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kronos
10/01/2002 2:33pm,
Has anyone here learn or know about that Japanese (i think) martial arts? any comments..opinions, pro-cons ??

Miguksaram
10/01/2002 2:52pm,
Shorinji Kempo (Shaolin Chuan-fa in Chinese) is the Japanese martial art formed by So Doshin in 1947. He studied Chinese martial arts in China while stationed there during WW2. The curriculm supposedly incumbers striking, kicking, throwing, pinning and locking. His main goal was to build up the fighting spirits of the Japanese after the fall of Japan in WW2.

I personally have never taken this system so I can't tell you too much about the curriculm. Those of you who are martial art film fanatics may remember Sony Chiba and the Street Fighter movies. He was a Shorinji Kempo practitioner.

Jeremy M. Talbott
http://www.homestead.com/koreanma/index.html
http://www.geocities.com/jns1994/MSA.html

patfromlogan
10/01/2002 3:47pm,
I am not belted,but have attended class occasionally because one of my kids is 1st dan this system. The style is fine- they have produced a few local tournament champs- they emphasize throws and rolls (on f##king hard wood floor!) and juijitsu type wrist control moves more than Shotokan, Wado, or Kyokushin do, or atleast the dojos that I practiced in. They also emphasize meditation and spirit/morals/attitude more than some.

kronos
10/02/2002 1:18am,
Yes..I have seen a bit of their "randori" and kumite in one of the SEA Games (South East Asia Games).

They have good joint locks I guess. They lack groundwork though...but this come from my observation of their "kumite"..they wear headgear, body protector and boxing gloves. It actually kinda funny...hehehehe (no offense intended :P~)

Anyway, did anybody know any good website on this style? (the non-mcdojo site only pls..hehehe :P~)

Gezere
10/02/2002 2:06am,
Kronos I think you are mixing Nihon Kempo with Shorinji Kempo.

I don't remember Shorinji kempo being part of teh SEA Games.

Shorinji Kempo is listed as a RELIGION more than a MA. I has HEAVY buddhist overtones and dan rank members actually become PRIESTS. Never seen them fight with Bogu.

Nihon Kempo is a SPORT also called Japanese Boxing. They were the Bogu you described. But they do have some ground work. I veiw Nihon Kempo as the layman's MMA. You are not going to get as hurt as you would in MMA but you got a somewhat similar enviorment.

Xiao Ao Jiang Hu Zhi Dong Fang Bu Bai (Laughing Proud Warrior Invinsible Asia) Emporer of Baji!!! THE FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE AGAINST THE UNITED AUSSIE FRONT!!

kronos
10/04/2002 12:33am,
Are you sure with this? As far as I remember, the Perkemi (Indonesian Brotherhood of Kempo) use the same swastika symbol like the one use by Shorinji ...and they do sent their fighters to the SEA Games.

Sorry..but do I missed something here? is there any relationship between Shorinji and Nihon Kempo?

Gezere
10/04/2002 8:34am,
There is no relationship between Shorinji and Nihon Kempo

The swastika symbol is a COMMON buddhist character and is not solely used but Shorinji Kempo Kenshin. Any school with heavy buddhist envolvement will feature this symbol.

Xiao Ao Jiang Hu Zhi Dong Fang Bu Bai (Laughing Proud Warrior Invinsible Asia) Emporer of Baji!!! THE FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE AGAINST THE UNITED AUSSIE FRONT!!

nos108
10/05/2002 9:49pm,
and it's not a f-ing swastika it is pointed in the opposite direction
ir's a buddhist symbol as Asia said that was around ages before hitle and the nazis

aikitattoo
10/06/2002 3:06pm,
The "backwards swastika" (I cant remember its real name.) is also seen in american indian ritual symbology. It is used to represent harmony with nature etc..

gaelicsolus
6/28/2005 2:27am,
I'll chime in here as a ShorinjiKempo kenshi. Most of what has been said here is accurate. Forwards or backwards, it's the same symbol. I've seen it used by Yoga schools and in other places. In ShorinjiKempo it's referred to as the Manji. It's no longer the official ShorinjiKempo symbol for Japan, which is now the same internationally and consists of two interlocking rings.

