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  1. #11
    ChenPengFi's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    +1 on the 3 finger grip.
    I'm 40 and do min. 5 hrs. gi work/wk.
    I'm a massage therapist by trade, so finger and forearm care is a must for me.
    I tend not to fight for a grip too much to avoid damage, i'd rather try to transition to another grip if possible.
    I get my forearms worked on and use jao to help recovery.
    Tui Na, Shiatsu, Myofacial Release etc. all work for this stuff.
    There are Shiatsu warmup self massage routines out there that will likely benefit you.
    I have also found the dynamic tension exercises i learned in kung fu to help the hand flexibility, kinda like yoga for the fingers.

  2. #12

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    38, currently doing 3-4 1.5 hour sessions of Judo per week + 2 sessions of Stronglifts 5x5 (really should change my style field...). Never had much problem with pain in my forearms from training, but I recognize the stiff/achy fingers described by others in this thread - especially after newaza-heavy sessions.

    My main aches are (I guess) more related to stand-up wether it be randori or just technique practice - I have a bit of a problem relaxing (getting better, far to go), so my shoulders/upper arms and upper back tend to be quite messed up after that kind of session.

    Regards,
    Lars

  3. #13

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    I'm pretty relaxed in general. I had the same sort of pain when I did rock climbing too. Not that rock climbing is relaxing but you can't get very far rock climbing unless you are relaxed.

    HOWEVER, I will try any sort of different grip that takes less strength. Is there some technique to holding the Gi when people are trying to break your grip that causes less stress?
    My students have named my grip the web slinger grip as I only use my middle and ring finger to entangle the gi for a loose grip. I tend to not get into grip wars in my later years which I borrowed from my no gi techniques.

  4. #14
    jnp's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    While in guard, I tend to grip the tricep area with a cupped hand, or the seam on the tricep with my fingers more than bottom of the sleeve grips. If I am gripping the sleeves, it's always two on one until I break down their posture enough to get to some type of high guard clamp with my knees.

    Mostly though, I prefer underhooks and overhooks, just like no-gi.

    This may not apply to you, but if your grip is getting shredded from your sub defense, then I suggest tapping earlier to get the most out of your training time.

  5. #15
    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours. Join us... or die
    BKR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    So I wanted to survey the older guys (over 30) and see how your forearms are feeling and what you are doing about it. Ice, heat, drugs, stretches, exercises etc.

    I have a lot of tendon pain and tightness in my wrists and forearms especially after Gi class. I have a pre-existing injury in my right arm because I broke it and have a plate and screws in there that limit flexibility. My pain is specifically along the tendons and hurts more but feels better if I really rub the tendons about 2" back from my wrist.

    Anyone else?
    Not me

  6. #16

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I also experience pain and tightness in my wrists during gi or even no gi. I know it's a relaxation problem. I started taking the time to stretch my hands and forearms thoroughly before training and that solved the problem. If i don't stretch them, i get it almost every time. But im only 31 so i don't know if this helps.

  7. #17
    Vorpal's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My forearms are about the only place on my body that doesn't have pain (45). I keep a grip ball in my work car and constantly mash it when I'm stuck in traffic, and I'm in traffic a lot. I don't know if that's the reason but I'm glad I don't have that problem.

  8. #18

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A recent thread in the Physical Training forum might be worth a read. A lot of what is discussed there has some possible applicability to what is being discussed here.
    Treatment for forearm/elbow soreness? - No BS MMA and Martial Arts

  9. #19
    jnp's Avatar
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  10. #20
    W. Rabbit's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    So I wanted to survey the older guys (over 30) and see how your forearms are feeling and what you are doing about it. Ice, heat, drugs, stretches, exercises etc.

    I have a lot of tendon pain and tightness in my wrists and forearms especially after Gi class. I have a pre-existing injury in my right arm because I broke it and have a plate and screws in there that limit flexibility. My pain is specifically along the tendons and hurts more but feels better if I really rub the tendons about 2" back from my wrist.

    Anyone else?
    I'm 34 and I have a mixed CMA/grappling background (and old injuries), and now experience some of the same residual pain you describe after training, especially tendon soreness on the inside of my left forearm extending from the inner elbow out to my hand right to that 2" wrist spot (someone described this to me as "golf elbow" as opposed to tennis elbow). Coincidentally I also suffered a severe radius/ulna break on the same arm about 20 years ago. Seems like the constant punching, elbow movement, and grip exercises enflames some old injury, maybe a combination of the old break injury and the hung ga forearm/grip strengthening.

    I use a combination of jow and massage after training regularly now (3x per week), whether it hurts or not. If I don't follow this regimen I experience discomfort days after training, often when lifting certain things at the elbow. If I do follow it, I notice a lot less long term discomfort (probably due to the cooling effect of the jow and overall reduction of swelling) with longer lasting effects.

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