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  1. Diesel_tke is offline
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    Light Heavyweight

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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 4:20pm

    supporting member
     Style: stick,Taiji, mountainbike

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    To me footwork is creating angles, creating distance, closing distance, and using footwork for evasion.

    I think boxing is better at it. Xingyi's footwork seems to just facilitate the lateral movement. I didn't find it even to be half as effective as boxing. Even the Sanda guys I have sparred, threw the Xingyi footwork out the window when sparring starting. One guy who uses Xingyi and no Sanda or kickboxing, had issues moving around the ring.
    Combatives training log.

    Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

    Drum thread

    Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you cardio without the dishonour of aerobics.
  2. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 4:29pm

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     Style: xingyi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Xingyi has very little footwork when compared to boxing IMO.
    Yes, we agree. I'm still need atomic to comment because, he must be talking about something else.
  3. atomicpoet is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 4:50pm


     Style: Western Boxing, Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I guess "push" is the wrong word I'm looking for. To be more precise, what I mean is that in boxing, you put pressure on the ball of your hind foot when you strike. While I don't think the foot itself generates power, I think it helps. Without balance, strikes are weak.

    With Xingyi, I see people sometimes make strikes with all the weight on the front foot as the hind foot then moves in front. When this is done, the striker seems perfectly balanced and seems able to hit with power. I think that's pretty cool.

    The question is: how is this done?
  4. chainpunch is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 4:56pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
      Style: Wing Chun

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Someone correct me if I am wrong but the power comes from the former rear foot moving forward in front not from the rear foot coming equal to the front foot. The practitioner strikes as the foot moves forward which makes it acceptable for common understanding. There seems to be a pause as the rear comes up to the supporting leg but that motion does not look like its timed with a strike.
  5. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 4:57pm

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     Style: xingyi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by atomicpoet View Post
    I guess "push" is the wrong word I'm looking for. To be more precise, what I mean is that in boxing, you put pressure on the ball of your hind foot when you strike. While I don't think the foot itself generates power, I think it helps. Without balance, strikes are weak.
    Okay there are multiple ways to generate power in boxing. You are naming one way that YOU use.

    With Xingyi, I see people sometimes make strikes with all the weight on the front foot as the hind foot then moves in front. When this is done, the striker seems perfectly balanced and seems able to hit with power. I think that's pretty cool.

    The question is: how is this done?
    I've seen boxers who do the same thing. Go see if you can find a pdf of Jack Dempseys boxing book and read it.
    .
  6. atomicpoet is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 5:21pm


     Style: Western Boxing, Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    Okay there are multiple ways to generate power in boxing. You are naming one way that YOU use.
    It sure is, but at the same time, it's how I've been taught. For greater context, I've been taught to always keep my hind foot behind my front foot, and to never let it go in front. In Xingyi, I see it done all the time.

    I know I can take a class and find out how it's done. However, in another thread, you asked me why I found Xingyi's footwork to be confusing, and this is why.

    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    I've seen boxers who do the same thing. Go see if you can find a pdf of Jack Dempseys boxing book and read it.
    .
    I absolutely would. However, rather than plodding through the entire book and trying to find out which parts are relevant to Xingyi, are you aware of which chapter talks about this particular topic?
  7. It is Fake is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 5:27pm

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     Style: xingyi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Did you really think I didn't know why you created the thread? I just explained that your definition of footwork does not match mine.

    Is it some or all Xingyi practitioners? In forms, sparring or competition? What are you using as comparison videos?

    You haven't described footwork like what DT stated. You are asking how they generate power with their stepping motion. To me that isn't footwork. MMAmickey described power generation to you. Like I said, I have seen boxers do what you just described. Have you asked your coach about this at all?

    The entire book.
  8. Permalost is online now
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 5:38pm

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     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There was a xingyi guy who came to one or two of the old Bullshido park meetups here. He would step straight through with his back foot as he punched, and it was weird to be on the receiving end. The reason was that he was able to make use of his forward momentum to get enough power to knock me back and set up the next one (this would be targeting my chest mostly). It would work for 2-4 strikes in a row.
  9. atomicpoet is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 5:38pm


     Style: Western Boxing, Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    Did you really think I didn't know why you created the thread?
    Just making sure you knew why.

    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    You are asking how they generate power with their stepping motion.
    Yes. Definitions aside, this is what I'm asking.

    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    Have you asked your coach about this at all?
    Yes. I've been told not to do it since this leaves me vulnerable. I believe him.

    Quote Originally Posted by It is Fake View Post
    The entire book.
    Just to be clear, you are saying that Jack Dempsey's style of boxing is similar to Xingyi? If so, how similar?
  10. Rivington is offline
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    Posted On:
    1/24/2011 6:00pm

    supporting member
     Style: Taijiquan/Shuai-Chiao/BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The entire book is about 100 pages long (with pictures). Just take a nap first before tackling it.

    Also, "the falling step."
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