. If you can't find someone available to roll with ask a guy if next time he will roll with you and help you out. Sometimes you just have to be proactive, not everyone is paying attention to make sure you get the instruction you want. Ask for help without coming off as a complainer, if people refuse to help you find a more inviting school,

  6. #6
    jnp's Avatar
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    New students should be paired with more experienced students in my opinion. They should also have an introductory class covering mat etiquette and the basic positions. When discussing basic positions, such as mount, side mount, turtle, guard etc., the location of the position along the continuum of positional hierarchy should be clarified. For instance, being in mount is considered the position with the most offensive capabilities and is thus typically identified as the best position to be in during grappling. Conversely, being under someone else's mount is labeled as the worst position because of your reduced defensive ability.

    After that, new people should do nothing but situational drilling and rolling for a class or two. Passing the guard is a good one. New guy tries to pass his partner's guard, experienced guy defends and/or sweeps, no submissions. New guy gets top position in these drills on their first day.

    This is a good way to ease people into grappling. It's certainly better than being smashed their first class, or being paired up with another green partner. The majority of people only need one or two of these classes before they're ready to join normal classes. However, it's a good idea to pair new joins up with students who have more than a year of mat experience for the new student's first month.

  7. #7

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    @ JnP

    What you wrote is exactly what I expected from the class. I thought I'd be shown the basic positions and when rolling just asked to obtain one from another. Like start in guard and try to get mount etc.

  8. #8
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    Gabetuno's Avatar
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    I always have my students roll on the first day, assuming they're comfortable and want to try. I try to put them with an experienced person, or I take them myself, so that if they spaz nobody gets hurt.

    I do this because, at my school, there's only a beginners class and an advanced, and everyone is encouraged to do the advanced. I, myself, rolled on my very first day, and have been hooked ever since.

    Randori is necessary, mat time is key. You can't get significantly better JUST drilling, so it's always important to include live sparring in every session. That's my opinion, and that of my instructor.
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  9. #9
    WhiteShark's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Two things that could excuse a first day of class like that.
    1) It is a very small school. Possibly no one could be spared for you that day.
    2) You went to the wrong class time and the instructor let you roll anyway. Check the schedule is it possible you showed up for a more advanced class and talked the talk enough that they threw you in?

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