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  1. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/16/2011 4:49pm

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     Style: Judo

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    Fundamentals of Contest Judo - Transition

    So often when we practice Judo we do each segment of the Judo match in isolation- gripping is done separately from throwing, throwing from moving, tachiwaza from newaza.


    However, in a contest we have to be able to do all of these things seamlessly being able to grip, move, throw and transition into newaza without pausing significantly in between.


    Coaches often therefore use training exercises to help people chain together the separate aspects that we usually train often in isolation. They will use drills where you break a grip, move, T-up and throw and as concerns this article they will use drills that try and replicate the transition from standing into groundwork.



    In between the application of a throw, tachiwaza, and the application of a roll, strangle, pin or armlock Ė newaza- is the transition.



    Conceptualising the transition

    As I have been taught there are two key elements to the transition they are the connection and the catch. Note that Iím not referring to throwing situations where tori attempts a throw and lands in a pin or where uke becomes tori, during the throw, and lands in a pin.


    Iím talking about situations where a throw is not applied in a controlled fashion that lands tori in a position to apply a pin.


    In these situations there are two key concepts:


    The Connection
    The Catch


    The Connection




    As Adams explains and demonstrates above after having performed a throw it is vital that tori remains in contact or connected to uke in order to place himself in the best place to then attack further in newaza.



    Tori throws uke and releases his grip on the lapel, whilst maintaining hand contatct:




    Toriís hand moves from the lapel to ukeís lat muscle and retains control and grip of ukeís sleeve


    As uke continues to roll from the throw, tori retains contact with his tsurite hand on ukeís lat muscle and his hikite hand moves to ukeís shoulder




    As tori does so he manoeuvres around and with uke so that he retains contact.

    Tori continues to stay with uke and finishes in a strong position ready to attack



    Here are some examples of tori staying to uke in a contest situation





    The Catch

    Once you have stayed connected to uke its important that youíre able to attack swiftly and purposefully.



    In order to go from being connected to uke and in a good control position to an attack you must Ďcatchí a control point.


    A catch comes in many forms and some catches can lead to many techniques and entries..



    A hook is a not the same as a catch.




    Although a hook is often an excellent precursor to establishing the catch


    The catch is a grip on the collar or arm.


    A common catch, for Judo, to start turnovers into pins and armlocks is on the collar







    Another is on the forearm





    And of course one of the most famous catches of all, in the crook of the elbow, for Adams Juji roll





    Another common catch is to send the arm to catch the collar in order to tighten it for applying a strangle.


    Tori grasps the collar slightly lower than normal





    Tori then brings in the hand that he intends to apply the shimewaza with so that two hands are on the collar




    Tori then uses the lower hand, that established the catch to tighten the jacket and thus the shimewaza



    Staying connected to uke and getting the catch demonstrated in competition





    Practicing the transition

    In my opinion practicing the transition from tachiwaza to newaza is as important as practicing the respective parts of Judo. In every competition you enter at some point you will throw imperfectly and need to know how to effectively control the transition and then attack in newaza.


    I believe the best way to practice the transition is progressively. That is to stay in a controlled and pre-determined way that builds fundamental skills and then develops them in a planned and structured way.


    First and foremost is understanding how to throw and throw with control and to understand how to apply a selection of turnovers.

    So once you know how to throw safely and in a controlled manner and have learnt a selection of turnovers you can begin practicing transition training.



    Normally the core of transition training is attacking the turtle performing uchikomi until all aspects of the attack against the turtle and well in grained





    After that itís important to practice the throw and connection





    Once accomplished at those you begin practicing the entire sequence Ė throw, connect, catch, turn, pin/submit, ippon.




    This training methodology can be refined, personalised and specified so that if a player is good at the turn in uchikomi and is good at connecting with uke in live situations, but struggles with the catch in live situations. Then the drill can be refined so that it becomes; throw, connect, catch, reset thus drilling the catch reflex to improve it.



    This training can then shift phase, all above examples are of cooperative training, but as skill, competency and fluidity increase resistance can be progressively added to the drills until finally you reach a full randori situation with a continuation into groundwork permitted.

    As always thoughts, critiques and questions are welcome.
  2. Just Guess is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/17/2011 10:07am


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    Great post as always. This is one of the things I have not practiced enough, or put a lot of time or thought into. I also have to say, holy **** Adams is fast with that turnover jujigatame!
  3. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    5/17/2011 3:12pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    "This training can then shift phase, all above examples are of cooperative training, but as skill, competency and fluidity increase resistance can be progressively added to the drills until finally you reach a full randori situation with a continuation into groundwork permitted. "

    This is true of all Judo training regardless of the skills being worked. Very well said.

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  4. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/17/2011 3:26pm

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    Cheers, Ben. Tried to cover the core points as much as possible, but still show people how to develop and personalise the drills.

    Justguess, he was even faster in contest, absolutely unreal.
  5. BKR is online now
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    5/19/2011 3:06pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    Cheers, Ben. Tried to cover the core points as much as possible, but still show people how to develop and personalise the drills.

    Justguess, he was even faster in contest, absolutely unreal.
    I've got the VHS version of his "Modern Contest Judo", plus he did a ne waza one too. Contest footage of him is as you say, unreal in terms of reaction time, speed,and accuracy in the transition. My jaw drops.

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  6. Colin is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/19/2011 7:33pm

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     Style: MT/BJJ/MMA

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    Yet another excellent judo tutorial.

    More impressive to me than how fast he can move, is that when he does move, he doesn't waste an ounce of motion or momentum.
  7. Davaro is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/20/2011 4:34am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Judo

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    As my first post ever, just want to say this was a great tutorial.

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