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new2tkd
9/01/2007 8:06am,
Anyone know the Korean symbols for the following words or where i can find the symbols:

Strength
Honor
Perserverance
Courage

kwoww
9/01/2007 9:37am,
By "symbols" do you mean the Korean phonetic translation (Hangul) or the Chinese characters (Hanja)?

Or do you not know the difference? I didn't know Korean was phonetic until, like... this year.

new2tkd
9/01/2007 9:51am,
By "symbols" do you mean the Korean phonetic translation (Hangul) or the Chinese characters (Hanja)?

Or do you not know the difference? I didn't know Korean was phonetic until, like... this year.


the characters is what i meant...like the characters to the right of this post on the bullshido page...i couldn't think of the word....please excuse my ignorance...

new2tkd
9/01/2007 10:06am,
Or do you not know the difference? I didn't know Korean was phonetic until, like... this year.


And no, i don't know the difference...

kwoww
9/01/2007 10:09am,
Nah it's cool. I don't know them myself...

Strength: 实力
Honor: 荣誉
Perseverance: 毅力
Courage: 勇气

that's what Google (English -> Simplified Chinese) gave me, but there's no Chinese -> English so I can't crosscheck it or anything. I guess we'll just have to wait for Errant or someone equally versed in Asian languages. It's probably horribly wrong, anyway.

kwoww
9/01/2007 10:18am,
I found an English to Hanja dictionary online (Declan's Korean Dictionary 1.1) and this is what I got:

Strength: 強大 ("strength"), 力 ("strength, power"), 強力 ("great physical strenght, power, might"), 內剛 ("inner strength"), 人力 ("human strength"), 自力 ("one's own strength"), 體力 ("physical strength/stamina"), 剛氣 ("fortitude, strength of character"), or 剛斷 ("the strength of one's mind").

Honor: 榮光 ("honor, glory"), 榮譽 ("honor, distinction"), 體面 ("honor, prestige"), 名譽 ("glory, honor, fame, reputation"), or 右 ("right, right side, honor").

Perseverance: 忍耐 ("patience, perseverance, endurance"), 毅 ("perseverance"), or 忍耐心 ("patience, perseverance").

Courage: 膽力 ("courage, pluck, nerve"), 勇 ("courage, concentrated effort"), 膽略 ("courage and resourcefulness"), or 勇氣 ("bravery, courage").

So as you can see, the difference lies mostly in connotation, and as such you should probably either ask someone who knows the language or, slightly less preferable, pick the one with the connotation you like best.

new2tkd
9/01/2007 11:24am,
I must have a setting on my computer that doesn't let me see the characters....all thats coming out for every character are square blocks....you wouldn't happen to be fluent in computer language also? LOL...

kwoww
9/01/2007 11:41am,
I must have a setting on my computer that doesn't let me see the characters....all thats coming out for every character are square blocks....you wouldn't happen to be fluent in computer language also? LOL...

What's your operating system?

If you have WinXP:

Open up the Control Panel
Dig out your Windows XP installation disk.
If you're in Classic mode (white background) open up "Regional and Language Options." If you're in Category mode (grey background) open up "Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options" then go to "Regional and Language Options."
Go to the "Languages" tab.
Check "Install Files for East Asian languages." (might as well do complex script for good measure)
Follow the on-screen directions.

new2tkd
9/01/2007 11:44am,
Thanks....i got it now....

so how does this work? Korean characters used Chinese characters? Trying to learn something here....thanks for the help

DSL
9/01/2007 12:56pm,
Korean uses Chinese for names and such, but things like those they'd actually use Hangul.
They'll often use Chinese for like names on documents, sometimes martial styles etc, but most things now are in Korean other than those, and simplified Chinese isn't.

Strength = 힘 (heem)
Honor = 명예 (yong yoeh)
Perseverance = 강인성 (kahng eem jong)
Courage = 용기 (yong gee)

If it's on certificates, I'd ask a local Korean native on which would be more appropriate, and older one ;p.

ToUnderstand
9/01/2007 3:54pm,
Honor = 명예 (yong yoeh)

Since when did Mee um give a yo sound its Myung Yae not Yong Yoeh... if im wrong shoot me 2 years of saturdays stolen from me by Hangul Haggyo never payed off.

Ronin.74
9/01/2007 5:21pm,
Since when did Mee um give a yo sound its Myung Yae not Yong Yoeh... if im wrong shoot me 2 years of saturdays stolen from me by Hangul Haggyo never payed off.

Don't worry no one's going to shoot you, you are correct it's Myung Yae

DSL
9/01/2007 5:27pm,
Rofl, teaches me to read it in 7 point type!
Completely correct, I had read it as the silent i-ung (sp?) (the one that looks like an 'o').

kwoww
9/01/2007 6:47pm,
mieum and ieung look really similar in small sans-serif fonts.

Craigypooh
9/01/2007 6:59pm,
As I understand it the Koreans didn't have their own written language until the 15th century and used chinese characters until then. There's a nice history here: http://www.declan-software.com/korean.htm

kwoww
9/01/2007 7:05pm,
Speaking of Declan Software... (lol that's where the Korean dictionary I used came from. i'm also teaching myself Korean with that Korean HakGyo program they've got. Good stuff.)

But yeah, Korean is a bit like modern Hebrew in that it was entirely fabricated, except modern Korean is about 300 years older than Hebrew IIRC.