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  1. dustymars is offline

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    Jan 2007
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    Lake Placid, FL
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    Posted On:
    1/26/2011 7:49pm


     Style: Judo

    -1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by judoka_uk View Post
    If you think I have a vast knowledge of Judo you're going to **** yourself when you meet someone who actually does have a vast knowledge of Judo!
    Don't sell yourself short. You seem to know a of of Judo. When I was your age most of what I would improve one I had learned by then. I had been shown and to a degree demonstrated all of the go kyo no waza and much of the katame waza; however, it was an uphill climb form then on for at least 50 years.

    The method Okano-san shows us is the correct way for beginners as well as more experienced Judoka, but the teaching of it has been lost over the years. Mostly our fault for getting into teaching as shodan and nidan; before we knew Judo. :)

    If typos appear it is because I had eyelid surgery this morning and not really seeing all that good yet.
  2. dustymars is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/26/2011 7:52pm


     Style: Judo

    -1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It matters less that you were taught the sidestepping or sliding way, now you have something new to practice; I call it the Okano way or our way. It does not mean your way is wrong.
  3. Res Judicata is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/15/2011 11:06am


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Amusing addition: I'm still nursing my injured knee, so I'm working on a lot of technical and less physical throws. I asked my coach how to do okuri ashi barai (I'm awful at this technique). His response was essentially:

    As in kata? Or for real? Kata is this way (shows kata form). If you want to actually throw someone, push him and do it this way (shows the "Okano" form).
  4. kumijitsu is offline

    Featherweight

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    May 2008
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    Corvallis, Oregon
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    17

    Posted On:
    6/15/2011 12:03pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jujitsu, BJJ, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ed Szrejter, 9th Dan United States Judo Association had remarkable Ashi-Waza. He taught the method Okano used in that video at a seminar in 2002. Although it's harder to learn, I think it is much better for addressing timing and sensitivity issues involved in Rondori. It's well worth the extra time to learn this technique. Sensei Szrejter advocated the use of having your eyes closed when practicing all of the Ashi-Waza so you could learn to "feel" how uke is stepping. Obviously he didn't advocate this in rondori, but it was a useful training tool that kept me from telegraphing my foot sweeps as much in rondori. Sensei Szrejter noticed I would look down before doing any Ashi-Waza and was kind enough to point it out. He taught me to look without bending my neck so as not to announce to the world my intentions. The other method of Okuri-Ashi-Barai is easy to learn. I would have much rather learned the Okano method initially, even though it would have taken twice as long. I would rather have a technique that is difficult to learn but is intuitive to rondori than learn a technique that is easy to learn but hard to pull off in rondori.
  5. Outis is offline

    Registered Member

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    Feb 2011
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    Posted On:
    6/27/2011 11:02pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Having been taught the slide-to-the-side method, I just noted that both are shown on the JudoInfo video clip of the throw:

    http://judoinfo.com/video/gokyo/OkuriAshiHarai.wmv
  6. BKR is offline
    BKR's Avatar

    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Bonners Ferry, Idaho
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    Posted On:
    6/27/2011 11:28pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by kumijitsu View Post
    Ed Szrejter, 9th Dan United States Judo Association had remarkable Ashi-Waza. He taught the method Okano used in that video at a seminar in 2002. Although it's harder to learn, I think it is much better for addressing timing and sensitivity issues involved in Rondori. It's well worth the extra time to learn this technique. Sensei Szrejter advocated the use of having your eyes closed when practicing all of the Ashi-Waza so you could learn to "feel" how uke is stepping. Obviously he didn't advocate this in rondori, but it was a useful training tool that kept me from telegraphing my foot sweeps as much in rondori. Sensei Szrejter noticed I would look down before doing any Ashi-Waza and was kind enough to point it out. He taught me to look without bending my neck so as not to announce to the world my intentions. The other method of Okuri-Ashi-Barai is easy to learn. I would have much rather learned the Okano method initially, even though it would have taken twice as long. I would rather have a technique that is difficult to learn but is intuitive to rondori than learn a technique that is easy to learn but hard to pull off in rondori.
    Obviously you don't teach judo much. Either one takes a long time to get right, in practice or in shiai. The back sliding one does have more application in shiai, but in the long run, either one will do.

    In any case, everyone should start out with De Ashi Barai in it's many forms before moving to Okuri Ashi Barai. I don't teach them together, but focus on De Ashi Barai for a long time before moving to Okuri Ashi Barai, because the truth is that pulling off Okuri with either method in shiai is pretty damned hard.

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  7. judoka_uk is offline
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    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    6/30/2011 8:56am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post
    As in kata? Or for real? Kata is this way (shows kata form). If you want to actually throw someone, push him and do it this way (shows the "Okano" form).
    Lol, well yes, quite.
  8. bigstu31s is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/05/2011 5:13am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My Coach calls this the "oomph" throw, as that's the sound Uke makes as he hits the mat and all his air is knocked out of his body.
  9. BKR is offline
    BKR's Avatar

    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

    Join Date
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    Bonners Ferry, Idaho
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    4,336

    Posted On:
    7/09/2011 7:51pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kodokan Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by bigstu31s View Post
    My Coach calls this the "oomph" throw, as that's the sound Uke makes as he hits the mat and all his air is knocked out of his body.
    Sure, if you don't support him when he/she falls.

    Ben
    Falling for Judo since 1980
  10. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/09/2011 8:10pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was chatting with my mate about our coaches Okuri ashi barai and how he's quite nice, because he supports us on the way down and doesn't do the contest version of his okuri ashi barai where he uses his hands to slam uke into the ground, because that fucking hurts.
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