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  1. #21
    Snake Plissken's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by chingythingy View Post
    But if people could somehow learn to just keep showing up they'd be fine.
    If people would keep showing up, despite the perception of "failing", then yes, they would be fine.

    When they first start going, everything is viewed as "success" because everything is "big rocks", but the longer they go, the larger the chance for perceived "failure" when things go from a greater, general overall view of view of their training, "big rocks" to more and more specialized focus, "small rocks" to "sand". It becomes harder to see the success as the gains are smaller in perception, nuanced even, despite those gains are more valuable.

    It's getting a handle on those small gains that get you over the plateau

  2. #22
    Uncle Skippy's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Plissken View Post
    If people would keep showing up, despite the perception of "failing", then yes, they would be fine.
    Egos always tend to get in the way of successful training. I wish there was a post-workout dietary supplement that would suppress the ego so that training sessions would be more likely to be perceived in a positive light.

  3. #23

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wow you guys have really stRted a good conversation. I like the reaction....

  4. #24
    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours. Join us... or die
    BKR's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Skippy View Post
    Egos always tend to get in the way of successful training. I wish there was a post-workout dietary supplement that would suppress the ego so that training sessions would be more likely to be perceived in a positive light.
    How about a supplement that would make you more aware of how your ego is hindering progress ? That would be more useful than supressing it.

    I always got my ego supression at the hands of my instructor. Instant feedback has a way of opening your eyes.

    Ben

  5. #25
    Snake Plissken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Skippy View Post
    Egos always tend to get in the way of successful training. I wish there was a post-workout dietary supplement that would suppress the ego so that training sessions would be more likely to be perceived in a positive light.
    Vitamin "K" (kick in the ass) usually works!

    I agree. Backsliding is a good thing if the backslide involves you breaking something you had been habitually doing wrong, down to formula, and then building it back up correctly, based on your advanced training.

  6. #26

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Navita View Post
    Wow you guys have really stRted a good conversation. I like the reaction....
    Ugh, we talk good. Think smart.

  7. #27
    M1K3's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think it depends on your goals. At 57 my goal is to simply train once or twice a week for the next 10 years or so. Belts are not important to me especially since I train no-gi. I just want to improve and to occasionally tap out some young guy who thinks this roll is going to be easy because he got the old guy. If I'm rolling with the higher belts/levels my goal is to roll and avoid being tapped out because I played good defense.

    Life is good.

  8. #28
    Coach Josh's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Communication is always the problem with students and instructors. Many instructors do not take the time to really talk to their students nor do they have a policy for students to voice their concerns. They do not do much in order to change or adapt to the students that they have in order to give them the most for their money. We get into a rut and students generally want some change and improvement in not only themselves but their instructor.

    Students also are too scared to talk to their instructor and let them know that they are dissatisfied and want a change. Sometimes it is just that simple unfortunate some instructors take it as an insult.

    We try and make it better at the gym for all of our people. While you can't make everyone happy you can some up with a solution that will at least meet half way. A lot of it is a give and take. One possible solution for many blue belts is to have a class devoted just to them and the techniques that blue belts need to master instead of constantly going to class and redoing white belt stuff.

    Maybe setup a once a week gathering for people your age sex and rank where y'all just get together and workout without an instructor and go over the techniques you just learned.

    Many many times it will be up to the student to push to make things better for themselves. I know a lot of pressure is put on taking private lessons but to be honest I have only done a few over the past 2 years and at $60 an hour IDK if that is too high or not but I know that not many people will do it.
    Judo is only gentle for the guy on top.

  9. #29
    JordanT's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think that the instructors ego plays a roll as well. White belts you can TELL what to do and not do. They'll accept it and stick around. You'll still be a jackass for saying things like "Never cross your feet from rear mount", but they'll listen and still respect you. If you do this to guys that know the game, their respect for you will drop. If I'm dealing with someone with knowledge, even at a white belt level, I respect that and add on, as opposed to attacking their methods, even if they're different. People will respect you much more and feel welcome in your classes.

  10. #30
    EmperorCesar's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I remember when I got my blue belt, I was expecting more stripes on my white belt instead of a blue belt that day. I honestly did not care either way, all I cared about was going in there and learning, which I was doing plenty of.

    However, this reminds me of a funny story. There use to be a Hapkido class training on our mat before they left and the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu class showed up. I showed up early one day, and I sat on a chair against the wall next to a soccer mom. She started talking to me, and I basically told her that I was waiting for the BJJ class. After class was over, her kid walked up to her and the soccer mom asked her kid about trying out BJJ. His response was "No, it takes too long to get belts in that".

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