Page 3 of 3 First 123
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    64
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This stance can be used as the ending of your throw. You pick your opponent off the ground, flip him upside down. You then smash his head straight down to the groud, and end with that posture. The reason that you want to get into this kind of low stance is your want to make sure that your opponent's head will be hit on the ground and not just his body.

    The acceslation body dropping part is not shown in this clip but the throw is the same.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58ZuG_9eEaI

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    289
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I saw this stance once in Dr. Yang Jwing Ming's Long Fist book. He called it "Taming the Tiger Stance" and had this story about someone using it to duck under a tiger and disembowel it with a dagger as it pounced at him. That's probably bullshit but anyway he advocates for it as an evasion stance. I happen to own the book as a fun/casual read as I would like to study Long Fist one day but alas it seems every Kung Fu school is the Chun. Does anyone know if this book/Yang Jwing Ming is full of crap or dead drilling or is this a good book to read. I'm not trying to learn from a book as that would be stupid, just curious.
    Last edited by Epeeist; 3/08/2011 7:25pm at .

  3. #23
    In the blackest moment of a dying world, what have you become? supporting member
    W. Rabbit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    10,474
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Epeeist View Post
    I saw this stance once in Dr. Yang Jwing Ming's Long Fist book. He called it "Taming the Tiger Stance" and had this story about someone using it to duck under a tiger and disembowel it with a dagger as it pounced at him. That's probably bullshit but anyway he advocates for it as an evasion stance. I happen to own the book as a fun/casual read as I would like to study Long Fist one day but alas it seems every Kung Fu school is the Chun. Does anyone know if this book/Yang Jwing Ming is full of crap or dead drilling or is this a good book to read. I'm not trying to learn from a book as that would be stupid, just curious.
    Bullshido is a great starting point for finding a good gong fu school. No they are not all the Chun.

    I have Yang Jwing Ming stuff (books, dvds), it's not bad.

    Find a good instructor.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    289
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Bullshido is a great starting point for finding a good gong fu school. No they are not all the Chun.

    I have Yang Jwing Ming stuff (books, dvds), it's not bad.

    Find a good instructor.
    Thanks for the advice. I'm hoping I get into law school in the Raleigh Durham area where CMA pickings are greater. A lot of schools I see are Wing Chun though there is a Hung Gar school in Charlotte if I wind up going around there for law school. I'm more interested in Northern Styles, though although Hung Gar and Choi Lei Fut look like fun as well. I'd even take Contemporary Wushu-type Long Fist as long as they had a Sanda team and had real fighting in addition to taolu. My heart is kind of set on Long Fist for aesthetic reasons as I wrestled from elementary school all the way to sophomore year of high school and therefore believe I have a somewhat acceptable grounding in "alive" training and bullshido detection and already have some decent self-defence skills and am looking to do something fun, preferably with long range kicks and striking. My ideal school would be Northern Style with Sanda training and/or a fight team because I would honestly like to do fun forms and also compete in Lei Tai and San Shou once I've trained enough.
    Last edited by Epeeist; 3/09/2011 6:27pm at .

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fargo, ND
    Posts
    5
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ...I have also heard the stance referred to as a "pok toi", but most commonly just "drop stance". As far as practicality, I don't think i have seen the whole flying-v thing a lot... but that guy in blue posted by W.Rabbit is doing essentially how I have always seen it in any northern forms. (lead hand guarding the instep and back hand straight behind for balance.) Other than that it is often used in sweeps (I hate to brag, but my pok toi sweeps are legendary.) I have seen it in southern styles, BUT it is usually significantly higher, and can hardly be called the same thing.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fargo, ND
    Posts
    5
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    just a side note from my other comment, here is a link to a video of someone doing a similar version of my form featuring the double pok toi sweep: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qA1q8...eature=related

Page 3 of 3 First 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO