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  1. MasterShredder is offline

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    Feb 2011
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    Posted On:
    2/10/2011 1:21pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    My first Jujitsu class

    Okay, so after the help of a lot of people on the forum (thanks all), yesterday I had my first jujitsu class. I had a rehearsal yesterday so I ended up going to the Wednesday class at a different place with a different instructor with different pricing (for the sessions. It was cheaper).

    My experience was on the whole, pretty awesome. I called the sports center the class was at a few minutes before the junior session, as advised by the staff who didnt have any contact details they could give me for the instructor. I just asked if I could join the session and he said "yeah, not a problem". Cool.

    So I turned up early. The junior session was still going on, and for the most part it appeared to be kids in gi's messing about with techniques that looked like jujitsu. This seemed more true of the younger members, as the older ones were actually working on technique from what I saw.

    After a while an adult orange belt turned up. Decent guy, he'd been at the club for 2 years. Then another orange belt turned up. Less friendly, actually we've still not spoken, but hey. Before long the juniors filed out, and we walked into the dojo. I introduced myself to the Sensei, reminding him of the call a couple of hours ago. He was pretty welcoming, asked me if I'd done martial arts before, etc. He asked if I'd like to join in, as it was pretty quiet at the time.

    It was quite a small class size, I think in total there were 6 students; myself, a brown belt (who later told me had been training 14 years and is preparing for his 1st dan. Really friendly guy), two orange belts, a white belt and a purple belt. We started off lining up in descending rank order in a kind of snake/grid. We did this bowing type thing, and then went into a warm up routine which the Sensei was careful to fully explain every step of for my benefit. Now, as of last summer I've been cycling like a maniac and it became my main form of cardio, but then winter set in and... well.. no cardio. Anyway this warm up routine had me wishing I was still riding 100 miles a week. It was followed by some stretches etc, and to me felt like a really effective warm up.

    After that he took me to one side and explained that they were going to do breakfalls now, and explained the principle to me. The class did a number of breakfalls, and he explained them all for my benefit, which was great, and I got to watch the class do those. After that we paired up (me with the white belt) and went through some basic blocking and striking drills using an overhand type attack. My forearms were complaining after a little while, but then we moved onto another slightly more involved drill, then another, then another.

    Then we were told to sit against the wall and he used his brown belt to demonstrate some techniques. The Sensei asked us if there was anything we wanted to learn or if we had any ideas that we wanted him to go over. The white belt said headlock escapes, so he taught us that and we paired up and did that for a while. Then we lined up again, and learned another technique, then another. Then there was a break, and we went on to syllabus. Sensei gave me and the white belt copies of the red belt syllabus and the purple belt was supervising/reminding the white belt of the techniques and clarifying any points... however... the brown belt saw the second techique we were doing and apparantly it was completely wrong (the purple belts fault, different lock). Anyway so while the Sensei was clarifying some points, the brown belt took me aside and taught me the breakfalls, which was much appreciated. Sensei was impressed with my breakfalls (ego boost).

    Then the Sensei wanted to teach me another technique from a double lapell grab (if thats the term) which was really simple, but effective and allowed me to look at some of the important aspects of locks.

    Througout all this, the whole session, everyone was really really friendly, especially the brown belt. They're all genuinely great guys (yes, probably that orange belt too).

    In the break I asked Sensei about sparring and he said that they do spar. They have pads etc and they go semi contact, emphasising that they aren't trying to knock eachother out, but for example body blows can obviously have some kick to them, and that you do actually have to deal with the strikes or it'll hurt. He talked about going to submission, and then also starting on the ground. Apparantly at this school sparring is a big part of the orange belt syllabus.

    According to Sensei they took it a bit slow and relaxed this week. Which is interesting. Jujitsu can hurt. I became acutely aware of that today, at around the same time I became aware of the importance of tapping out. I also learned that I have very supple shoulders. Its not something I've generally paid much attention to, but it was picked up on by anyone attempting a shoulder lock (if thats the term) on me.

    Ok so after the class I enquired about prices (membership and Gi, but he told me grading fees also) and they are rediculously low. He has a stock of all sizes from 120 to 200 apparantly, and we speculated my size after I said I'd need a 180, but the brown belt who is a similar height wears the 190. Anyhoo he's bringing the 180 or 190 to next weeks session so I'll have my gi before long.

    To those who may be interested, at some point I asked if the club was part of international atemi jujitsu, the club with the Sensei in the title of this thread. He told me the same thing about all of them being trained by the same guy, and going their seperate ways. The brown belt told me that the another guy in that organisation "has a different way of training", but he didnt want to say bad stuff about them. He wasn't referring to the same guy though. Out of curiosity and the desire to train more than 90 minutes a week, I'll check out the other classes. Sensei said he had no problems with that, and that some of the other guys train in kickboxing and other things.

    In conclusion, I thoroughly enjoyed the session. I'll more than likely be joining this Jujitsu club. If the insurance for the other atemi jujitsu classes is under the same group (AMA) then, I'll be happily training a few times a week.

