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View Full Version : Bio of "Duke" Moore, 1915 - 2003 "Survival is everything...all else is trivial."








patfromlogan
6/26/2004 8:59am,
I was reading about Mas Oyama's travels in the US and came on some info on Duke Moore. I'm adding this to History as this guy was a pioneer cross trainer and teacher. His students include people like Fred Buck (7th dan), a top Kyokushin Shihan in Arizona. I love Dukes's attitude, "In conclusion, I have little or no interest in so-called "tradition arts." If they don't work, scrap them." I am reminded that many of the issues we talk about in Bullshido are not new, not new at all.



Hanshi Raymond "Duke" Moore
10th Dan

Raymond "Duke" Moore was born in San Francisco on April 19, 1915. In his youth he loved boxing and wrestling.

In 1941, Duke became a student of Kodenkan/Danzan-Ryu Jujitsu under Ray Law at the University Ave. Dojo in Oakland, CA. Ray Law was a blackbelt under Seishiro Okazaki of Hawaii. Duke Moore excelled at Judo and Jujitsu, and learned the Kodenkan "boards" requirements for blackbelt, but was not satisfied with all aspects of the system. Thus, in 1943, he decided to go to New York City and study Judo with George Yoshida. While living in New York City, he also used all his spare time to train with Jujitsu master Kiyose Nakae. Nakae gave Moore private lessons on two tatami mats in the master's apartment.

In 1944, Raymond "Duke" Moore finally won his blackbelt in competition, and it was awarded to him by George Yoshida.

Later that year he moved back to San Francisco and opened his first school called the American Judo/Jujitsu Academy at 1819 Market Street. Later it moved to Divisidero St.

In 1946 "Duke" Moore founded the Northern California Judo Association. In 1948, he was a co-founder of the American Judo & Jujitsu Federation (AJJF) with John Cahill, Bud Estes, Dick Rickerts, and Ray Law. However, in 1950 Sensei Moore resigned from the Association because the group was insisting that all members be blackbelts of Okazaki's Kodenkan/Danzan-Ryu system. In the late 1950's and early 1960's Sensei Moore trained with Masutatsu Oyama, the founder of Kyokushin Karate, and Richard Kim, Karate and Aikijutsu master, and representative of the Dai Nippon Butokukai.

Moore received his blackbelt in Kyokushin Karate from Mas Oyama in 1957, and his 4th Dan in Shorinji Kempo Karate from Master Kim. Later, in 1965 he received his 7th Dan Blackbelt in Aikijujitsu from Master Richard Kim.
Professor Moore studied with all the great masters of the day, including Ray Law, George Yoshida, Mas Oyama, Mitz Kimura, Richard Kim, Walter Todd, Yosh Ajari, Kiyose Nakae, and Sensei Takahashi. Professor Moore was an instructor to State, Federal and Civilian employees of the California Prison System. He has also instructed hundreds of people from police departments, colleges, and all the branches of the military.

In the early 1970's the San Francisco dojo was passed to John Pereira, and Prof. Moore moved to Mountain View, CA, where he began teaching his Jujitsu style, now called ZenBudo-Ryu at Stanford University. Later this dojo was passed onto Prof. James Moses.
On October 25, 1980, the Zen Budo Society awarded Raymond V. "Duke" Moore the rank of 10th Dan. He was given a certificate which reads as follows:

Whereas he has mastered, taught and demonstrated in his life and work the philisophical truths and spiritual forces of Aiki and Budo; and in recognition of his being a Master Sensei and practitioner of over forty-five years experience in the martial art of Aiki Jujutsu, the Zen Budokai hereby awards to its founder Duke Moore the title, rank and honor of Hanshi-Judan (10th Degree).

On December 19, 1981, Duke Moore and other teachers from the Zen Budokai Organization as well as other arts, came together to form ATAMA, the American Teachers Association of the Martial Arts. This is a group meant to help those who are legitimate martial artists, but who are not associated with a master, to share knowledge, and receive credentialing as instructors in their various martial arts.

In 1999 Hanshi Moore received the Daruma Award for his lifetime committment to teaching and preserving the Martial Arts.

Hanshi Moore has written several books on the Martial Arts and Zen philosophy including: Holistic Meditation, School of the Tiger, Dharma-First of the Zen Masters, The Self-Defense Syndrome of the Human Mind, and The Fighting Spirit of Zen.

Today, Hanshi Moore has promoted over 300 blackbelts. He currently lives in Sacramento, CA, and is 87 years old. He has officially named Professor Tim Delgman as the second Soke of the ZenBudo-Ryu system upon his death.
The Senior Blackbelt leadership of ZenBudo-Ryu are: Tim Delgman (8th dan); James Moses (8th dan); Jerry Kunzman (8th dan); Ron Blankenhorn (8th dan); Fred Buck (7th dan); Art Buckley (7th dan); Harry Sherman (7th dan); Daniel Ustie (7th dan); David Wolfe (6th dan); Abbott Schlemmer (5th dan); Tim Lichtenwald (5th dan); Russ St. Hilaire (5th dan). There are approximately 20 schools worldwide teaching Hanshi Moore's ZenBudo-Ryu system.


"In conclusion, I have little or no interest in so-called "tradition arts." If they don't work, scrap them." letter to Sensei St. Hilaire from Duke Moore.

