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  1. donoraen is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/05/2011 8:06pm


     Style: Limalama

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My dojo closed (probably should have mentioned this...) but yeah, we did padwork with mt pads, and sparring ranged from point krotty to continuous (kinda like kyokushin with pads) to kickboxing style sparring as you got more experienced.
  2. The Juggernoob is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/05/2011 8:08pm


     Style: 'Grapplin'

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thats pretty awesome. Progressive sparring is a great idea. How come the dojo closed? Up to anything new/ found a new place?
  3. HereBeADragon is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2011 1:49am


     Style: Limalama, Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I feel the need to chime in here a bit since that first video you posted Jugger is my teacher. His name is George Lugo and he was a student of the late Grandmaster Tino. The video is him showing different techniques its not sparring or drilling, just demos. His teaching style is largely drilling and partner work but that is due to limited equipment and space. His school is a small room he built onto the side of his house. So we did not do a lot of sparring in there, we did some but it was infrequent.


    What is different about Limalama and or what is Limalama?
    Well as Don said it is a sister art to Kenpo (just don't get either side started on who introduced what to who) and shares some similarities. I'd say the biggest surface difference is that Kenpo tends to be more rigid in its movements while Limalama is more fluid especially in hand movements. There are also, of course, a lot of technical differences in techniques but on surface appearance thats the clearest destinction. There are also a few different flavors of Limalama as the original students under Grandmaster Tino added their own special touches to the art. Some focused a lot on the splashing palm, this was introduced by Tiny Lefiti. Other masters would emphasis high blocks and whirling motions. Master Lugo in addition to training from an early age under Grandmaster Tino also receieved instruction from all the original masters under Grandmaster Tino as well. The use of iron palm and splashing palm are more prominent in Limalama in general compared to Kenpo.

    On the subect of iron and splashing palm that is what you are seeing when Master Lugo is doing the "slappyhands" stuff. When done full force those can do some damage and I can attest that they hurt. Each "slap" is meant as an iron palm or splashing palm strike.

    A lot of the weapon techniques are not about fighting with a stick or knife but about defending against them and taking them away. It is intended largely to be an empty handed style. There is some staff work, short stick and knife work in Limalama as well. There are also a few lua weapons that some of the masters would sometimes teach but I do not know if they were ever officially codifed into Limalama.

    What is Limalama for?
    Limalama is intended to be a self defense system. In fact its full name is Limalama, Polynesian-American Arts of Self Defense. Its techniques were intended to cause bodily harm in a hostile encounter (the days before excessive force laws) and there was little thought of restraint in techniques when they were codified by Grandmaster Tino. I've been told that in the early days Limalama did very well in tournaments and even in American Kickboxing matches but that is all before my time.


    So just to try to sum up. Limalama is based in Polynesian war arts, western boxing and some styles of Kung Fu. Its striking is something of an eclectic mix of Polynesian hand techniques, breaking techniques similar to those seen in Lua Fist, western boxing and low kicks meant to break out the knees, ankles and in some cases to dislocate the hip. Its meant for self defense but with a pre excessive force laws emphasis on grievous bodily harm.
  4. Colin is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/06/2011 1:52am

    supporting member
     Style: MT/BJJ/MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by HereBeADragon View Post
    ...Its meant for self defense but with a pre excessive force laws emphasis on grievous bodily harm.
    Just to clarify this point, does this mean that now excessive force laws ARE a reality, the training focus is different?
  5. HereBeADragon is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2011 1:59am


     Style: Limalama, Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Colin View Post
    Just to clarify this point, does this mean that now excessive force laws ARE a reality, the training focus is different?
    For me it has changed. I still teach a lot of the same techniques but I also put a lot more time into deescalation tactics and other more non-lethal applications of techniques. I also pay more attention to ground fighting than the old timers might.

    For people like Master Lugo they mostly just keep showing the same techniques but caution students to only use them if they have no other choice.

    So I guess the answer is yes and no.
  6. donoraen is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2011 3:28am


     Style: Limalama

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by The Juggernoob View Post
    Thats pretty awesome. Progressive sparring is a great idea. How come the dojo closed? Up to anything new/ found a new place?
    Money issues, and I have been doing a grab bag of stuff, primarialy bjj at my old ckd studio right now, because I am home for summer break.
  7. Colin is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/06/2011 3:36am

    supporting member
     Style: MT/BJJ/MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by donoraen View Post
    Money issues, and I have been doing a grab bag of stuff, primarialy bjj at my old ckd studio right now, because I am home for summer break.
    ckd as in choi kwang do?
  8. donoraen is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2011 3:38am


     Style: Limalama

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Colin View Post
    ckd as in choi kwang do?
    Chun Kuk Do, also doing pambuan arnis there, forgot to mention that.
  9. Colin is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/06/2011 3:40am

    supporting member
     Style: MT/BJJ/MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by donoraen View Post
    Chun Kuk Do, also doing pambuan arnis there, forgot to mention that.
    Glad you cleared that up :)
  10. Prince Vlad is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/06/2011 4:01am


     Style: BJJ n stuff

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    (I don't have sound here at work so apologies if it was covered in the video audio)

    I noticed there are a number of Bujinkan dan grade certificates and a photo of Hatsumi displayed in the OP's video. I assume that's where they get the taijutsu element from. I'm always interested in taijutsu being mixed with another style. Those particular techniques seemed to be a lot more kempo based than taijutsu, are there any that use more taijutsu or is that really the extent of it? There is one other school I know of that mixes kickboxing, BJJ, RDSD and taijutsu with a degree of success. Interested to hear more about this from anyone with experience.
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