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View Full Version : If you had a chance to learn Aiki-Jujitsu in Japan, would you?








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sharpacid
3/10/2007 4:02pm,
Now before I get any comments right off the bat, I read every single article and searched the threads about Aikido and Aiki-Jujitsu (AJ)...I understand what the general consesus is and I agree 100%...however, people mentioned that the only real place to learn "original" Aiki-Jujitsu is in Japan...

Now the sensei that sort of supervises our Jui Jitsu club, is a black belt in Japanese JJ and AJ. We got the talking and I found out a couple of things about AJ. THERE ARE NO MAGIC PANTS in his school. He said that a regular JJ GI is just fine.

He said that there is no weird training with multiple opponents...He descriped it as mostly wrist and joint locks in order to subdue an opponent without necessarily breaking any bones. He described it as something similar to police restraint techniques etc....This all sounds interesting, but I really don't want to waste my time because I am focusing on JuiJitsu and the MMA clubs...a second martial art might be too much stuff at once. This is where I need your advice guys....

PS. He also mentioned that I am the only foreigner that he offered this too...this is a traditional martial art, and is generally not taught to "outsiders". So I was kind of flattered.....So I don't want to try it and then not do it at the risk of offending him. I want to decide beforehand so please give me some help:)

Goju - Joe
3/10/2007 4:11pm,
Every time I see an Aiki-jujitsu thread I think that it might show Aikido trained properly as I see it with proper strikes, grappling and throws as well as sporting orientated competition to hone those skills.

Every time I click a link, watch a video or look at pictures I am extremely disappointed.

WorldWarCheese
3/11/2007 12:10am,
First off don't bother. Second: You're not the first foreigner who got in because he wouldn't let anyone else in, you're the first because you're the first he's seen. They do this, trust me. "Ooooh you a WHITEY, well we generally DON'T let people in but, since I tell you EXTREMELY GIFTED I make exception!"</asian accent>

Virus
3/11/2007 4:40am,
Don't bother. Most likely it consists of doing standing armlocks against non-resistant partners like pretty much all classical JJ.

Virus
3/11/2007 4:41am,
Every time I see an Aiki-jujitsu thread I think that it might show Aikido trained properly as I see it with proper strikes, grappling and throws as well as sporting orientated competition to hone those skills.


You mean MMA?

shmuel
3/11/2007 6:47am,
Now the sensei that sort of supervises our Jui Jitsu club, is a black belt in Japanese JJ and AJ. We got the talking and I found out a couple of things about AJ. THERE ARE NO MAGIC PANTS in his school. He said that a regular JJ GI is just fine.



What stye of Aikijujutsu is he teaching?

Matter of fact, what is the name of the Japanese jujutsu style he's teaching?

glad2bhere
3/11/2007 12:41pm,
The Hapkido community regularly discusses this vert issue. Not just because there is suppose to be a connection between AJJ and Hapkido, but also because there is a good deal of racism that suggests that the guy with the epicanthic fold to his eyes someone how has special insight into what he does. If we are real honest with ourselves there are only a limited number of reasons a person wants to go to a foreign country to learn an art.

1.) The first seems to be bragging rights. There is something to be said for having gotten your training as close to "ground zero" as you can. When it comes time to open your MA emporium on Main street in Nowhere USA, you get a lot more mileage out of having been taught by a recognized name or at an exotic location rather than at the local YMCA.

2.) Some people actual love the culture they want to train in. This means that even if they did not train they would still want to be in that culture and enjoy its values, copy its behaviors, learn its cuisine and so forth.

3.) Some people just need something for their vitae. It looks good to be able to show that you went to another country and noone will ever really be able to find out what you did and with whom--- "What happens in Hokkaido, stays in Hookaido", right? So if I come back to the US and tell everyone that I was kidnapped by mountain goblins and was accepted into their inner circle of extraordinary martial tradions who is going to know, right?

Commercial martial arts has become a "dirty contract" in which a traveler agrees to provide the money if the personality in the foreign land will provide the right kind of desired paper. Fact is that with the exception of the demo groups for a given art, practitioners and teachers around the world are actually all pretty much the same. Further you have no better chance of finding a good teacher in Asia than you will in the USA. As a matter of fact it may be harder since its a pretty well-known fact that most traditions are not crazy about having outsiders come in for a while and then leave. Look at the KODOKAI, yes?

