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  1. DAYoung is offline
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    Crouching Philosopher, Hidden Philosopher

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    Posted On:
    3/09/2011 4:17pm

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     Style: n/a (ex-Karate)

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    Ben, thanks for the glossary. I didn't do Judo long enough to take in the terminology. And sometimes the English words stuck with me, e.g. scarf hold rather than kesa gatame.
    Martial Arts and Philosophy: Beating and Nothingness
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  2. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/09/2011 7:20pm

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     Style: Judo

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    Was originally going to do a combinations section in the original post, then after taking like 3 hours to do I though, screw you guys, I'm going to bed.


    Here is the combination section I would have included in the original post.


    O soto gari Combinations

    O soto gari to Sasae tsurikomi ashi

    O soto gari to Sasae tsurikomi is a classic combination for two reasons, because it utilises the action-reaction sequence which is at the heart of all good Judo and because both throw require tori to be slightly off set from uke.

    Here Katanishi demonstrates how the action reaction sequence for O soto gari to Sasae tsurikomi ashi works. Itís such a good demonstration that I donít think it needs breaking down. I have left it with the original French soundtrack for the benefit of those reading from France.



    However suffice to say that Katanishi demonstrates that toriís attacking action elicits a defensive forward reaction from uke which can then be exploited to throw them with Sasae tsurikomi ashi.

    Katanishi shows the principle well, however, its important to remember that the ability to attack meaningfully with an O soto gari and have the awareness of debana to sense ukeís reactions, react to it, take control of uke and throw him with Sasae tsurikomi ashi in randori or shiai is a very advanced skill.

    And here Yamashita shows some of the finer points of the application of the two techniques.



    Worthy of particular note is how Yamashita controls ukeís hikite elbow, bending it up and round to generate kuzushi



    O soto gari to O uchi gari

    O soto gari to O uchi gari is another classic combination.

    When advancing to attack with O soto gari



    As you attempt to reap the leg, due to imperfect debana, kuzushi and shimekomi, uke is able to step back with their leg, foiling the technique.






    However, this leaves you perfectly T-ed up with uke.


    As Yamashita demonstrates with his hands




    Seen from another angle it becomes clear







    From here it is simple to apply O uchi gari




    Of course it should remembered that this is a training drill and so the actions and reactions are somewhat contrived, however, it teaches the principle of action reaction to combine the two throws.
  3. Dave R. is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/09/2011 7:51pm


     Style: Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    And here Yamashita shows some of the finer points of the application of the two techniques.



    Worthy of particular note is how Yamashita controls uke’s hikite elbow, bending it up and round to generate kuzushi
    This is the finest demonstration of this combination I have ever seen. Of course, it's no surprise considering it's Yamashita. I've seen people try to teach this technique and every time they teach it they have done so with the reaping leg action first for o soto gari. So essentially tori tries to reap but misses and then as the leg swings back from the miss it is used for sasae tsurikomi ashi. I just don't think that's very efficient and I've never liked practicing it that way. I think the o soto gari is defended against well before the reaping action takes place so as you put it this combination is very advanced because it requires a certain feel.
  4. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/09/2011 8:55pm

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    I agree Dave. The way Yamashita shows is the way I was taught the combination. In fact my coach teaches an O soto gari - Sasae tsurikomi ashi - Okuri ashi barai using this method.

    The Katanishi method where you step in for the O soto and get the reaction that way is also a good way of doing it.

    As you say though the throw up the leg, then swing it back and try and catch the Sasae is difficult and not an easy drill. I don't recommend it as a good way of practicing the combination.
  5. simonifrius is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/14/2012 12:25am


     Style: Parkour and Judo

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    I'm having a problem with uke's arm posting to my chest, often preventing me from achieving tsukuri. I'm gripping at the elbow, and when I pull the sleeve in, uke's hand is glued to my chest in almost a wristlock, and I can't get my chest in. Can you suggest anything?

    My sensei wants me to not pull down in kuzushi for now, as I'm just beginning and he has a long game in mind that I don't know yet. However, even when I do pull the sleeve down, uke's posted hand still keeps me from getting in.

