221361 Bullies, 3920 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 21 to 24 of 24
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. jeane is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cleburne, Texas
    Posts
    64

    Posted On:
    12/02/2010 5:29pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Kyuki-do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have been reading all the posts. Thank you for the information.
  2. ChenPengFi is offline
    ChenPengFi's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Hawai'i
    Posts
    3,257

    Posted On:
    12/02/2010 7:07pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacked Frost View Post
    Plyometrics aren't a stepping stone to fitness though. You don't do plyos to get in shape, you get in shape to do plyos. They are a much more demanding exercise than a jump kick, and a beginner simply will lack the coordination and CNS efficiency to be able to make any effective use out of the movement. Again, it's an advanced training technique, and a beginner with ZERO strength foundation doesn't need to worry about power development, they need to worry about simply building their athleticism and maximal strength.

    Furthermore, she is being "worn out" by repetitive jumping, something that plyos doesn't teach, as it's simply 1-3 jumps with a 5 minute rest period. A jump rope is repetitive jumping, ala jumping jacks and jump kicks, but is also low impact and doesn't require a focus on maximal speed and perfect form as a plyometric would.

    Edit: Also, if she's unable to perform jumping jacks without getting worn out, she clearly doesn't have the conditioning to effectively perform something as high demand as plyos and get any benefit. There is no way she is going to be able to generate maximal speed for every jump, and instead is just going to be jumping in place with no real training benefit.

    As for the word "plyometrics" quoted in your post, again, nothing about plyos would give a trainee a high level of doms, primarily as a result of the low volume paired with incredibly low load beared by the body.

    I would not suggest plyos to ANY beginner trainee. Time invested in plyos is much better invested simply improving conditioning and athleticism. They're a power development exercise, and should be used as such.
    They can be a stepping stone to the (imo) more complex and form demanding jump kicks, as there are various levels of difficulty for the plyometrics.
    I think the problem is one of semantics, you are using a very narrow definition of plyometrics.
    I am referring to any of the types of exercises that work the eccentric>concentric stretch contraction.
    Jumprope loosely fits this description as seen here:
    http://www.elitetrack.com/article_fi...bettaplyos.pdf
    on page two.
    The caveats are listed quite well in that article as well.

    The quote in the previous article contends that plyometrics in general are known to cause DOMS, as an eccentric "heavy" exercise and i agree.

    Used wisely they can be quite safe and beneficial, heck kids play hopscotch.
  3. Emevas is offline
    Emevas's Avatar

    Dysfunctionally Strong

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Minot AFB, ND
    Posts
    6,791

    Posted On:
    12/02/2010 7:39pm

    supporting member
     Style: Boxing/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm aware of the what the article is saying, I am telling you I disagree with it, because the ecentric nature of the exercise wouldn't matter due to the low volume and high rest times.

    I am not using a narrow definition, but moreso the correct one. Plyometrics became mutated once they came to the west, and became some sort of bizzare conditioning hybrid where the entire emphasis on power development was abandoned and people just jumped on boxes for 2-3 minutes at a time. It retarded form and caused high levels of injuries.

    I wouldn't advocate plyometrics in any capacity for a beginner. There is no benefit, and time invested in it would be better served working on something else. If we're simply talking about eccentric>concentric stretch contraction exercises, and not a plyometric protocol, then, again, I would advocate jump rope, as it's a SPECIFIC exercise, rather than just saying "do plyometrics".

    And kids play hopscotch, yes. Kids DON'T worry about recruiting as many muscle fibers as possible, acheiving maximal speed, and maintaining perfect form. As I already said, I'm all for improving overall athleticism. In fact, I said that should be done BEFORE plyos. So yes, definitely play hopscotch, and any other pickup sport. Get active, become athletic, and THEN focus on improving your power.
    "Emevas,
    You're a scrapper, I like that."-Ronin69
  4. ChenPengFi is offline
    ChenPengFi's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Hawai'i
    Posts
    3,257

    Posted On:
    12/02/2010 8:02pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Hung Gar, Choy Lay Fut

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well put, thanks for taking the time.
    edit: Additionally, using those obviously more concise definitions i agree entirely.
    Last edited by ChenPengFi; 12/02/2010 8:06pm at .
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.