View Poll Results: What do you call the person who teaches you Judo

Voters
64. You may not vote on this poll
  • He/she demands I call them 'Sensei'

    1 1.56%
  • He/she prefers I call them 'Sensei'

    12 18.75%
  • He/she demands I call them Mr/Mrs X

    0 0%
  • He/she prefers I call them Mr/Mrs X

    0 0%
  • He/she demands I call them Coach

    0 0%
  • He/she prefers I call them Coach

    7 10.94%
  • He/she demands I call them Sir/Ma'am

    0 0%
  • He/she prefers I call them Sir/Ma'am

    0 0%
  • He/she prefers I call them by their first name

    32 50.00%
  • He/she doesn't really care

    20 31.25%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: Call me Sensei

  1. #61
    NeilG's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ty5 View Post
    I think if the coach gets on the mat and actually fights and trains with his students (like my Judo coaches do), it breaks down the barriers where as the un-functional martial arts teachers can and like to keep distance more.
    Perhaps - certainly for hokey-sokey situations the whole title game is one way they keep their scam going. But for real dojos I suspect it's more just the culture. Not sure what the situation is in the UK but locally there are hardly any Japanese people doing judo - all my instructors are born in Canada and have had little Japanese contact. It's less formal as a result. For kendo in Canada, you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a Japanese person. Let me assure you that kendo teachers all walk the walk - more so than judo actually as age is less of a factor, they are still kicking students' asses into their 80s and even 90s in some cases. And we call all those old guys sensei as they do so.

    Nice thing about "sensei" - it's always appropriate, no matter how high the rank of the teacher.

  2. #62
    Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I call my Judo teacher "Eric" for three reasons:
    a) he's a hachidan that can throw me into a pretzel.
    b) his firstname is "Eric".
    C) he wants to be adressed as "Eric" all the time.

    The main problem about the word 'professor' is that normally you can hear when it's used in the latin way: profeseur (French), professore (Italian). Except with Portugees where it is also 'professor' like the English 'Professor' instead of 'professoro' (Esperanto).
    Last edited by Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs; 6/21/2011 10:01am at .
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    You know you are crazy about BJJ/Martial arts when...
    Quote Originally Posted by Humanzee
    ...your books on Kama Sutra and BJJ are interchangeable.
    Quote Originally Posted by jk55299 on Keysi Fighting Method
    It looks like this is a great fighting method if someone replaces your shampoo with superglue.
    The real deadly:

  3. #63

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "Sensei" along with first name is required at my club. Instructions were pretty clear: You get dressed, go over to the senior instructor (doesn't instruct much, very old, 9th dan) and say "Gumbawa Sensei." Then you go the head instructor (still instructs but doesn't spar, 7th dan) and say the same thing. Then you go around to the other instructors (there are a at least two or three on any given night), bow and say hi to them, addressing them as [first name] Sensei.

    I can't remember what Gumbawa means but whatever. If they want to charge me $30/month or less then I don't mind engaging in the extra formality since none of them is getting paid. It seems I'm the only respondent where the club requires the formality of the Sensei title though, which I was surprised at.

  4. #64
    solves problems with violence supporting member
    Ming Loyalist's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by watchman View Post
    I can't remember what Gumbawa means but whatever.
    i'm pretty sure you're describing the word "konbanwa" which means "good evening."

    ko こ n ん ba ば n ん wa わ

    on weekdays, my classes are in the evening, so i would say "konbanwa, sensei", but on saturday, when class is during the day, i say "konnichiwa, sensei" or "hello sensei".

    only the students who speak japanese (or who try to, as in my case) greet my sensei that way, the rest just greet him in english. but everyone greets him.
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
    "When I was a little boy, I had a sailor suit, but it didn't mean I was in the Navy." - Mtripp on the subject of a 5 year old karate black belt
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    "Seriously, who gives a **** what you or Errant think? You're Asian males, everyone just ignores you, unless you're in a krotty movie." - new2bjj

  5. #65
    Colin's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    LOL! I wondered what he meant by Gumbawa. hehe..

    (also, i thought you pronounced the ん as M not N in こんばんわ)

  6. #66
    NeilG's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The "m" and "n" sounds kind of blur - sempai/senpai, shimpan/shinpan, all the same

  7. #67

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    The "m" and "n" sounds kind of blur - sempai/senpai, shimpan/shinpan, all the same
    縞パン?!

    :WhyWithHands:

  8. #68

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    He usually tells his younger students (below the age of 15) to address him as Mr. Endicott-Davies or Mr. ED just like they would a normal teacher at school. Once you join the senior class though, he is Morgan (first name), Big M or Sensei (a lot of people seem to take a real dig calling him the latter but he doesn't really mind).

  9. #69
    Colin's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I love the name "Big M".
    That's awesome hehe, just like the milkshakes.

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