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Sprite
8/12/2003 3:15pm,
As anyone trained in Shorinjiryu karate before?

If yes, what do you think of it compared to other karate styles or other martial arts in general?

tallpaul50
8/12/2003 4:50pm,
I, personally, haven't trained in it, but I havwe a friend that got his black belt in it last year, and I've worked out witrh him several times.

It seems to be a good, well rounded system to me. I don't say this about to many styles that I've seen,

He who dies with the most toys...still DIES!

Mark V.
12/27/2004 7:15pm,
Yes, I have trained in Shorinjiryu Karate. But, which one do you refure to?
The Shorinjiryu that I train in is from the Shorinjiryu of Kaiso Kori Hisataka (Born in Shuri, Okinawa on the 22nd of April 1907, passed away on the 14th of Augtust 1988).
After he came back from China, he found the Japanese people demoralized after being defeated during the war. He founded a School of Karate which he called Shorinjiryu Kenkokan (1945 Fukoka prefecture, Kyushu). He named the school after the three main influences of his training: Okinawan Shorinjiryu Karate (tode) Kensei Master Anhoh Asato and Master Chotoku Kyan, Chinese Shorinjiryu Kempo, Kudakaryu Karate Jitsu/Ryukyu Kudaka jima Shishiryu bo jutsu.

Karate from this lineage consists of the usual punching, striking, kicking, takedowns/throwing, and controling techniques such as joint locking, strangling, choking. The basics come from the techniques of Kensei Ankoh Asato, the kata from Shorinji kempo, Hakkyoku kempo and Hinomoto Rykyu Kudaka Bojitsu as well as Kaiso Kisataka's own experences.

Though many other techniques are employed, when punching, the fist is usually vertical so as not to lock the shoulder joint, this also reduces stress on the elbow joint. When kicking the heel is often employed when executing a front kick and the ball of the foot is used rather the instep or shin when executing a round house. Most of the techniques are circular, very few techniques are linear. Most employ changing position and moving around your patner particularly using a triangular piviting step.

One of the major forms of training is the practice of yakusoku randori kumite which are the result of Kaiso's Chinese Kempo training. Nine of these are based on the used of sankakutobi (triangular piviting stepping).

Kasio also emphisised the development of technique through the use single practice, paired practice, group practice where one faces various partners one at a time or several at a time, and free sparing.

Please note that there is a difference between Shorinjiryu and Koshiki karate. Shorinjiryu is a complete system based on the development of the individual in mind, body and spirit. Koshiki Karate is the sports side of Shorinjiryu, using Anzen bogu as protection.


Hopefully this has helped answer some of your questions. Good luck Sprite!

Mark V.

Judah Maccabee
12/27/2004 8:01pm,
Seeing as how Sprite asked that question almost 18 months ago, I think they aren't around to see the answer.

WELCOME TO BULLSHIDO

Mark V.
12/27/2004 11:43pm,
Happy New year Samurai_Steve.Nice to have arrived.

Mark V.

patfromlogan
11/30/2005 11:04am,
I happen to know that Sprite was sitting on the edge of his computer chair waiting for the answer.

ArmchairNinja
12/02/2005 11:00am,
Now that this thread has been resurrected, I might as well add my 2c. I used to train Shorinjiryu Renshinkan Karatedo over-zealously (10-15h/week) for about 5 years (I quit last year). The style emphasizes kicks (about 70%) and kumite is full-contact, albeit with too much protective gear for my taste. The founder of the style, Isamu Tamotsu, was a very proficient fighter and this was reflected in techniques being for the most part straighforward and practical. After Isamu died in 2000, his son Iwao took over and things have been slipping downhill ever since. The new soke seems more interested in aesthetics than functionality, and on top of that he runs the organization like Hitler ran Germany. I can't really recommend this style to anyone today, it's becoming more and more like dancing. From a practical point of view it can't compete with modern styles, and it doesn't have a lineage that would satisfy history freaks.

train4real
3/07/2008 12:45pm,
Now that this thread has been resurrected, I might as well add my 2c. I used to train Shorinjiryu Renshinkan Karatedo over-zealously (10-15h/week) for about 5 years (I quit last year). The style emphasizes kicks (about 70%) and kumite is full-contact, albeit with too much protective gear for my taste. The founder of the style, Isamu Tamotsu, was a very proficient fighter and this was reflected in techniques being for the most part straighforward and practical. After Isamu died in 2000, his son Iwao took over and things have been slipping downhill ever since. The new soke seems more interested in aesthetics than functionality, and on top of that he runs the organization like Hitler ran Germany. I can't really recommend this style to anyone today, it's becoming more and more like dancing. From a practical point of view it can't compete with modern styles, and it doesn't have a lineage that would satisfy history freaks.


Have you ever trained or competed in japan tournaments?