232549 Bullies, 4401 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 18
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. OZZ is offline
    OZZ's Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    London,Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,241

    Posted On:
    12/08/2010 9:58pm

    supporting member
     Style: Short Fist Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Mike Tyson, Chavez Sr. To Be Inducted To Boxing Hall of Fame

    Both Tyson and Chavez are going to be going to the Hall of Fame.

    Should come as no surprise to fans of the sport. Despite all the negative press and a less-than impressive tail end to his career, Tyson became the youngest Heavyweight Champion in History when he KO'd Berbick and soon unified the title bringing excitement back to the sport. He tore through the Heavyweight division in a manner not seen in years, defeating many of his opponents through sheer intimidation long before they even stepped in the ring with him. He was unable to unify his crown after losing it to Buster Douglas, but did manage to re claim two of the the three major belts after getting out of prison. Unfortunately, the passing of Cus D'Amato contributed to Tyson's decline as a fighter and he likely could have been an even greater, more important boxer in historical terms if he hadn't lost his father-figure and mentor and fallen prey to the manipulative Don King.

    Julio Cesaer Chavez Sr. was considered Pound-for-Pound one of the greatest fighters ever and was, like Tyson, a Don King property - earning some much needed income for the promoter when Tyson was in prison. His contest with Pernell Whitaker (a controversial draw) remains one of the biggest blemishes on his impressive record.However, it is a record many critics argue was puffed up by undistinguished competition in bouts that took place in Mexico over the years. His TKO decision over Meldrick Taylor with 3 seconds remaining in a fight that he was losing on the scorecards was as impressive a comeback in the late stages of a fight that I have ever seen.

    Both certainly deserve to be in the Hall..

    Stallone gets in for writing 'Rocky'??
    Well, I guess he really isn't 'just another bum from the neighborhood' now, is he?

    CANASTOTA, N.Y. -- "Yo, Adrian! I did it!"

    That was one of the more famous lines from the "Rocky" movie series that not only made Sylvester Stallone what he is today, but also captured boxing's heart for decades.

    On Tuesday, Stallone was rewarded. He, in fact, "did it!"

    The actor, who penned the script about an underdog boxer from Philadelphia named Rocky Balboa, was named -- along with Iron Mike Tyson and Julio Cesar Chavez, among others -- to the 12-member 2011 class for induction into the International Boxing Hall of Fame and Museum.

    "Rocky" was released in 1976, and was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, winning best picture, best director and best film editing.

    "It has been my privilege to have been blessed with the ability to write about the incredible courage and commitment of the many thousands of real-life Rockys whom we have watched perform honourably in the ring," Stallone said in a statement.

    Stallone also wrote five other movies based on the Rocky Balboa character and in 2006, was awarded the Boxing Writers Association of America award for "Lifetime Cinematic Achievement in Boxing."

    "The two things that brought boxing back to the forefront with the public was the great success of the 1976 Olympic team and when Sylvester Stallone gave us our heavyweight champion -- Rocky Balboa," Hall of Famer Emanuel Steward said. "I still get goosebumps when I hear the Rocky theme."

    While Stallone delivered goosebumps, Tyson delivered plain, old bumps (and bruises) during his career.

    The self-proclaimed "baddest man on the planet" won his first 19 professional bouts by knockout, 12 in the first round. On the November 1986 night that he knocked out WBC champion Trevor Berbick for a piece of the heavyweight title, a man who had watched Tyson learn the sweet science in Cus D'Amato's gym in Catskill, N.Y. said he figured Tyson would end up in an electric chair one day.

    "I am honoured," Tyson said. "The sport of boxing has given me so much, and it is truly a blessing to be acknowledged alongside other historical boxing legends because they paved the way for me, as I hope I have inspired others in this great sport."

    Tyson electrified boxing with his devastating punching power and crude off-the-cuff remarks. When he beat journeyman Jesse Ferguson in his first nationally televised fight after a stunning uppercut sent blood spattering into the ringside seats at Houston Field House in Troy, N.Y., Tyson said, after the bout was stopped in the sixth round, that he tried "to push the bone into the brain."

    Tyson won the WBA title with a 12-round decision over James Smith in 1987 and unified the titles later in the year with a 12-round victory over IBF champion Tony Tucker. Tyson defended the unified titles in victories over Larry Holmes, Tony Tubbs, Frank Bruno and Carl Williams, then stopped Michael Spinks in 91 seconds to earn universal recognition as champion in 1988.

