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  1. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/26/2011 2:32am


     Style: Kendo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I understood his question. In type 1, the lead foot advances and the trailing foot follows. In type 2, the trailing foot advances and then the lead foot advances. For the normal movement as Ben points out, you would advance the lead foot and then the trailing foot. This means from a right-handed normal stance, the right foot moves first. This kind of motion is what we call "suri-ashi" in kendo, although as Ben explains suri-ashi simply means sliding footwork, which is what we do no matter if we're doing tsugi-ashi, ayumi-ashi, hiraki-ashi or any other kind of footwork.

    Here's another terminology difference - judoka call counters kaeshi-waza and kendoka say oji-waza. To kendoka, kaeshi-waza is a specific class of counter-techniques. I have no idea why the terminology differs.
  2. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/26/2011 11:54am

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    OK, I see what you mean now, thanks NeilG. In Judo both those are tsugi ashi.

    One point is that it's important not to focus so much on the stepping as an isolated event. Your whole body moves as your feet move. As Judoka_UK noted, "power"is from the ground up, so to speak, or some would say from the "hara",or center. Centered movment is critical in any physical activity.

    Ben
  3. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/28/2011 3:15pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, after looking around for a while, I see that Katanishi Sensei IS calling the movment he is doing tsugi ashi. It's not the basic form of moving around the mat that I am thinking of though, but if he calls it tsugi ashi, it's tsugi ashi, obviously. LOL, same for the rest of them, tsugi ashi for kouchi, seoi nage, etc. I need to work on my reading comprehension.

    Given that, the basic form of moving around the mat I described is also tsugi ashi all the same.

    This is a Nage No Kata video, it shows basic tsugi ashi pretty well. As in simple movement across the mat. The first throw, Uki Otoshi, shows basic tsugi ashi.

  4. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/28/2011 9:38pm


     Style: Kendo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the video - these guys throw aggressively for kata! Especially that ura-nage, holy crap.
  5. Ragnarok37 is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/28/2011 10:26pm


     Style: Judo, Boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    See what I mean? It causes confusion!
  6. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/29/2011 6:06am

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    Thanks for the video - these guys throw aggressively for kata! Especially that ura-nage, holy crap.
    You really think so? That performance is OK, I could not find the one I found originally by the same two guys, which was a LOT better. Some throws are better than others for sure.

    Nage No Kata is done with normal force, or at least it should be.

    Ben
  7. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/29/2011 9:17am


     Style: Kendo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I agree that some throws are better than others - I was kind of surprised to see the same non-sweep I'm currently struggling with on my own harai-goshi in their kata, for example.

    Personally I like kata done with honest throws and so that's the way I do them, so I appreciate these guys thumping the mat with some authority. However, most of the senior people around here are doing a gentler-looking version.

    That ura-nage caught my eye because he just went for it, uke was doing ukemi before tori's shoulders hit the mat.
  8. Coach Josh is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/29/2011 10:08am

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     Gladiators Academy Lafayette, LA Style: Judo, MMA, White Trash JJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just to help clear up some stuff on Japanese Judo terms and Japanese language. Most of the terminology in Judo is not conversational or "normal" language. Mainly its like technical lingo where words carry a different meaning because of the context it is being used. If that helps.

    Kendo terms (which I know little to nothing about BUT I AM STILL LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO TEACH ME) are more than likely closer to actual Japanese due to it being not as widespread as Judo. While Judo terms have remained the same since its inception due to uniformity. This is a conjecture not a fact.

    While mate is wait in Japanese we use it as stop or have been told it is stop. Yamate I believe is stop. Sadly though most of the Japanese terms we use have no meaning without being in a sentence or in such a place as a dojo where the meaning is implied. This is what my wife tells me so correct me if you got better info.
    Judo is only gentle for the guy on top.
  9. NeilG is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/29/2011 10:40am


     Style: Kendo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    No, similar to judo many of the kendo and iaido terms are technical and have little meaning to the average Japanese person. They also have been around a long time. Unlike judo though kendo doesn't have such an extensive catalog of (sometimes esoteric) technique names. We do have a lot of terms to describe conceptual things which would be meaningless or misunderstood by the average Japanese speaker.

    In the case of mate and yame however, these are normal Japanese words - in the form used in the dojo they are orders to wait or stop.
  10. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/30/2011 4:16am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilG View Post
    I agree that some throws are better than others - I was kind of surprised to see the same non-sweep I'm currently struggling with on my own harai-goshi in their kata, for example.

    Personally I like kata done with honest throws and so that's the way I do them, so I appreciate these guys thumping the mat with some authority. However, most of the senior people around here are doing a gentler-looking version.

    That ura-nage caught my eye because he just went for it, uke was doing ukemi before tori's shoulders hit the mat.
    Honest throws to me means "not jumping", jumping is common unfortunately in Nage No Kata. Amount of force can vary. If the throws are done correctly, in a way, uke does throw himself.

    Ben
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