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  1. NeilG is online now
    NeilG's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Saskatoon, Canada
    Posts
    1,381

    Posted On:
    9/29/2010 9:46am


     Style: Kendo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Clubs vary. We warm up with ground randori, switching partners every couple of minutes, no instruction unless you end up rolling with one of the instructors.
  2. judoka_uk is offline
    judoka_uk's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    England
    Posts
    4,619

    Posted On:
    9/29/2010 9:46am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by bigstu31s View Post
    I may be reading more in to this than I should be but after training BJJ I'm finding Judo very "stop start".
    The Judo club I go to is very small and only has a handfull of seniors so whenever you roll you have an instructor watching you at all times. Whilst this can be a good thing, almost like having a private lesson, the instructor will literally stop us everytime a little mistake is made and by the time he has explained it all you don't really get anytime to do proper randori either on the ground or standing.
    Their rationale behind this is that they want us to be more technical than physical. I guess I just enjoy physical more
    There is a problem when working with beginners that you see so many mistakes you want to correct them all all at once. This is a well meaning, but flawed approach. The old saying 'tell them everything, teach them nothing' is a telling one, the best approach when working with beginners is what's called in sports psychology - brief contact interventions - that is picking up the biggest error or flaw and consistently reminding and stressing correction of that error.

    Take for example a throw the biggest beginner problems with forward throws is not pulling high enough on the sleeve for long enough - ie maintaing kuzushi throughout tsukuri. Taking the brief contact intervention model you would when working with a beginner just concentrate on correcting and reminding them about the sleeve and leave everything else to another session. If they get the sleeve action right you say nothing except maybe encouragement if they get it wrong you remind them.

    Most Judo coaches haven't ever taken the time to think about how they teach or ways of teaching and just got into it through dint of being the only black belt in the town etc... The coaches who put the most thought into how they teach and maximising their teaching skills produce the best results, but these are sadly few and are between in Judo's amatuer culture.
  3. JudoSensei is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    62

    Posted On:
    9/29/2010 10:29pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by bigstu31s View Post
    I may be reading more in to this than I should be but after training BJJ I'm finding Judo very "stop start".
    The Judo club I go to is very small and only has a handfull of seniors so whenever you roll you have an instructor watching you at all times. Whilst this can be a good thing, almost like having a private lesson, the instructor will literally stop us everytime a little mistake is made and by the time he has explained it all you don't really get anytime to do proper randori either on the ground or standing.
    Their rationale behind this is that they want us to be more technical than physical. I guess I just enjoy physical more
    This is an unusual observation for most judo classes. Judo instruction places a high value on the experiential, real life, discover-for-yourself kind of learning. Most of us recognize that a lot of it you have to figure out for yourself, and that a well placed word from an instructor afterwards is worth a lot more than an interruption and lecture. You don't need to have every mistake and opportunity pointed out. I love teaching, but I purposely limit the talking during class, especially when students are active.
  4. madmonkey is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    united kingdom
    Posts
    341

    Posted On:
    10/19/2010 1:02pm


     Style: Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by bigstu31s View Post
    I may be reading more in to this than I should be but after training BJJ I'm finding Judo very "stop start".
    The Judo club I go to is very small and only has a handfull of seniors so whenever you roll you have an instructor watching you at all times. Whilst this can be a good thing, almost like having a private lesson, the instructor will literally stop us everytime a little mistake is made and by the time he has explained it all you don't really get anytime to do proper randori either on the ground or standing.
    Their rationale behind this is that they want us to be more technical than physical. I guess I just enjoy physical more
    This is exactly the problem I had when training at this club, although the instructors are all competent and very knowledgeable the teaching method did not allow enough time for relaxed practice between partners as they would constantly correct every little thing so you did not get IMHO enough of a feel for the technique.

    Another club I went to nearby was more sport focuse and due to having bigger dojo would have more randori and would also get out the crash mat to let people practise a throw with less fear of injurying uke through hesitation or poor technique, this would then be built up and the technique then used in randori.
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