    Both cocky and shy with the lispy voice of a little boy, Tyson's time at the top was fleeting. He suffered a stunning 10th-round knockout loss to James (Buster) Douglas on Feb. 11, 1990, in Tokyo. After rebounding with four victories, a proposed title fight in 1991 with Evander Holyfield was postponed because of a rib injury. Tyson was then incarcerated for rape from 1992-95, and ensuing bizarre behaviour took over his career from that point.

    "Mike Tyson was the Notre Dame of boxing," said former AP boxing writer Ed Schuyler Jr., who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in June. "People paid to see him fight, hoping he would destroy somebody or get destroyed. The haters watch as much as the lovers, you know."

    Tyson reclaimed the WBC and WBA titles in 1996 by knocking out Bruno in three rounds and Bruce Seldon in the first. But that same year, he lost the WBA belt to Holyfield in 11 rounds and was disqualified in their 1997 rematch after biting both of Holyfield's ears.

    "If I wasn't in boxing, I'd be breaking the law," Tyson once said. "That's my nature."

    From 1999-2001 Tyson fought six times, beating Frans Botha in five rounds, Lou Savarese in one, and Brian Nielsen in seven. In 2002, Tyson suffered an eighth-round knockout in an unsuccessful title bid against Lennox Lewis and retired in 2005 with a 50-6-2 record with 44 knockouts.

    In the end, Tyson made more than US$300 million. Not bad for a kid who went from the bowels of Brooklyn, to reform school, to D'Amato's gym in upstate New York. Eventually, he was called heavyweight champion, he was called inmate No. 922335 at the Indiana Youth Center, and he was called a legend. Now, he can be called a Hall of Famer.

    So, too, can Chavez, whose trademark was the knockout. The three-division champion registered 88 before retiring five years ago with a professional record of 107-6-2. The man who grew up in an abandoned railroad car with his five sisters and four brothers was nearly rendered speechless by his selection.

    "I feel humble," Chavez said. "At this moment in my life, to be inducted into the Hall of Fame is very special. I feel great to know that my name will be inscribed with the best of the best, to join some of my heroes and to leave a mark for my family and my country."

    Russian-born Kostya Tszyu, a junior welterweight champion, also was selected along with Mexican trainer Ignacio (Nacho) Beristain, and referee Joe Cortez.

    Posthumous honorees to be enshrined June 12 include: bantamweight Memphis Pal Moore, light heavyweight champion Jack Root, and middleweight Dave Shade in the old-timer category; British heavyweight John Gully in the pioneer category; promoter A.F. Bettinson; and former BBC broadcaster Harry Carpenter.

    Inductees were voted in by members of the Boxing Writers Association of America and a panel of international boxing historians.
    " If one wants to have a friend one must also want to wage war for him: and to wage war one must be capable of being an enemy." - Fr. Nietzsche 'On The Friend' Thus Spake Zarathustra
  2. battlefields is offline
    battlefields's Avatar

    Moderator

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Australia, Land of Oz
    Posts
    5,234

    Posted On:
    12/08/2010 10:11pm

    forum leader
     Style: BJJ/ MMA/ MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Same with Kostya Tszyu.
  3. Eddie Hardon is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,502

    Posted On:
    12/09/2010 9:11am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by battlefields View Post
    Same with Kostya Tszyu.
    Just hitching a lift so I can post.

    OZZ
    Thank you. Nice one mate.

    Rocky Balboa is based on Rocco Barbella - better known as Rocky Graziano. A Belting Right Hand took him to the World MW Title. He was a contemporary of ole Raging Bull himself but I think he Retired shortly after he was KO'd by Sugar Ray Robinson. Now, THAT was a boxer-fighter par excellence.

    Mike Tyson. Agreed. He shattered every fighter on his way to title (except James Tillis) AND NEVER LOST A ROUND - in my opinion. The death of Jimmy Jacobs allowed Don King to impose himself and play the Race Card and more. Jacobs tried to secure Tyson's future by investing in US Treasury Bills etc so Mike could Retire at 30. Cayton had the film collection and Business Nous. When Jacobs realised that leukaemia would claim him, he tried to assign his managerial Rights to his wife to continue to protect and guide Tyson in concert with Bill Cayton.

    Well, once Robin Givens and her mother married Tyson and bent his ear and opened him toward's King's influence, a veritable tragedy unfolded.

