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  1. Pat Pintados is offline

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    Apr 2010
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    Kanaduh
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    47

    Posted On:
    3/18/2011 9:22am


     Style: FMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    We have students spar on the first day. But I'm a Bullshido fan. I also do not put too much emphasis on finite locking and disarming that does not often work under full pressure testing. Trapping Definitely, Hammerlocks, underhook Puter Kapala maybe, but not this stuff:



    When I practiced Modern Arnis I had a huge issue with the classic stick locking that DEPENDS SOLEY on me maintaining my hold of my opponent or weapon. There will be no pain, and the lock fails, if I just LET GO.

    I also generally found that my Datu emphasized a close range trapping style of stick work, which does not happen in live sparring. It involved a lot of fine motor movement. That distance more likely would simply degenerate into a clinch based dynamic rather than fancy trappy locky stuff.

    .02
  2. tao.jonez is offline
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    Ninja Fruit

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    Feb 2009
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    NC
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    Posted On:
    3/18/2011 10:26am


     Style: JKD, Jiu Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for posting the video. I didn't know Survivor was still on. Is that Mountainous at 2:50?

    On Topic, I took the Arnis class last night and worked knife disarms. The majority of the disarms and explanations made sense, but one decidedly did not - I'll do my best to explain and maybe someone can shed light:
    this was #8 in a series of 12 disarms when the opponent is holding knife with the point up / slashing. I had my opponent's hand in a simple wrist lock - sort of a kote gaishi. Disarm #7 was to strip away the knife by striking the butt of the knife (forgot the term) but then #8... I was to cross the back of my forearm across opponents and maintain downward/sweeping pressure then LET GO of the wristlock. Then re-grab the knife hand with the same hand rotated 180 deg. for a sort of reverse kote gaishi and disarm with the back of the sweep/pressure hand. Mechanics aside, the letting go of wrist control seemed completely bizarre to me. Is this typical?

    I recognize that the drill is for flow, so maybe it's to learn how to establish control from various positions? Any FMA guys have insight on this type of drill?
    "Never trust a quote you read on the internet" - Abraham Lincoln



  3. Chili Pepper is offline
    Chili Pepper's Avatar

    Senior Member

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    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,258

    Posted On:
    3/18/2011 11:06am


     Style: Siling Labuyo Arnis

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by tao.jonez View Post
    I recognize that the drill is for flow, so maybe it's to learn how to establish control from various positions? Any FMA guys have insight on this type of drill?
    <shrug> disarms are one of those things that get entirely out of hand in FMA. I was originally taught a dozen, and have been taught many more over the years. I've kept maybe two or three, because for the overwhelming majority, they're a complex series of fine-motor actions that need very specific set-ups, and a generally unresisting opponent.

    My standard caveat to my class when I'm teaching knife disarms: "knife disarms are like unicorns; we all know what they look like, but nobody's seen one in person."
  4. Chili Pepper is offline
    Chili Pepper's Avatar

    Senior Member

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    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,258

    Posted On:
    3/18/2011 11:07am


     Style: Siling Labuyo Arnis

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by tao.jonez View Post
    I recognize that the drill is for flow, so maybe it's to learn how to establish control from various positions? Any FMA guys have insight on this type of drill?
    <shrug> disarms are one of those things that get entirely out of hand in FMA. I was originally taught a dozen, and have been taught many more over the years. I've kept maybe two or three, because for the overwhelming majority, they're a complex series of fine-motor actions that need very specific set-ups, and a generally unresisting opponent.

    My standard caveat to my class when I'm teaching knife disarms: "knife disarms are like unicorns; we all know what they look like, but nobody's seen one in person."
  5. tao.jonez is offline
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    Ninja Fruit

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    Feb 2009
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    Posted On:
    3/18/2011 2:57pm


     Style: JKD, Jiu Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Chili Pepper View Post
    My standard caveat to my class when I'm teaching knife disarms: "knife disarms are like unicorns; we all know what they look like, but nobody's seen one in person."
    This was basically stated at the beginning of class- "here are some cool disarms that are good for movement and flow. But the best knife disarm is to shoot or run like hell."
    "Never trust a quote you read on the internet" - Abraham Lincoln



  6. Gulogod is offline

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    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Manila
    Posts
    52

    Posted On:
    3/24/2011 12:11pm


     Style: Suntukaran

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Pintados View Post
    We have students spar on the first day. But I'm a Bullshido fan. I also do not put too much emphasis on finite locking and disarming that does not often work under full pressure testing. Trapping Definitely, Hammerlocks, underhook Puter Kapala maybe, but not this stuff:



    When I practiced Modern Arnis I had a huge issue with the classic stick locking that DEPENDS SOLEY on me maintaining my hold of my opponent or weapon. There will be no pain, and the lock fails, if I just LET GO.

    I also generally found that my Datu emphasized a close range trapping style of stick work, which does not happen in live sparring. It involved a lot of fine motor movement. That distance more likely would simply degenerate into a clinch based dynamic rather than fancy trappy locky stuff.

    .02
    The movements in the video are too complex to actually work. There were layer upon layer of movements which were just a heap of basic movements and concepts. If the first movement won't work, the succeeding movements will be also.
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