    Right now, I'm just trying to remember all the techniques!!! gah! *head explodes*

    (update, its the day after, and I feel like a wreck, I thought it worthy of a new thread. Bitch if its not, and I'll remove it)
  2. Res Judicata is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,633

    Posted On:
    2/10/2011 2:51pm


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sounds like generic gendai budo-type Jujutsu with a self-defense orientation. Hint: that kind of jujutsu usually sucks. I speak from experience.

    Do a search on here for "aliveness."
  3. Eddie Hardon is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
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    London
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    2,502

    Posted On:
    2/10/2011 5:55pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Why worry? If you enjoy and have confidence in the instructor and there is consideration for your progress, then that seems a reasonable way forward. How old are you? Is the Club sensei part of a wider group? What grade (Dan) is he? Who taught him? There should be a syllabus and that can chart your progress. Ju Jitus does hurt and pain is part of the Compliance.

    You can use JJ as a a foundation and it will be useful for 'feeling' technique and how it works. It's really Self Defence and each Technique should have an underlying principle. If this is explained to you, then there is more chance of it sticking. Skills are earned through Drilling and are perishable.

    If you decided that you wish to do another style, be clear in your reasons. Avoid sampling or jumping from art/styles 'cos you'll end up with nothing. Don't spread yourself too thin. Let enjoyment lead you.

    If you find the Perfect Martial Art with all the Answers, then let us know(!);-)

    Good luck.
  4. MasterShredder is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Third Rock From The Sun
    Posts
    47

    Posted On:
    2/10/2011 6:22pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Hardon View Post
    Why worry? If you enjoy and have confidence in the instructor and there is consideration for your progress, then that seems a reasonable way forward. How old are you? Is the Club sensei part of a wider group? What grade (Dan) is he? Who taught him? There should be a syllabus and that can chart your progress. Ju Jitus does hurt and pain is part of the Compliance.

    You can use JJ as a a foundation and it will be useful for 'feeling' technique and how it works. It's really Self Defence and each Technique should have an underlying principle. If this is explained to you, then there is more chance of it sticking. Skills are earned through Drilling and are perishable.

    If you decided that you wish to do another style, be clear in your reasons. Avoid sampling or jumping from art/styles 'cos you'll end up with nothing. Don't spread yourself too thin. Let enjoyment lead you.

    If you find the Perfect Martial Art with all the Answers, then let us know(!);-)

    Good luck.
    There is a syllabus, I'm not sure if I mentioned it in the post. For the syllabus section of the session me and the white belt were working on some of the things from the red belt (next belt up/first belt) syllabus sheet.

    http://www.international-atemijujits.../syllabus.html

    Our Sensei and club is not part of that wider group, though all the jujitsu guys (except one with his own style) in the local area were taught by the same guy (not sure who but I can find out), and use the same syllabus, so I'll be going to some of those classes also, and maybe some of the sport jujitsu sessions. Our Sensei is 4th Dan. In the session I was constantly made aware of the significance of certain details in the technique when I would perform them wrong. I learned some interesting points about footwork too.
  5. MasterShredder is offline

    Featherweight

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    Feb 2011
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    Posted On:
    2/11/2011 12:51am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post
    Sounds like generic gendai budo-type Jujutsu with a self-defense orientation. Hint: that kind of jujutsu usually sucks. I speak from experience.

    Do a search on here for "aliveness."
    Your post intrigued me and so I did some research to find that, the place all the jujitsu instructors (bar one, whos' developed his own style) in my area studied first with WJJF and the BJJA. From what I've found, WJJF "jujitsu" is kinda... well the syllabus is short (4 years to black belt), and some guy in England developed it. From what I see online, they're adept at raking in cash with added fluff like badges per grading and things like that, which isn't a good sign. Anyway, apparantly my Sensei also

    " increased his jujitsu skills training under other jujitsu groups, notably Kempo and Atemi."

    The syllabus now for our club and all the international atemi jujitsu clubs is the same and apparantly takes about 10 years. Check the link in my previous post if you're interested. But what the hell am I learning? I've read things like Gendai Goshin Jujitsu to describe arts like this. Heres a quote I found from a possibly long dead forum:

    QUOTE:
    "If a Japanese based martial system is formulated in modern times (post Tokugawa) but is only partially influenced by traditional Nihon jujutsu, it may be correctly referred to as goshin jujutsu. Goshin jujutsu is usually formulated outside Japan and may include influences from other martial traditions. The popular Gracie jujutsu system, (heavily influenced by modern judo) and Brazilian jujutsu in general are excellent examples of Goshin Jujutsu."

    Though according to that poster, WJJF has way too much JUDO in it to be regarded as Goshin Jujutsu.

    I recently learned of another jujitsu club in a nearby town, but on further inspection they too were teaching some guys "jujutsu". Australian this time.

    Should it be that hard to find a Koryu jujutsu? Whats a good example of one? Is there a practical reason for wanting to study a koryu?
  6. superangryfish is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    165

    Posted On:
    2/11/2011 5:40am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hey, do you actually go to the classes in Luton???
  7. Eddie Hardon is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,502

    Posted On:
    2/11/2011 12:53pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The Syllabus is pretty standard (no criticism there) for British Ju Jitsu and, like as not, dates from the original BJJA and WJJF. I won't bore but the WJJF was a vehicle for Bob Clarke and he inherited the BJJA from Sensei Blundell (its Founder). Ultimately, senior senseies became disenchanted with the admin and eventually left Mr Clarke. They founded the successor, the BJJA GB, which continues today. Additionally, international seminars and competition are offered through them.

