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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    373
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is not the first time that I've had the advice to do front squats instead. I think I'll try them as soon as I can get some good instruction on how to do them.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    134
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm curious as to why you might recommend front squats, of all the squats they put the knees the furthest compared to a oyl style high bar.

    Maybe consider a wider power lifting style low bar instead?

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    134
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nevermind I read the article, seems like they are saying that there is just as much muscle activation, but with less weight. Less weight making for less compression. Only thing is you won't be working out your hamstrings very well, so maybe do some RDLs?

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    13
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Elbowtko, in terms of not working out your hamstrings as much I do agree with you there but I primarily do squats for quad development and front squats use equal amounts of muscle as back squats but use the quads more than back squats.

    So my answer to you is hamstrings are important but if I am doing straight leg deadlifts for my hamstrings then it makes sense using front squats apart from the myriad of other reasons.

    Ps. I do normal deadlifts on pull day and straight leg deadlifts after front squats on legs and stomach day.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    13
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Oh yeh and as for the myriad of reasons I talked about before. I will mention them below and paste the article to prove the claim.

    1. Less Compression force so healthier on joints.
    2. Equal strength development for a lighter weights
    3. Less Knee stress not more. The damage to knees is done from compression force (back squats) not sheer force (front squats).
    if you have knee problems, such as ligament damage or meniscus tears, or if you have problems with osteoarthritis, then you may want to stick with the front squat since compressive forces can damage knee cartilage. That is from the article.
    4. Greater use of core muscles for stabilisation such as stomach and lower back.
    5. Greater emphasis on quads than back squat which is good cuz hamstrings can be dealth with with straight leg deadlifts.

    http://www.precisionnutrition.com/re...or-back-squats

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    67
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    4 years later

    Guys,

    I do realize it is now 4 years later but I have good reason to bump this thread. This is a continuation of the squat issue. Since this situation I took over a year off of lifting. Then I went back and started the stronglifts program all over again. My knees where doing well. Between 5-6 months while squatting something seemed to "pop out" in my lower back. I kept at it for about another month but ultimately had to stop because my lower back was in too much pain to continue.

    I took another 1.5 years off training and then went back at it. In about 4 months the same back problems returned. Back pain that affected me 24/7. I had to stop again.

    Now after a 2 year break, I'm still not ready to give up. I still can feel slight pressure all the time in that area in my lower back so maybe squats aren't just meant to be for me. Anyway a friend recently recommended trap bar deadlifts from a raised platform as a great substitution for squats. This guy had has spine totally wrecked in a motorcycle accident and now he's back to deadlifting over 400lb.

    It seems like there may be a silver lining here.

    What do you guys think? Could I reasonably replace squatting with trap bar deadlifts?

    *BTW My lifting goals are mostly overall strength and of course a nice physique.

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