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View Full Version : Did Bruce Lee really plagirize his works?



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Otacon_01
8/01/2005 12:02am,
I'm not sure how many times I've read this on message boards. I'm not sure I've ever actually seen a source, either. I did a little search (google) for myself after getting into an argument over it, but was unable to find much. I need more to really confirm it. So, I came here. I did a search for "plagirize" and got nothing.

Does anyone know where I could go to find some info?

Many thanks in advance.

EternalRage
8/01/2005 12:04am,
What do you mean plagarize? You mean like in his books or his philosophy crap or what? If you're asking if he ripped stuff from other systems, well, yes he did. I don't think he documented himself as making it up, but he did take stuff here and there after he realized _ing _un wasn't t3h d34dly...

Otacon_01
8/01/2005 12:07am,
I'm refering to his books his books and philosophies. No, of course not his fighting style. JKD is taking what works for one and using it to one's will, so you're bound to use elements from other styles in it.

Bard of DorAr
8/01/2005 12:08am,
I don't see it so much as plagarism as either 1: It's a personal journal so who cares. Or 2: He was sort of dishonest in that he didn't give credit.

He didn't ever personally claim any philosophy he stated was his, other people just kind of assume such.

Otacon_01
8/01/2005 12:14am,
Or 2: He was sort of dishonest in that he didn't give credit.

That's what I'm talking about.


He didn't ever personally claim any philosophy he stated was his, other people just kind of assume such.


Well, when you don't say "so and so once said...", what else is the ignorant (not an insult) person to believe?

Samfoo
8/01/2005 12:19am,
Do you have any specific instance where you think he plagarized someone else's work? Who was he not giving credit to?

I do not think that he plagarized his work personally. And frankly, I think if he had there would have been some form of legal action against his estate already since its quite lucrative from a financial standpoint.

Otacon_01
8/01/2005 12:31am,
http://boards.gamefaqs.com/gfaqs/genmessage.php?board=212&topic=22544773

You can find my argument there, but I think it's mostly been trumpped. I didn't know he meant for the Tao of JKD to not be published.

Lampa
8/01/2005 12:32am,
Plaigarism is such a nebulous term. Like his style of fighting, Bruce Lee borrowed and combined ideas from other sources to form everything he wrote. This combining and building of ideas from past sources is how all martial arts, and all human endevours, expand and advance.

Personally, the only thing that can be considered plaigarism is copying large amounts of text from another source, verbatum, without any attribution to the original source. If anything else counts as plaigarism than everything is. And, as far as I can tell, Bruce Lee never copied large amounts of text, verbatum, without any attribution.

Samfoo
8/01/2005 12:36am,
http://boards.gamefaqs.com/gfaqs/genmessage.php?board=212&topic=22544773

You can find my argument there, but I think it's mostly been trumpped. I didn't know he meant for the Tao of JKD to not be published.

Ugg, I'm not going to slog through a Gamefaqs thread for what is a questionable claim at best.

Can you just post your evidence here? Or do you even have evidence?

feedback
8/01/2005 12:38am,
Are you really a ****? COULD BE

Samfoo
8/01/2005 12:43am,
Just so we're all on the same page, plagiarism as defined by Black's Law Dictionary:

plagiarism. The deliberate and knowing presentation of another person's original ideas or creative expressions as one's own. Generally, plagiarism is immoral but not illegal. If the expression's creator gives unrestricted permission for its use and the user claims the expression as original, the user commits plagiarism but does not violate copyright laws. If the original expression is copied without permission, the plagiarist may violate copyright laws, even if credit goes to the creator. And if the plagiarism results in material gain, it may be deemed a passing-off activity that violates the Lanham Act. Cf. INFRINGEMENT

Otacon_01
8/01/2005 12:44am,
Are you really a ****? COULD BE


What?


Here's what I've found thus far.

From: otacon 01 | Posted: 7/31/2005 11:48:14 PM | Message Detail
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0809231948/103-4539920-0747816?v=glance

also

"Wisdom does not consist of trying to wrest the good from the evil but in learning to "ride" them as a cork adapts itself to the crests and troughs of the waves." This quote was plagiarized by Bruce Lee for an essay he submitted to the University of Washington at Seattle. The actual source of the quote is Alan Watts' book "This Is It" (1959).

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Bruce_Lee

That should get you started.
---
Riley Miller is the most beautiful girl in the third dimension.


From: otacon 01 | Posted: 7/31/2005 11:54:03 PM | Message Detail
His ideas are mirrored in the writings of The Beatles and Bruce Lee, and credited by them in their work. (Bruce Lee's philosophical writings can be indistinguishable from Krishnamurti's at times.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Krishnamurti


There's another. I'm not very knowledgable in the subject. Other members of the board know more about it than me.


---
Riley Miller is the most beautiful girl in the third dimension.


Pathetic, I know. That's why I came here.

Samfoo
8/01/2005 12:44am,
"Plagiarism, which many people commonly think has to do with copyright, is not in fact a legal doctrine. True plagiarism is an ethical, not a legal, offense and is enforceable by academic authorities, not courts. Plagiarism occurs when someone -- a hurried student, a neglectful professor, an unscrupulous writer -- falsely claims someone else's words, whether copyrighted or not, as his own. Of course, if the plagiarized work is protected by copyright, the unauthorized reproduction is also a copyright infringement." Paul Goldstein, Copyright's Highway 12 (1994).

"That the supporting evidence for the accusation of plagiarism may on occasion be elusive, insufficient, or uncertain, is not the same as thinking that the definition of plagiarism is uncertain. The gray areas may remain resistant to adjudication without being resistant to definition. It may be perfectly clear what constitutes plagiarism ('using the work of another with an intent to deceive') without its being clear that what faces us is truly a case of this." Christopher Ricks, "Plagiarism," in 97 Proceedings of the British Academy 149, 151 (1998).

Samfoo
8/01/2005 12:51am,
Bruce Lee didn't have any philosophical work. He basically had a personal book report on Eastern philosophies and took note on what he liked. What is there to plagerize?

MA wise, the stuff clearly belonged to other systems. I dont think he claimed to have invented everything. Especially as it was just his personal notes for the most part.

Agreed and well put.

Otacon_01
8/01/2005 12:56am,
Well, there is the one book that I brought into mention, but it would seem that he included a bibliography.

Regardless, I was unaware that The Tao of JKD was never meant to be published. Bearing that in mind, I don't think I have much of an argument anymore, as it wasn't his fault. Thanks.

JKDChick
8/01/2005 1:24am,
The Tao is just unedited notes. It was going to become a book at some point. Then that whole "death" thing got in the way.