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  1. PointyShinyBurn is offline
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    Gnarly King of Half-Guard

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    Posted On:
    10/13/2011 9:13am

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by blackmonk View Post
    Case in point: I have been trying to figure out when/how it is useful to cup both hands on your opponent's opposite arm while playing half guard, in an effort to slow or stop their guard pass. I have seen this done by many, many high-level BJJ guys, and it is something that was touched on (but not elaborated) in class. About a week ago, I was playing with it, but could not figure out the details because my training partner that day was smashing my face up pretty good at the same time. Several days later, a much calmer training partner allowed me to work through it at 50-60% speed, and now I have figured out that it is a transitory position used to create space, and not a form of guard.
    What you've figured out I don't really understand. Use the knee shield rather than just arms and place your higher hand across his throat rather than on the arm. This is a guard (and a transitory position as well) that you've got a lot of options from.
  2. blackmonk is online now
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    Welterweight

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    Posted On:
    10/13/2011 3:50pm

    supporting member
     Style: belt and jacket wrestling

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PointyShinyBurn View Post
    What you've figured out I don't really understand. Use the knee shield rather than just arms and place your higher hand across his throat rather than on the arm. This is a guard (and a transitory position as well) that you've got a lot of options from.
    I do that, too. Just talking about a specific position that I see a lot of really good guys use... I'll post a pic.
  3. jnp is offline
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    Titanium laced beauty

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    Posted On:
    12/05/2012 11:04pm

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     Style: BJJ, wrestling

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by jnp View Post
    I forgot to mention that attacking from angles, as opposed to being strictly parallel or perpendicular to your opponent's spine is the optimal setup for a successful submission attempt. I mentioned previously about attacking at an angle while in guard, but this principle applies to almost any upper body submission, whether on top or in guard, and quite a few of the lower ones.

    Even the basic ankle lock from guard can be improved if you're slightly offset relative to the line formed by your partner's spine. Armbars from on top are more effective when the arm is at a forty-five degree angle either below or above the plane formed by drawing a line between the two shoulder.

    I would further postulate that attacking from an angle being more effective than head on is one of the principles that extends across both the striking and the grappling realm.
    Wow. A bit on the expository side was I.

    Here's how I explain it these days. If you're on top in someone's guard, you want to keep them relatively parallel to your core. Anytime someone is cutting an angle on you in guard they are probably setting up an attack.

    Reverse the above if you are in the guard position. Also, try to always be on your side when in the guard. Being on your side equals hip mobility equals good guard game. Additionally, when you drill guard pulling techniques, don't fall to your back. Fall to your side. You spar like you drill.



    Control the hips of the person who is in the guard position to pass their guard as well as neutralizing their attack options. If you don't have control of their hips, go for their knees. Keep in mind that the insides of elbows and knees are much better control points than ankles or wrists, but remember, he who controls the hips, controls the game.
    Shut the hell up and train.
  4. jnp is offline
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    Titanium laced beauty

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    Posted On:
    12/06/2012 12:13am

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     Style: BJJ, wrestling

    3
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    The inside game, who is in control?

    I'd like to talk about the inside game this evening. When I say inside game, I mean who is in control of their opponent's core. Generally (but not always) the person who is in control of the space from the knees up (with regards to the legs) and above the elbows (where the arms are concerned), is controlling of the other person. I call this the inside space.


    Here's a quote from the first post in this thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by jnp View Post
    Overall, the tertiary points should be considered the least preferable points of control. All effort should be made to stay inside the primary and secondary points in order to maintain both maximum control and the ability to disrupt your opponent's skeletal alignment with the least amount of effort.
    So what does that mean? It means that I'm always looking to control the inside space. Specifically, doing so in a manner that minimizes my partner's strength by compromising their skeletal alignment.

    When my guard gets passed, I usually catch the inside of their near elbow as my partner finishes passing. My thumb is on the inside of their bicep, the other four fingers to the outside. I don't need to extend my own arm all the way to keep them from "settling in" in order to secure their position. Their shoulder is elevated, and they are unable to drop all of their weight.

    Though my guard has been passed, I have maintained some wiggle room to facilitate my escape. Although I am only partially controlling the inside space, I disrupt their own control sufficiently to create defensive opportunities.

    Parallel to this, when I'm on top in someone's guard, in side control or mount, I look to stay in control of the shoulder joints and the hips. Many times this means staying on the inside of elbows and knees.

    For example, when my opponent tries to shrimp away while I'm in side control, I typically follow their hips with my knee or foot. They try to shrimp away. The moment their hips come off the floor, my knee or foot is also off the floor and ready to stay glued to their hip. It's easier to follow the hip when you do so with the foot by the way. Less scooting like when you're on both knees, and more short stepping when your foot is attached to their hip and your other knee is down.

    They can shrimp and turn on their side all they like, as long as I stay close to that bottom hip with my foot or knee, I'm in control. They can never get their own knee between us because I know to follow their hip like a dog follows a bone. Another example of controlling the inside space.

    When I'm in guard, I frequently use my hooks (this means curled feet behind their knees usually) with my legs and my hands on the inside of their elbows in order to take away their posture and establish sufficient control for a sweep. Once again, controlling the inside space.

    When I have back control, I strive to keep one arm over their neck and inside that arm at all times. This greatly assist me in manipulating the? You guessed it, the inside space.

    Remember that overhooks and collar grip/ties can also contribute to dominating the inside.

    These are basic principles that you can use in any position. Next time you're sparring in a grappling environment, try managing the inside space.
    Shut the hell up and train.
  5. SpamN'Cheese is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/06/2012 11:48am


     Style: Karate, Boxing, BJJ noob

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks, man. I'm going to try to use these principles tomorrow.
  6. Jim_Jude is offline
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    Shime Waza Test Dummy

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    Posted On:
    12/09/2012 1:28am

    Join us... or die
     Style: StrikeyGrappling & WW2-fu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    good stuff. enjoying the thread.
    "Judo is a study of techniques with which you may kill if you wish to kill, injure if you wish to injure, subdue if you wish to subdue, and, when attacked, defend yourself" - Jigoro Kano (1889)
    ***Was this quote "taken out of context"?***

    "The judoist has no time to allow himself a margin for error, especially in a situation upon which his or another person's very life depends...."
    ~ The Secret of Judo (Jiichi Watanabe & Lindy Avakian), p.19

    "Hope is not a method... nor is enthusiasm."
    ~ Brigadier General Gordon Toney
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