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  1. JAFMAS is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania IS
    Posts
    21

    Posted On:
    10/27/2010 10:43am


     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    How in God's name are you still benefitting from a linear progressive model after 30 years of training?
    Well, that's part of the point. The bodybuilding train to failure workouts I was following was pretty good in terms of staying in shape at my age (50) but really I didn't notice much progress in recent years in terms of strength gains, more mass, etc. I definitely hit a plateau, plus there wasn't really any functional strength derived from the "muscle comics" type workouts. I can easily say I was one of those people doing the same workouts with the same weights for several years. Once in a while I'd switch the exercises, but again, little to show for it.

    Doing a SS type lift focusing on the compound lifts only and eliminating crap like pulldowns, lateral raises, etc., I seriously have seen an improvement in strength and stamina.
  2. Res Judicata is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,642

    Posted On:
    10/27/2010 10:56am


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Jafmas -- you sound like a product of your time. Not a knock --that's how people trained in the 80s who came into weight training through bodybuilding. A lot of guys never changed (or even knew there were benefits to changing). It's not that unusual -- I know a guy who hasn't changed his routine (let alone periodization) in close to 20 years.
    You might like this article -- sounds like you a bit: http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_...der_to_bad_ass

    You should also check out this thread. Lots of older lifters have seriously screwed up mobility from years of training imbalances. http://tnation.t-nation.com/free_onl..._for_old_farts
  3. Emevas is offline
    Emevas's Avatar

    Dysfunctionally Strong

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Minot AFB, ND
    Posts
    6,791

    Posted On:
    10/27/2010 4:28pm

    supporting member
     Style: Boxing/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by JAFMAS View Post
    I can easily say I was one of those people doing the same workouts with the same weights for several years. Once in a while I'd switch the exercises, but again, little to show for it.
    I wouldn't classify this as a "bodybuilding style" training personally.
    "Emevas,
    You're a scrapper, I like that."-Ronin69
  4. JAFMAS is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania IS
    Posts
    21

    Posted On:
    11/01/2010 10:22am


     Style: Taekwondo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post
    Jafmas -- you sound like a product of your time. Not a knock --that's how people trained in the 80s who came into weight training through bodybuilding. A lot of guys never changed (or even knew there were benefits to changing). It's not that unusual -- I know a guy who hasn't changed his routine (let alone periodization) in close to 20 years.
    You might like this article -- sounds like you a bit: http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_...der_to_bad_ass

    You should also check out this thread. Lots of older lifters have seriously screwed up mobility from years of training imbalances. http://tnation.t-nation.com/free_onl..._for_old_farts
    You're exactly right. I wasn't familiar with programs like Starting Strength or Stronglifts. Over the years, every book or internet search for "strength training" brings you to the same old bodybuilding style routines.

    Primarily, I was working out just to stay in shape and every so often would change the exercises in my routine, etc., as again, the info I have been exposed to always suggested to change the routine a bit when you hit that plateau. Again though, I wasn't really going for a bodybuilding type of physique, just doing it to stay in shape.

    I'm not going to say that I wasted time by lifting this way for so many years as it kept me in good physical shape and kept my bodyfat to a minimum, but it didn't do much in terms of functional strength.
  5. groundbully is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    fairbanks, alaska
    Posts
    6

    Posted On:
    11/17/2010 2:19am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Wrestling/Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by 94m View Post
    Aright, I do not know the technical term for this, which may be the reason why I am having trouble finding more information on it. But, what is the name/type of program you can do to increase strength and not size? It is evident that some people have a better pound for pound strength than others, which is very usefull for wrestling or other sports that require you to make weight.
    Here is a description of pound for pound strength put into theory:
    If you train your muscles to produce the maximum amount of force they can at that body weight, you'll be able to run faster, jump higher, and make razor-sharp changes of direction a bigger guy with poor relative strength would be unable to duplicate (and he'd exhaust himself just trying).

    I think thats just stating the obvious, but from what little I've read it is more about increasing neural efficiency between your brain and the muscle, as opposed to the other option of gaining more muscle fibers so you can contract more weight.

    What do you guys know about this, and any advice on how to train for it as well? Thanks

    TL;DR Ways for gaining more strength pound-for pound.
    lift HEAVY for very low reps (5 or less)
    take a lot of supplements for meals
    i do this to increase my strength while staying around 165, the diet is very hard, youve gotta cut the junk out
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