Best Wishes,

Bruce

WorldWarCheese
3/11/2007 3:12pm,
That is, unless you want to train at the Kodokan or for arts that aren't really available outside of Japan such as Daido Juku and programs like Ichigeki which has, I think, a school in Portugal and Russia aside from the Tokyo Dojo. Kodokan has Yamashita and Kosen Masters, that's the best reason to go. Yamashita's one of the best coaches there is and is the closest thing to Kimura one can get with Judo. Daido Juku has very few true blue places outside of Japan because we already have a lot of MMA places. And Ichigeki is only for the Kyokushin guy wanting to get into K-1 and MMA and will help him/her/it adjust.

Aside from those, I see no reason aside from bragging or LARPing one would want to spend the incredible amount of money traveling to and living in Japan costs. (Ask Mongo)

Even then Mayo Quanshi's only a step below Kodokan and there's an okay Daido Juku in NY set last year...

(Tangent: Ichigeki 2006: 14 Kyokushin vs 14 K-1 Kickboxers, 7 with kickboxing rules, 7 with Knockdown Karate rules. Kyokushin sweeps the board with 14 victories over the kickboxers.)

sharpacid
3/11/2007 5:44pm,
I think some of you guys misunderstand my question....

I currently AM living in Japan...Okinawa specifically. And like I said I befriended an AJ instructor. I am already learning JuiJitsu (with gi and without) as well as some striking (MMA club). I do not know what style specifically of AJ the sensei teaches, but I will have to ask. Anyways, my question was would you guys advise me to learn AJ while I am in Japan?
I am personally thinking no as it would take time away from my newaza, but his description of AJ made me interested. (no magic pants was a first sign that its a little different).

Plasma
3/11/2007 5:53pm,
I think some of you guys misunderstand my question....

I currently AM living in Japan...Okinawa specifically. And like I said I befriended an AJ instructor. I am already learning JuiJitsu (with gi and without) as well as some striking (MMA club). I do not know what style specifically of AJ the sensei teaches, but I will have to ask. Anyways, my question was would you guys advise me to learn AJ while I am in Japan?
I am personally thinking no as it would take time away from my newaza, but his description of AJ made me interested. (no magic pants was a first sign that its a little different).

The only ryu-ha I know that uses Aikijujutsu to describe its unarmed combat is Daito-ryu.

WorldWarCheese
3/11/2007 7:45pm,
Well, if you're already there, give it a trial class (if you can get one) if it suits yer fancy do it. But be wary and if you think it'll take away from yer Jiujitsu then I'd say **** it.

Fitz
3/12/2007 1:31am,
Anyways, my question was would you guys advise me to learn AJ while I am in Japan?

If you've got the time and interest to do it I don't see why not. Even if you only learn the basics and then don't stick with it further you might still pick up some new methods and ways of looking at body mechanics.

Find out what is is that he is teaching though. Daito-ryu is the grand-daddy art of nearly all Aiki forms but a few arts that call themselves "Aikijutsu" are really Aikido lineages with more of a practical orientation, or at least that is what they'd like to think. If it is a Daito-ryu line give it a shot and see how much you enjoy it and how useful you find it.

glad2bhere
3/12/2007 7:48am,
Not sure this is going to come out right but I throw it out FWIW.

If I were going to go to a foreign country to learn a martial tradition I think I would make it a high priority to get as close to the source as possible. For instance, there are a number of arts in Korea which supposedly trace their origins, at least in part, back to Chinese and Japanese sources. That being the case I don't know that I would go to Korea to learn the Korean version of the Japanese art, say. Taken a step farther, I also am not sure that if I DID go to Japan that I would necessarily settle for training at the first school I bumped into on my trip from the airport. As far as I am concerned PREPARATION is huge when it comes to going to another country, and the idea of simply showing up on someone's doorstep and kneeling in the snow until they let you in only works in the movies. Though it does not get talked about a lot, some cultures don't necessarily fall all over themselves accepting round-eyes into their training regardless of how much money you have to throw around. FWIW.

Best Wishes,

Bruce

Feryk
3/12/2007 5:01pm,
To the OP:

1.) Do you want to learn more TMA? If so, then take your Sensei up on his offer. You will learn something, whether or not it is MMA applicable. If you only want MMA training, then pass.

2.) Good TMA's tend to be closed circles. Some clubs are invite only. Some of those clubs train very hard. They don't want to waste their time with casual students. You may find that this will open up other doors to you as well. Just a thought.

Sushi-Boy
3/12/2007 11:28pm,
Does anybody know any Daito-ryu schools in London, England?

I would love to watch a class to check it out.

Sushi-Boy
3/12/2007 11:35pm,
I checked out www.daito-ryu.org but only found Schools in Japan, USA, Canada, Hong Kong with the only European club being in Holland.