    It looks tickety-boo! to me so, as said, if you like the club and its senseis, then you lose nothing and can gain a lot.

    If you are being taught correctly and in a friendly mature atmosphere, then that's fine. Make sure Insurance is provided for in the case of injury. Additionally, the Club sensei should have Personal Insurance Indemnity. He should be Emergency Aid trained and with a current Certificate. He should also have been CRB checked. All these should bring confidence in training and knowing that you are in a legit organisation.

    There's bugger all money to be made in Trad JJ so it really is personal interest, friendship and sense of humour based.

    You'd be amazed at the high quality instructors I have trained under (and still do) that have small but dedicated numbers. It's a bonus if you can cover your costs. My club failed twice.

    At a later stage if you decide to change course, you will hopefully have a reasonable body of knowledge and the capacity to assess critically any other offerings.

    Good luck.
  8. MasterShredder is offline

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    Posted On:
    2/16/2011 6:07pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Hardon View Post
    The Syllabus is pretty standard (no criticism there) for British Ju Jitsu and, like as not, dates from the original BJJA and WJJF. I won't bore but the WJJF was a vehicle for Bob Clarke and he inherited the BJJA from Sensei Blundell (its Founder). Ultimately, senior senseies became disenchanted with the admin and eventually left Mr Clarke. They founded the successor, the BJJA GB, which continues today. Additionally, international seminars and competition are offered through them.

    It looks tickety-boo! to me so, as said, if you like the club and its senseis, then you lose nothing and can gain a lot.

    If you are being taught correctly and in a friendly mature atmosphere, then that's fine. Make sure Insurance is provided for in the case of injury. Additionally, the Club sensei should have Personal Insurance Indemnity. He should be Emergency Aid trained and with a current Certificate. He should also have been CRB checked. All these should bring confidence in training and knowing that you are in a legit organisation.

    There's bugger all money to be made in Trad JJ so it really is personal interest, friendship and sense of humour based.

    You'd be amazed at the high quality instructors I have trained under (and still do) that have small but dedicated numbers. It's a bonus if you can cover your costs. My club failed twice.

    At a later stage if you decide to change course, you will hopefully have a reasonable body of knowledge and the capacity to assess critically any other offerings.

    Good luck.
    Thanks a lot for the info. Today was my second session, and a little different from the first. The warm up was more intensive than last time, and then after that we did some work on focus pads, punching and kicking. Bearing in mind no one had taught me any strikes in this system so... constant corrections. I think at one point to save my ego I may have uttered "the punching is very different to wing chun". Anyhoo, so after doing that for a while, there was a break, then we learned some techniques. Interestingly the Sensei said that if any of us see a jujitsu technique on youtube or where ever that we like and want to learn, bring it in and he'll break it down for us and teach us it. In fact the first technique he showed us he said he saw on youtube recently, and actually so had I, it was this thumblock thing from a handshake. I had some success with it but I doubt I would use it in a real situation. Or maybe I would after more practise. He showed us a few techniques, and one he had a simplified version of for my benefit, which was essentially an o soto gari to arm bar (from my limited knowledge), instead of this rolling throwing thing.

    After a few techniques we were onto syllabus work, which entailed a whistlestop tour of the various escapes from front and rear lapell grabs, stuff from punches, and a 20 move blocking kata. All of which I was shown once, and had to try. I was also taught/ran through all of the breakfalls. The reason for the pace was because the white belt I was training with was due for his red belt grading next week, so the brown belt and Sensei were making him demonstrate the techniques. From a psychological perspective, its always easier to learn things once you've at least seen them once before. So in the coming weeks these techniques shouldn't feel totally alien to me when its time to properly learn the rest of them. Ths week some more of the important details regarding positioning and footwork with the techniques were highlighted for me, which was good. Where to have my feet at certain times etc.

    I was supposed to get my gi today but Sensei forgot all the stuff he was supposed to bring for people. I was gutted. I'm getting my insurance/license next week also. Hopefully next week will be even more productive, though after that I'm less busy and can train at the other club (same syllabus) too, having at least 2 or 3 sessions a week instead of just the one. Once a week is lame.
  9. MasterShredder is offline

    Featherweight

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    Feb 2011
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    Posted On:
    2/16/2011 6:09pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh, and time will tell if this week was as hard on my body as last week... I didnt feel it until the next daym but when I did, I FELT IT, lol.
  10. MasterShredder is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
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    Posted On:
    2/16/2011 6:24pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jujitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yes. Filler, why five characters? That seems an arbitrary number. Perhaps my answer should have been rephrased:

    "Why yes indeed I do in fact attend jujitsu classes at a set of coordinates within the geographical perimeter of the township of Luton."

    Why do you ask? Are you a stalker? I'm really quite boring.
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