Page 1 of 3 123 Last
  1. #1
    IMightBeWrong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,071
    Style
    Jiu-Jitsu
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Widening striking stance for MMA: Is it really that necessary?

    I was discussing this issue with an acquaintance the other day and he taught a striking class for an MMA gym and said that traditional Muay Thai footwork "Doesn't work in the ring and doesn't work on the street" because it's not wide enough. I've heard this opinion from other instructors too, such as my old Shooto coach, and I've trained in it, but I'm not exactly sure how true the idea really is. When I think about it, plenty of professional fighters don't keep their feet ridiculously widened out, just shoulders width or a little bit further apart which is what I've learned in Muay Thai as well. Just curious what you guys think about the issue. Is it really that important to alter your striking stance when you incorporate grappling?

  2. #2
    Permalost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    13,935
    Style
    street paddleboarding
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Why the hell is a guy that runs an MMA class saying that muay thai doesn't work in the ring or street? Why does the street part even matter in an MMA class? Where does muay thai work?

  3. #3
    Diesel_tke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    4,010
    Style
    stick, pistol, rifle
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Depends on how good your sprawl is. If you are going to be defending takedowns, a wide base is good. But it is harder to set up good kicking combinations with a really wide base. So your striking may suffer a little bit. If you keep a wide base, and then make it shorter when you are going to throw kicks, you will be telegraphing it.

    Shoulder width is what most guys I train with use. But some of the wrestlers use a super wide base. They are not too fond of kicking, and are usually looking to set up takedowns.

    As long as you can sprawl well in your kickboxing stance, I wouldn't worry about it. Unless you are getting tossed on your head alot!!
    Combatives training log.

    Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

    Drum thread

    Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

  4. #4
    IMightBeWrong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,071
    Style
    Jiu-Jitsu
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    He doesn't run a whole MMA class, just a modified Muay Thai class for an MMA gym that focuses mostly on BJJ and Judo. It was just that one thing he said that didn't make much sense to me, other things we discussed he seemed to know quite well.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    17
    Style
    Shotokan Karate
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've been wondering about the answer to that question as well. My Shotokan instructor also teaches a wide stance. Being a sticking art, I'm even more perplexed.

  6. #6
    WhiteShark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    Posts
    9,168
    Style
    BJJ/Shidokan
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Shoulder width.

    Which BTW is the width most MT instructors teach. Frankly, the boxing stance is much worse than the MT stance because it is so vulnerable to leg kicks. People think the wider stance of boxing is somehow better but if you actually use a real boxing stance with the toes pointed the right direction and weight distributed correctly (for boxing) you are super vulnerable to leg kicks.

  7. #7
    IMightBeWrong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,071
    Style
    Jiu-Jitsu
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I sort of figured to begin with it should be shoulder's width, but I've been wrong before. I really only see a few fighters with a really wide base in MMA and as was said above it's usually wrestlers, although if I remember right Anderson Silva has a fairly wide base as well. I probably sound like a n00b (which I am) by picking out the stances of pro fighters, though.

  8. #8
    WhiteShark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    Posts
    9,168
    Style
    BJJ/Shidokan
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Never use Anderson Silva as an example of what to do if you are even remotely newbish. He can do whatever the **** he wants because he is a striking god. You are not.

  9. #9
    gregaquaman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Arlie Beach
    Posts
    2,922
    Style
    mma /boxing/muai thai
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    Shoulder width.

    Which BTW is the width most MT instructors teach. Frankly, the boxing stance is much worse than the MT stance because it is so vulnerable to leg kicks. People think the wider stance of boxing is somehow better but if you actually use a real boxing stance with the toes pointed the right direction and weight distributed correctly (for boxing) you are super vulnerable to leg kicks.
    I have been told boxing stance is the better way to go. But it was said more as a rule of thumb. Although in the same discussion when they were talking about a Muay thai stance they were speaking of the one with the front foot lightly on the ground or hopping(If that is the right word) looking fo the teep.

  10. #10
    Permalost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    13,935
    Style
    street paddleboarding
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    Never use Anderson Silva as an example of what to do if you are even remotely newbish. He can do whatever the **** he wants because he is a striking god. You are not.
    For example- don't use this stance:

Page 1 of 3 123 Last

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO