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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    The "ippon" in this case means simply "single", not "one point". If you wanted to explicitly say "one hand" you might say "kata-te", I don't know why that is not used instead. Perhaps because you are still using both hands but it's a kind of single point grip.

    ETA - Res beat me to it. "Ippon" is often used in counting things, for example in kendo we say "ippon-me", meaning the first kata but you might say "ippon-me" in counting other things. Japanese counting is complicated.
    Japanese counting is annoying-you need to know the counter for various objects. But its one of the few irregular-ish things about the language.

    Katate literally means "one hand". Ippon seoi nage isn't really done with one hand - it's done with one or two arms against a single arm.

    Mei is a respectful counter for people.

  2. #12

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    Cool, cheers for the explanation guys.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post

    Of course, in my dojo, seoi nage is all of the above and seoi otoshi is the "wrong" seoi otoshi. I'm not telling my pre-1982, Japanese-trained, rokudan instructor any different when he asks me to do seoi otoshi. Kashiwazaki's "Attacking Judo" uses seoi otoshi the same way, too.
    Which 'wrong' seoi otoshi? The Morote seoi nage with the leg across wrong seoi otoshi?

    Anyway I'm going off the Kodokan guidelines, but with anything there's going to be some variation.

  4. #14

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    The tai otoshi grip morote seoi nage. There was no systematic nomenclature for seoi otoshi when he learned or his instructor (Kodokan 8 dan) learned. Doesn't really matter -- at some level, te waza are te waza are te waza.

  5. #15
    judoka_uk's Avatar
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    Morote seoi nage grip, tai otoshi legs. If it was a tai otoshi grip it would just be a tai otoshi, lol.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    Morote seoi nage grip, tai otoshi legs. If it was a tai otoshi grip it would just be a tai otoshi, lol.
    I'm judo dyslexic today.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    The "ippon" in this case means simply "single", not "one point". If you wanted to explicitly say "one hand" you might say "kata-te", I don't know why that is not used instead. Perhaps because you are still using both hands but it's a kind of single point grip.

    ETA - Res beat me to it. "Ippon" is often used in counting things, for example in kendo we say "ippon-me", meaning the first kata but you might say "ippon-me" in counting other things. Japanese counting is complicated.
    Kata Te is used in Kata Te Jime (single hand strangle). A version of seoi nage (or Tai Otoshi) where you hold the sleeve and lapel on the same side is infomally "Kata Eri Seoi Nage or Tai Otoshi".

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    Kata Te is used in Kata Te Jime (single hand strangle). A version of seoi nage (or Tai Otoshi) where you hold the sleeve and lapel on the same side is infomally "Kata Eri Seoi Nage or Tai Otoshi".

    Ben
    Unless you're Neil Adams, in which case it's Yama Arashi ;(

    Great technique though.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post
    Unless you're Neil Adams, in which case it's Yama Arashi ;(

    Great technique though.
    You could call it a Yama Arashi grip if the thumb is inside.

    LOL, Neil does love the term "Yama Arashi" though, doesn't he?

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980

  10. #20
    NeilG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    You could call it a Yama Arashi grip if the thumb is inside.
    Is the thumb really required to be inside, or can you just grab a fist full of material?

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