233520 Bullies, 3656 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 9 of 9
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. jimmyeddy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Upstate
    Posts
    19

    Posted On:
    5/22/2011 8:27am


     Style: Taekwondo shotokan mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    learning karate in okinawa or japan

    Ive been wanting to do this for a while now i want to learn kyokushin uechi ryu or shotokan does anyone have any information on programs where you pay in advance and recieve living arangements and training in karate in okinawa or japan?
  2. Odacon is offline
    Odacon's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    3,627

    Posted On:
    5/22/2011 10:09am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Bits and pieces

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jimmyeddy View Post
    Ive been wanting to do this for a while now i want to learn kyokushin uechi ryu or shotokan does anyone have any information on programs where you pay in advance and recieve living arangements and training in karate in okinawa or japan?
    Why do you want to travel so far? There's a famous kyokushin dojo in new york http://www.kyokushinkarate.com/
  3. jimmyeddy is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Upstate
    Posts
    19

    Posted On:
    5/23/2011 9:49am


     Style: Taekwondo shotokan mma

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    yes but in america they dont have the live in work in dojos like in japan or okinawa i cant just move to nyc id need a job and place to live down there the places in japan and okinawa u pay before you start and live there for the amount of time u payed for
  4. Prince Vlad is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    499

    Posted On:
    5/23/2011 11:51am


     Style: BJJ n stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The only guys I knew who did uchi deshi in any style in Japan were in Yoshinkan Aikido and they found it extremely tough not only physically but also financially. If you want to experience Japan (including the nightlife and girls etc) and get the most out of training then I would suggest training in both the judo and kyokushin hombu dojos in Tokyo. You can train in each and support yourself by doing bar work and/or teaching English (forget it if you get a proper company job, you won't have the time or energy). Living in Japan is really expensive, I ended up on the breadline a few times even when I was working for an international company. It's also on of THE places to go and experience crazy nightlife. In hindsight, if I could go back I would just do judo and MMA (shooto/kakutougi) at one of the serious pro clubs but that's just because karate isn't really my scene. Kyokushin and judo would be a very powerful combination of Japanese styles though. Something worth considering.
  5. Ming Loyalist is offline
    Ming Loyalist's Avatar

    solves problems with violence

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    4,397

    Posted On:
    5/23/2011 12:04pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo, Hung Family Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    if you want to teach english there you will need a bachelor's degree at least. i think you have a romanticized idea of what training there is like. surviving in tokyo is every bit as hard as NYC, harder if you don't speak the language, and can't legally work.

    if your idea is to save up and have an extended training stay over there, how long do you really think your money will last, and what do you expect to get out of the trip?
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
    "When I was a little boy, I had a sailor suit, but it didn't mean I was in the Navy." - Mtripp on the subject of a 5 year old karate black belt
    "Without actual qualifications to be a Zen teacher, your instructor is just another roundeye raping Asian culture for a buck." - Errant108
    "Seriously, who gives a **** what you or Errant think? You're Asian males, everyone just ignores you, unless you're in a krotty movie." - new2bjj
  6. judoka_uk is offline
    judoka_uk's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    England
    Posts
    4,619

    Posted On:
    5/23/2011 4:46pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Japan is renowned as being very expensive, visas for work are very hard to come by and uchi deshi/live in dojos don't exist anymore. Its 2011 not 1645.

    If you want to do martial arts in Japan and do a close to uchi deshi experience then there's only two options:

    Yoshinkan Aikido senshusei course
    International Budo University

    That's it.

    If you're young enough/ smart enough then Tsukuba university offers unparraled opportunities for living in Japan and training MA

    In 2009, the University was chosen for internationalization through the government's Global 30 program. This program provides seed funding for the university to set up new degree programs, taught entirely in English and aimed at foreign students. Although we have no sports science or Judo degree programs in English currently, students can study degrees in either of our two undergraduate themes, or in one of our Masters and PhD programs, and train at the University Judo club in their spare time. Undergraduate students may expect to be able to train 10 to 12 hours a week.

    We offer undergraduate degrees in two overarching themes; Life and Environmental Science (Biology, agricultural science, geoscience, environmental science) and International Social Studies (Economics, Politics, Sociology, Law, International Development, International Relations).

    For undergraduate students, we waive both the university entrance fees and first year tuition fees. After which, students pay domestic fees (approx US$6,500 / year [for 3 years]), which may be considerably less than they would expect to pay either at a comparable UK or US university, or at a private university in Japan.

    For academically committed students, we have a range of scholarships available. Our 1st year Tsukuba Scholarship pays a US$1,200 travel / settling in allowance, plus either $700 (60,000 yen) or $1,200 (100,000 yen) per month for the first year (8 months). Our 2nd year Tsukuba Scholarship covers tuition fees and pays $700 per month for the full 12 months. Part time work is also possible, making studying at Tsukuba an even better deal.

    Details of our degree programs can be found on our website, and enquiries can be directed to me at irving.louis.fb@u.tsukuba.ac.jp Clubs or organizations wishing to carry a link on their website are particularly welcomed.
    http://judoforum.com/index.php?/topi...ba-university/
  7. maofas is offline
    maofas's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,975

    Posted On:
    5/23/2011 4:56pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kenkojuku Karate, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Try contacting the Ligo dojo (Kyokushin) in Durham, NC. I believe that have an uchi deshi program.
  8. Vorpal is offline
    Vorpal's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    A Hell of my own making
    Posts
    3,078

    Posted On:
    5/23/2011 6:55pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's easy to train overseas, just get the Air Force to pick up the check like I did.
  9. Prince Vlad is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    499

    Posted On:
    5/24/2011 6:54am


     Style: BJJ n stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One other thing, a holiday visa only lasts 3 months. You can apply to extend that but you will provide proof of funds to support yourself without working illegally. The alternative is to try to get a student visa (that's how I got my foot in the door) for a year before going over or a contract for a teaching job. The easiest way to get that is to do a TEFL course (you don't need a college degree) Check This Link

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.