    What happened to his extraordinary elusiveness? (Check the fight against Reggie Gross). No, Overconfidence began to enter the equation (hence the change from "Iron" Mike Tyson to "Mighty" Mike Tyson. Lord, Spare me.

    I thought he'd burn at 23 years - a glorious chapter nonetheless - but he lost his way so his Legend became tarnished - to say the least. Even so, it's right he should be there not least on his Defences and World HW and Cruiserweight (Alonzo TRatliff all 6ft 5ins of him) Titleholders alone.

    Julio. Yes, yes, yes. AS for that fight with Edwin Rosario...Blimey. I don't think I saw the fight with Pernell (not in UK) but read of it, so I dunno. For the Meldrick Taylor fight...well, for me, Richard Steele was the best Ref in the World and I accept his judgment.

    Er, thassit. Thanks for the Post.:notworthy
    Last edited by Eddie Hardon; 12/09/2010 9:14am at . Reason: typos
  4. Snake Plissken is offline
    Snake Plissken's Avatar

    When I Get Back

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    11,559

    Posted On:
    12/09/2010 10:19am

    supporting member
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If we could just capsulize Tyson's early career and forget the rest....

    I remember seeing Chavez fight Rufegio Rojas on the MSN network. JCC kept Rojas pinned into the corners so much that the guy actually had the Mitsubishi loga on his back after the fight, since the ink was still a little fresh on the turnbuckle logos.
  5. Eddie Hardon is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,502

    Posted On:
    12/09/2010 11:44am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by King Moonracer View Post
    If we could just capsulize Tyson's early career and forget the rest....

    I remember seeing Chavez fight Rufegio Rojas on the MSN network. JCC kept Rojas pinned into the corners so much that the guy actually had the Mitsubishi loga on his back after the fight, since the ink was still a little fresh on the turnbuckle logos.

    HA!HA! Quality!

    Reminds of when Tyson fought Julius Whatsisname (it'll come to me) and for a joke the Daily Mirror sponsored the soles of his boxing shoes. It looked less like a joke after Tyson laid him out so the sponsorship was there for all to see.

    Yes, Agreed. Tyson was the proverbial Lightning in a bottle until he started to get bored and slipped. Even allowing for Mitch Green and Bonecrusher Smith grabbing hold for dear life after each time they got walloped, the memory makes he smile. All their physical advantages meant nothing. Smith had the temerity to rebuke Emile Griffiths "don't scratch me" when ministering to him during a corner break. Perhaps Griffiths had long nails but even so - he wanted out. He was regretting agreeing to fight Tyson. The Brit commentator who drew attention to this was The Great Reg Gutteridge. Truly knowledgeable and respected by Ali hence all the top US fighters knew him by his first name. Far better than Harry Carpenter.

    cheers
    Last edited by Eddie Hardon; 12/09/2010 11:45am at . Reason: Effiing typos - more thumbs than fingers...
  6. OZZ is offline
    OZZ's Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    London,Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,241

    Posted On:
    12/09/2010 2:38pm

    supporting member
     Style: Short Fist Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think I was about as big a Tyson fan as one could get up until the rape conviction.. I have my own theory on that one, but that's another story..needless to say it was the beginning of the end.
    I especially liked Tyson's destruction of Henry Tillman - who had bested him in the amateurs and prevented him from going on to the Olympics. I am pretty sure he clobbered him almost as quickly as he did Michael Spinks and Carl 'The Truth' Williams.

    As far as the Chavez - Whitaker fight goes, I actually rented that one on PPV and scored it myself. I remember having 'Sweet Pea' winning by 2 or 3 rounds..he was extremely elusive during the bout and Chavez was unable to cut off the ring on him consistently despite his best efforts. It was a close fight, but there is no doubt in my mind that King's influence over the WBC and the judges had an impact on the outcome. Almost every Boxing expert at the time scored the fight for Whitaker. I still have a copy of KO magazine from that time and the cover has a pic of the two of them in the ring with the caption 'SHAFTED! Outrage at the Alamodome '.
    I never liked Whitaker as a boxer or a person, but he WAS shafted in that fight. I am sure King was hoping to milk it and get a rematch..but it never happened.
    I agree with you on the Taylor - Chavez stoppage Eddie. Steele had no way of knowing there were only a few seconds remaining, but even if he did, he acted in the best interest of the fighter. Too bad for Taylor on that one, because he never really recovered and his career was all downhill after that.