    Edit: this is specifically for o soto gari, not a tsukuri question.
    Last edited by simonifrius; 7/14/2012 12:41am at . Reason: clarifying relevance to this thread
  6. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/15/2012 3:16pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by simonifrius View Post
    I'm having a problem with uke's arm posting to my chest, often preventing me from achieving tsukuri. I'm gripping at the elbow, and when I pull the sleeve in, uke's hand is glued to my chest in almost a wristlock, and I can't get my chest in. Can you suggest anything?

    My sensei wants me to not pull down in kuzushi for now, as I'm just beginning and he has a long game in mind that I don't know yet. However, even when I do pull the sleeve down, uke's posted hand still keeps me from getting in.

    Edit: this is specifically for o soto gari, not a tsukuri question.
    In uchikomi or in randori?

    If in uchikomi are you ensuring you're off set before you start doing repetitions?

    If it is uchikomi and you are off set I'm not sure where the issue is coming from, because its almost impossible for someone to hold you out with stiff arming if you're offset, because their arms are like this:



    Human's can't keep their arms straight if you apply force when their at a diagonal angle.

    If your partner's wrist is hurting because he's trying to fight your entry and the bone structure of his arms, then he needs to stop being a muppet, to be honest.
  7. Dave R. is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/15/2012 4:39pm


     Style: Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    If your partner's wrist is hurting because he's trying to fight your entry and the bone structure of his arms, then he needs to stop being a muppet, to be honest.
    Sometimes I feel good uke's are becoming harder and harder to find. I consider myself a good uke because I understand what tori is trying to practice and achieve. When I think of all the people I've trained with over the past six years I'd say about 6 - 7 were are good uke and I know at least two of them I taught and explained what it meant to be a good uke.
  8. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/15/2012 4:47pm

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     Style: Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave R. View Post
    Sometimes I feel good uke's are becoming harder and harder to find. I consider myself a good uke because I understand what tori is trying to practice and achieve. When I think of all the people I've trained with over the past six years I'd say about 6 - 7 were are good uke and I know at least two of them I taught and explained what it meant to be a good uke.
    Good ukes are like hen's teeth. That's for sure. As a rule I've found that foreigners make the best uke's, because they've usually come from countries like France, Russia, Poland etc... where there is a solid technical base and people understand how to practice Judo.

    I imagine the US shares the same issues.
  9. simonifrius is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/15/2012 10:01pm


     Style: Parkour and Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    In uchikomi or in randori?

    If in uchikomi are you ensuring you're off set before you start doing repetitions?

    If it is uchikomi and you are off set I'm not sure where the issue is coming from, because its almost impossible for someone to hold you out with stiff arming if you're offset, because their arms are like this:



    Human's can't keep their arms straight if you apply force when their at a diagonal angle.

    If your partner's wrist is hurting because he's trying to fight your entry and the bone structure of his arms, then he needs to stop being a muppet, to be honest.
    It's in uchikomi, when I'm pulling his sleeve to me while he's holding my lapel with that hand. His hand gets stuck while I'm bringing in his elbow, so the effect would be the same as if he put his hand on my chest and I put a wristlock on him by putting my hand on the back of his elbow and applying pressure. He's not stiff arming; something I'm doing is trapping his forearm perpendicular to my chest, and this prevents me from getting chest-to-chest with him. This happens to all my partners, no matter which direction I pull. One of the black belts showed me a way around this by having me pull the arm out before I enter, then down for kuzushi, but my sensei really doesn't want me applying kuzushi in this way. Also, the fix hasn't helped us identify the problem. (I can try to get a picture or video if the problem is still unclear.)

    I will try to pay attention to my footing tomorrow and let you know if I'm offsetting my stance enough.

    Thanks.
  10. Res Judicata is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/16/2012 11:36am


     Style: Judo & BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is what the kenka-yotsu, tsugu-ashi (or "side") osoto looks like in competition. It can become very harai goshi-like:



    Here's another take on the ken-ken kenka yotsu osoto gari (or osoto otoshi):
    You can also do this from an ippon seoi nage grip.

    As a combination, I've been hitting ashi guruma (of all things!) as salvage from failed osotos lately. Basically like so: You can also switch to harai goshi if you're deep enough. The little girl here does it pretty well:
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