In ShorinjiKempo, yes, we do wear bogu, usually just the "do" part at practice. At randori meets nowadays there are new biohazard type helmets with transparent visors as well as big padded groin protectors below the do. Chances are, those white cotton gloves will be done away with entirely soon because they impede a lot of hand techniques, especially soft ones. We do roll and throw on hardwood floors but also on mats.

ShorinjiKempo literally translated into Mandarin is Shaolin Ji Ch'uan Fa but as an arbitrary difference of usage, this Chinese term usually refers to Shaolin kung fu or wu shu (non tournament wu shu, just the literal translation as wu=martial, ats=shu.) In some threads like this, the more educated posters (your truly not included) ask what characters are used for the style's name. Well, as of April 2005 I can tell you that ShorinjiKempo uses no kanji for its name any more but Roman letters. This is because the Shaolin Temples in China have copyrighted the character for "Shaolin" or "Shaolin Temple" and ShorinjiKempo itself is registered under the Roman letters name. ShorinjiKempo kept its name because, I am told, of good relations with the Shaolin Temples.

I personally think that ShorinjiKempo was a terrible name to choose for a very specific martial art, because not only does it get confused as only the Japanese name for Shaolin Ji Ch'uan Fa, but also gets confused with other arts to which the term "kenpo" applies: the arena of Nihon Kempo (in which the gear looks similar to ShorinjiKempo but also to the equipment that Chotoku Kyan and his students used for sparring); Kyosho Ryu Kenpo Karate, Kara Ho Kempo Karate, Ed Parker's American Kempo Karate, and usually the short name for a lot of schools of Kajukenbo, which also get "Kung Fu," "Ch'uan Fa," and goodness what else applied because so many different styles exist; Okinawan karate (in fact, e.g. the Matsumura Shorin Ryu club in Seattle also calls its style Matsumura kenpo,) which is the same as Ryukyu kenpo, Okinawan te, tode, tote, Karate Jutsu, ti, and whatever other variations have come up over the years. Choosing a name for these styles is, from what I can tell, totally arbitrary.

In Indonesia, ShorinjiKempo is so popular (they boast, I believe, the largest number of branches per country in the world) that it goes against the norm of ShorinjiKempo and is practiced as a national sport. I don't know if it is affiliated with any of those leagues that have been mentioned as I don't know much about the Indonesian federation.

Paired practice is the most important part of the physical curriculum. Both striking techniques and soft techniques, which include a lot of joint locks, takedowns/pins, and throws, are practiced this way. Forms are short and all have corresponding partner forms. I think the number of forms totals ten or twelve. ShorinjiKempo contains over 600 techniques. It is a pretty concise system and does not include much in the way of lethal techniques, part of its philosophy.

Where the techniques of ShorinjiKempo come from are anybody's guess. The official background of the martial art is not very specific. Doshin So did study Hakko Ryu Jujutsu, which was a branch from Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu. Hakko Ryu included even softer application of techniques and less lethality than Daito Ryu (which contains over 2,800 techniques apparently,) as well as resuscitation techniques, which are all found in ShorinjiKempo. The son of Doshin So's teacher in Hakko Ryu states that Doshin So combined Hakko Ryu and Nihon Kempo. I don't know whether this means he included the idea of the sport of Nihon Kempo or if Doshin So himself competed in Nihon Kempo for a time.

Doshin So reports to have studied various styles in China but most of all Yi Ho Ch'uan, the primary style of the "boxers" in the "Boxer Rebellion." I have never seen this style so I don't know how much if any of it filtered down to ShorinjiKempo.

A cursory look at the striking techniques in ShorinjiKempo might suggest that they are very divergent from the hard linear techniques of, for example, some styles of karate such as Shotokan, Shorinji Ryu, or Shito Ryu. Specifically, the vertical fist and torque of the upper body stand out. However, if one looks at the Shorinji Ryu karate styles of Chotoku Kyan, one can see similarities there. One of Kyan's students, Kori Hisataka, also taught Doshin So. Maybe the karate influence, maybe the kung fu influence, maybe both, are apparent in the strikes of ShorinjiKempo.

Doshin So also lived with his grandfather at a young age. His grandfather knew iaido and kyudo and a couple other forms of martial arts.

