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  1. doofaloofa is online now
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    Posted On:
    5/29/2011 3:16pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Special Needs Judo

    Our club below in West Cork is in the process of trying to float some special needs Judo classes.
    Two of our trainers have been on a coarse and i am in touch with the regional Sports for Disablity bod.

    Do any of ye Judoka have any experiance in the field, and any advice to share?

    Indeed, I would be pleased to hear comment from any one, fron any style/discipline who has experiance in special needs martial arts
  2. ty5 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/29/2011 5:25pm


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    Can you clarify what you mean by special needs? As it could cover different groups of people and each group would have different needs in terms of teaching. I don't have much experience with it in the martial arts context but work in a related field with people with disabilities.
  3. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/29/2011 5:50pm

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    I've done one on one coaching with a visually impaired beginner and have worked with a guy with downs syndrome.

    My coach runs a weekly session with disabled kids in the local area.

    You need to get some serious training. Its not something you can just walk into. You need the patience of a dozen saints. Fundamentally you need an understanding of their condition and how it effects their behaviour and ability to learn.

    Its not something anyone should take on lightly and without prior preparation.
  4. doofaloofa is online now
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    Posted On:
    5/30/2011 3:19am

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    Quote Originally Posted by ty5 View Post
    Can you clarify what you mean by special needs? As it could cover different groups of people and each group would have different needs in terms of teaching. I don't have much experience with it in the martial arts context but work in a related field with people with disabilities.
    Well in this jurisdiction the field of Special Needs is a varied all encompassing term that covers all physical and intellectual disabilitys. I suppose the steriotypical image I had before I looked into the field more closly was Downs Syndrome people, but it turns out you can fight if you cant see, cant hear, have no arms and/or legs and a broad range of people with intelectual disability, ADD, Autism to name but two. I think this is a realy great concept, and is another reason why i think Judo is such a great art.
    At present I am getting the word out to see what kind of demand there is, so it is unclear exactly what group will be intrested, but I am keen to get all the care staff doing break falls and rolling around, hopefull spark even more intrest.
  5. doofaloofa is online now
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    Posted On:
    5/30/2011 3:30am

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    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    I've done one on one coaching with a visually impaired beginner and have worked with a guy with downs syndrome.

    My coach runs a weekly session with disabled kids in the local area.

    You need to get some serious training. Its not something you can just walk into. You need the patience of a dozen saints. Fundamentally you need an understanding of their condition and how it effects their behaviour and ability to learn.

    Its not something anyone should take on lightly and without prior preparation.
    Just for clarification, I am admin only, not having the tecnical knowlege to teach. We have a good coaching team, with a large junior class. The principle Special Needs trainer is a proper Gentle Man, with a impressive knowlege of the art and mellow temprement.
    My plan is to form partnerships with local authorities etc to provide best practice services to big section of my community that is so often neglected by the mainstrem of sport
    Thanks for the feed back.
  6. Prince Vlad is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/30/2011 3:50am


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    I've got a family member with a learning disability so I'm pretty behind anything like this. However, I would say that you need to be very careful especially starting out. Physical disabilities aren't really an issue, there was a blind guy on my old college judo team who had no problem pitching regular sighted people around. When you start going beyond mild ADHD or autism (mild enough for the kid to attend a regular school) then things can get very tricky. You might want to speak to someone from the local CRC for advice, those people would have the experience to tell you what to avoid and what to look out for. Perhaps you should limit it to physical issues and those with mild learning issues to start with (unless you only intend a offering a workout with breakfalls and rolls). I can imagine you will need to keep that very one on one (teacher to student). Good luck with it.
  7. doofaloofa is online now
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    Posted On:
    5/30/2011 4:04am

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    Thanks.
    Do you train with your family member?
    We are relying on the carers to know who is a suitable candidate.
    Can you define CRC?
  8. Prince Vlad is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/30/2011 4:23am


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    CRC - Central Remedial Clinic
    I don't train with her because the interest isn't there so I've no experience . Have you contacted the Special Olympics people yet? You should, judo is in there and there is a different rule set. I'm sure they could also give you loads of advice. Check this link http://www.sol2009.com/home/sports/judo.html
  9. doofaloofa is online now
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    Posted On:
    5/30/2011 4:38am

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    thanks
    Special Olympic Ireland dont offer Judo...Yet!
  10. ty5 is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/30/2011 12:58pm


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    Quote Originally Posted by doofaloofa View Post
    Well in this jurisdiction the field of Special Needs is a varied all encompassing term that covers all physical and intellectual disabilitys. I suppose the steriotypical image I had before I looked into the field more closly was Downs Syndrome people, but it turns out you can fight if you cant see, cant hear, have no arms and/or legs and a broad range of people with intelectual disability, ADD, Autism to name but two. I think this is a realy great concept, and is another reason why i think Judo is such a great art.
    At present I am getting the word out to see what kind of demand there is, so it is unclear exactly what group will be intrested, but I am keen to get all the care staff doing break falls and rolling around, hopefull spark even more intrest.
    Sounds at the moment the brush stroke is far too broad, as a person with moderate/severe Autism has a lot different needs compared to a person with Down Syndrome, and totally different to someone who has a physical disability.

    Probably would be best to decide which group you are going to provide a service to, as it is a bit insulting to people with disabities to bunch them all together into one homogeneous lump of 'special needs'. Then research the condition thoroughly first and modify the training to fit the peoples needs.

    Though I do think it is a great idea and hope it goes well, just needs to be planned properly. In theory you should be able to get support and advise from charities for people with disabilties and the local social services department, depending on how well set up they are though, as some are better than others.
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