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  1. Bugeisha is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    476

    Posted On:
    8/13/2011 8:58pm


     Style: Kyokushin

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Congratulations!
  2. Aikironin21 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    232

    Posted On:
    8/22/2011 7:39pm


     Style: Aikido, Kajukembo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokikai90 View Post
    Just try having someone who competes in Muay Thai attack you and try to throw him. Or BJJ, Judo, or any competition based sport dealing with grappling at all. If you can do all this to them then I'll accept your argument as valid, but truth be told if it doesn't work against a professional, then in my eyes it's just a bunch of tricks to bully less experienced fighters with.

    By the way, I have done the above and it wasn't pretty for me. Though I did throw the Judo guy (with a judo throw lol).
    That's where the problem lies here. I am not making or forming an argument, I am speaking from real world real time experience, with resisting convicted felons. I wouldn't expect a 5th kyu to be successful at throwing anyone who is resisting. Especially if all his Aikido experience has been inside a dojo with only compliant partners. Sure, you have played around with it, with some of your buddies who train in other styles, and were bested. That happens when you are trying dominate another, and putting too much force into your technique, to where you are no longer doing Aikido; you are in a shoving match trying to wrench on someone.

    Really, forget about trying to through your "attackers" and focus on just moving off the line and keeping your center line unified. Keep Hamni as Aikido was intended, instead of taking a traditional fighting stance like you would in TKD. As they attack, don't dance around, sink center and enter off the line. Try to get to their side and behind them. Of course you need to keep your hands extended in front of you to protect your face, head, and torso. Get to this position, first, and see how they react. If you try to just grab a limb and start twisting, you aren't doing Aikido anymore.

    Maybe in a more TKD context: You have someone punch at you, as you block step into the arm, not the punch, but the crook at the elbow with your block extended to protect your head. Punch in like a hook motion toward his face and hit him where the head of the bicep is just above the elbow crook. Step through under the arm and pivot so you are now facing the same direction as he. Your blocking hand now can grab his punching arm at the elbow, not the wrist or fist. Now you can kick his leg out from under him, hit him in the back of his ear, or wait for him to decide to turn and face you. Most likely he will almost instantly turn to face you, as most humans would rather not have someone they are fighting behind them. This is where you find out what technique you will use. Typically, I find barring the affected arm is best right after striking it and stepping through, as the typical response to this is for him to bend his arm. There he just gave you sankyo. You didn't have to try and twist his arm up for it. If he keeps it straight and tries to push into you at the arm bar, then you have nikyo. If he attempts to both push into it you and turn you can start irimi nage, or kote gaeshi.

    It won't go this clean the first few times you try this, but that's why you train. I used to have some of my neighbor kids come over once or twice a month, and we had basically a randori session in a room I converted into a home dojo. They jumped at the opportunity to get to fight one another on the mats as pretty much any high school or college kid will. Now you will say, they aren't trained fighters, and you will be correct. What this type of experience will do, is get you out of the 1,2,3 mode of performing your technique.

    People who train for self defense, don't train to fight professionals. In Aikido, we try not to fight at all. That's where the no competition aspect comes in. If you go into a confrontation thinking of beating someone, you have engaged in a competition where you can lose. If choose to merely protect yourself, instead of beat the other person, you change the dynamic of the confrontation. Isn't that some of the premise behind modern MMA. If the guy you are fighting is a better striker than you, you don't try to stand up with him. If he's better on the ground, you try to keep him standing. So why would someone want to fight, a professional fighter if they are not one. Again I assert I have not read the overwhelming accounts of rained professional fighters assaulting people at random. That point of view is based in fantasy and what-ifs.
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