    Anyways..have a good one !
    Last edited by OZZ; 12/09/2010 2:42pm at .
    " If one wants to have a friend one must also want to wage war for him: and to wage war one must be capable of being an enemy." - Fr. Nietzsche 'On The Friend' Thus Spake Zarathustra
  7. Snake Plissken is offline
    Snake Plissken's Avatar

    When I Get Back

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    11,559

    Posted On:
    12/09/2010 2:48pm

    supporting member
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Marley's Ghost View Post
    I especially liked Tyson's destruction of Henry Tillman - who had bested him in the amateurs and prevented him from going on to the Olympics. I am pretty sure he clobbered him almost as quickly as he did Michael Spinks and Carl 'The Truth' Williams.
    The Tillman fight was the "big step" after he lost to Buster. I remember the hype and the grainy video of the amateur fight. I though Tillman had a better chance then he actually ended up having, cuz he lasted 10 or 12 rounds with Smokin' Bert Cooper in the Cruiserweight Division.

    I recall Tillman flicking his jab and actually hitting Tyson with a halfway decent overhand right but it wasn't gonna end any other way then Tillman on his back.

    or, as Eddie posted....showing his "shoe ads".

    As far as the Chavez - Whitaker fight goes, I actually rented that one on PPV and scored it myself. I remember having 'Sweet Pea' winning by 2 or 3 rounds..he was extremely elusive during the bout and Chavez was unable to cut off the ring on him consistently despite his best efforts. It was a close fight, but there is no doubt in my mind that King's influence over the WBC and the judges had an impact on the outcome. Almost every Boxing expert at the time scored the fight for Whitaker. I still have a copy of KO magazine from that time and the cover has a pic of the two of them in the ring with the caption 'SHAFTED! Outrage at the Alamodome '.
    I never liked Whitaker as a boxer or a person, but he WAS shafted in that fight. I am sure King was hoping to milk it and get a rematch..but it never happened.
    I agree with you on the Taylor - Chavez stoppage Eddie. Steele had no way of knowing there were only a few seconds remaining, but even if he did, he acted in the best interest of the fighter. Too bad for Taylor on that one, because he never really recovered and his career was all downhill after that.

    Anyways..have a good one !
    Great fighters, great fights, great era in a great division.
    That's all you can say about most any of those title fights in the Jr Light-Jr Welters from the mid 80s-early 90's.
    Those same guys squaring off against each other producing some topshelf matches.

    Thanks to you and Eddie for reminding me of these
  8. winterwinter is offline

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    5

    Posted On:
    12/10/2010 12:11am


     Style: kongfu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    yup, very nice fighters for sure.
  9. Eddie Hardon is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,502

    Posted On:
    12/10/2010 9:57am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Trad Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Marley's Ghost View Post
    I think I was about as big a Tyson fan as one could get up until the rape conviction.. I have my own theory on that one, but that's another story..needless to say it was the beginning of the end.
    Anyways..have a good one !
    Agreed. Once I saw the TV Doc my view shifted...against him. I'm pretty sure I know what Teddy Atlas was thinking 'cos I'm quite sure I read an item in which he described Tyson's MO upon being requested for Autographs by attractive women. Then again, who knows of the temptations he received as World Champ? Did he delude himself on what was appropriate and inappropriate behaviour? Perhaps the line gets blurred...I'll leave it at that (cos I wasn't there).

    Moving on, the US T Bills I mentioned earlier. I recall reading that he had to cash them to pay Alan Dershowitz (sp?) to Defend him and hence he went Broke. A motive for the Comeback against Peter McNeeley, Bruce Seldon et al. (With useless cornermen...)

    Ah, The Don. "Only In America!". Always Entertaining and made some Great Fights. His Accountant (Joe Maffia - no, I'm not making that up) was quite enlightening. Still, I'm also at the end of "The Year Of The Locust" by Jon Hotten, re Fat Rick Parker and Tim Doc Anderson. Blimey. The underbelly of US Boxing. Wow.

    cheers
  10. OZZ is offline
    OZZ's Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    London,Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,241

    Posted On:
    6/13/2011 10:03am

    supporting member
     Style: Short Fist Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Induction ceremony was on the weekend..

    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/tyson-overc...203213043.html
    " If one wants to have a friend one must also want to wage war for him: and to wage war one must be capable of being an enemy." - Fr. Nietzsche 'On The Friend' Thus Spake Zarathustra
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.