ShorinjiKempo over all is a soft style but mostly external, emphasizing speed and technique over conditioning or physical strength. If it is lacking anywhere it is in wrestling/ground work and it doesn't have footstomps, from what I can tell. Striking techniques are, I believe, almost always done with hip motion and full expansion of the shoulders if they're not leg techniques. Elbow strikes, knee strikes, head butts, and body weight attacks are included.

The curriculum is very systematic and metered. What I can say for sure is, no matter the specifics of Doshin So's own training, and no matter which styles' techniques actually ended up in ShorinjiKempo modified or intact, the curriculum is set up very logically and balanced and there are new techniques to learn at every level. This is characteristic of the style, whereas, with other styles, I find that a specific teaching curriculum is more characteristic of a particular school. This has its plusses and minuses of course.

Ronin
6/28/2005 6:36am,
Shorinji Kempo BB get to wear cool tunics.

patfromlogan
6/28/2005 9:32am,
Any school that does rolls and throws on hardwood floors is cool in my book. The last testing I watched was funny as hell. Doing all the basics, the front row of students goes first, then the second and so on. The front row was all black or brown and the last row was white going for yellow. As each row did their rolls it got louder and louder (ouch! All those heads and elbows smacking the floor). The Sensei stopped the test laughing and talked how the last couple rows sounded like drums beating.

Ryno
6/29/2005 9:59am,
There was a Shorinji Kempo group based in the Vallejo (San Francisco east bay) area by the name of "Asian Knights" a few years back. It was a very hardcore group, and their attitude didn't really jive with what gaelicsolus was talking about. I'm not sure if they were some kind of regional anomoly due to the rough neighborhood, or what, but these guys had a reputation as real fighters. Many competed in boxing and kickboxing on the side, and were pretty formidable.

My first instructor, by the name of Rich Naval was from this group. He was a small guy but quick as hell, and he was just a hellacious fighter. From what I saw of him, the system seemed to have your basic karate type moves, but he also showed what they called "the tricks", which were really just dirty jiujitsu style street fighting moves. Locks, throws, eye gouges, stuff like this. Not a whole heck of a lot of pure ground work that I saw, but I didn't get very far in the system.

As a system, it was OK, but the attitude that these guys had in training was pretty fierce, especially for a predominantly striking system. They'd go all-out at each other, very old school style. Lots of bloody noses and broken knuckles, but they'd just keep going. Now, I'm not sure if this was a Shorinji Kempo thing, or just this Asian Knights club doing their own interpretation.

Cato
7/01/2005 2:27pm,
ShorinjiKempo over all is a soft style but mostly external, emphasizing speed and technique over conditioning or physical strength. If it is lacking anywhere it is in wrestling/ground work and it doesn't have footstomps, from what I can tell.



Good summary of shorinjikempo! But what you call footstomps (if it is what I think it is) is teached to whitebelts as a finishing move after a throw and lock, for example ude juji gatame-tate gassho gatame.

Shorinjiryu1024
7/04/2005 12:01am,
I have some knowledge on SK as well as i've been doing it for about 7 years or so. And am a 1kyu if that means anything. gaelicsolus was pretty spot on. SK emphasizes on speed and technique, lots of jointlocks, and a vertical fist in striking. Its provided me with a good base for my muay thai training because of the emphasis on weight distribution and technique. Good philosophy behind it. Yet as soon as I started muay thai and boxing I ditched the vertical fist and the only moves I still keep from it would be the feint kicks, spinning kicks, and side kicks.

If you have any questions I'd be happy to answer em.

Kimpatsu
7/15/2005 8:37pm,
Shorinji Kempo (Shaolin Chuan-fa in Chinese) is the Japanese martial art formed by So Doshin in 1947. He studied Chinese martial arts in China while stationed there during WW2. The curriculm supposedly incumbers striking, kicking, throwing, pinning and locking. His main goal was to build up the fighting spirits of the Japanese after the fall of Japan in WW2.

I personally have never taken this system so I can't tell you too much about the curriculm. Those of you who are martial art film fanatics may remember Sony Chiba and the Street Fighter movies. He was a Shorinji Kempo practitioner.

Jeremy M. Talbott
http://www.homestead.com/koreanma/index.html
http://www.geocities.com/jns1994/MSA.html
I am a Shorinji Kenshi, and can answer any questions you may have about the art. What would you like to know?