"Survival is everything...all else is trivial." from Fighting Spirit of Zen - original manuscript.

Hanshi Raymond V. "Duke" Moore passed away at approximately 4:40 pm PST on February 25, 2003 in Sacramento California.
He was a practitioner of JuJitsu for more than 60 years. He was the founder and leader of the ZenBudo-Ryu system of Self Defense and the founder of the Martial Arts Organization ATAMA.
THIS GREAT LIFE WILL BE MISSED

The lineage of Professor Moore's instructors was as follows:

Raw Law, Danzan Ryu Jujitsu
Kiyose Nakae, Jujitsu/Aiki-Ju Jitsu
George Yoshida, Judo
Mits Kimura, Judo
Masutatsu Oyama, Kyokushinkai Karate
Nishiyama, Shotokan Karate
Richard Kim, Shorinji Kempo Karate

http://www.stanford.edu/group/jujitsu/images/pictures/duke_tim_small.jpg

patfromlogan
6/26/2004 9:11am,
Another article about Duke:
Duke was born in San Francisco on April 19, 1915 . Even as a child, Duke's 1st love was boxing and wrestling. In 1932 it all began in high school. He started his boxing, he would go from gym to gym and really loved it. At this time Duke also was doing wrestling.

In 1941 Duke became a Judo/Ju jitsu student of Ray Law. His wrestling skills were of great value to him in judo competitions.

In 1943 having learned Ray Law's requirements for blackbelt degree (Yawara, shime, Oku, and Shinin ). Duke traveled to New York to study Judo randori under George Yoshida. While he was there, he studied Aiki-Ju Jitsu under the renowned Henri Nikai. After winning his judo blackbelt in competition, Duke returned to San Francisco and opened up his 1st martial arts dojo . His school ,on Divisidero St. Was the largest of it's kind in the US and attracted many blackbelt Judo and Ju Jitsu visitors .

These men and women helped further Duke's knowledge of both Judo and Ju Jitsu. Nationally famed Mitz Kimura introduced himself to Duke in 1946. He had recently been discharged from the LA detention camps where most of the people of Japanese ancestry were constrained for the duration of World War II. Kimura was immediately hired by Duke as his associate; but more important, as Duke's teacher. Over one t hird of Duke's Aiki Ju Jitsu course is comprise of Kodokan jujitsu taught to Duke by Prof. Kimura. Great teachers from all over the world were checking into Duke's school, which had now moved up to upper Market St. And became the fountain head of blackbelters graduated by duke during the next 20 years.

In 1947-8, Duke and Ray Law founded the American Judo andJu Jitsu Federation. Co-founders were Bud Estes, Johnny Cahill Sr. And Dick Rickets. In 1950 Duke Moore resigned because a motion was passed to restrict membership to blackbelt graduates of Henry Okosaka system. Duke founded a system was opened to all advocates of the martial arts and produced many judo champions like Vince Larat, Tony Trouche, Dick Blattes, Bill Godfrey, Del and Dino Esposti, Ivo Rejo and Don Buck.

In 1957 the legendary Mas Oyama was hired By Duke Moore and Don Buck one of his blackbelter to teach the Oyama's Kyokushin system of Karate.

In 1962, Duke invited Prof. Nishiyama up from L.A. to teach him and 20 of his blackbelters the shotokan system of karate. Duke , together with Richard "Biggie" Kim, Walter Todd, and Del De Esposti, formed the Northern Calfornia Karate Federation which sponsored Nishiyama Shotokan tournament which was held at S.F. Kesar Pavilion. The stadium was packed.

In 1965 Duke and Biggie Kim trained 20 of Dukes blackbelts karate and awarded them there their blackbelt degrees in Shorin-gi-ryu karate. He trained Duke privately and Duke earned his 7th dan in Aiki-Ju Jitsu, 4th dan in Judo and 4th in karate in 1966.

In 1973 Duke moved to Mt View CA . and began teaching mixed Judo, Ju Jitsu and Karate at Stanford University. 2 outstanding students graduated to become high ranking professors of the martial arts. Tim Delgman and James Moses. In 1981 Duke left Stanford to form the American Teachers Of The Martial Arts (ATAMA) which bloomed to become an international organization.

Duke Moore
From JUJUTSU Our History, by Russell St. Hilaire
Second Edition, 1993

Duke Moore began his many years of Martial Arts study in 1941 with Raymond Law at Law's American Judo & Jujutsu School in Oakland, California.

He also studied Kodenkan Jujutsu under Merlin "Bud" Estes at the Chico, CA dojo where Estes Sensei founded the American Judo And Jujutsu Federation. Moore Sensei received his Jujutsu Blackbelt in 1944 from Law Sensei. Also in 1944, Moore Sensei received his Blackbelt in Kodokan Judo from Sensei Gerogre Yoshida in New York City, NY. In 1957 he received his Blackbelt in Kyokushin Karate from Master Masutatsu Oyama (10th dan Kyokushin Karate). In 1965 Moore Sensei received the rank of 7th Dan (Shichidan, Prof.) in Aiki-Jujutsu from Master Richard Kim, representative of the Dai Nippon Butokukai of Kyoto, Japan. Master Kim also awarded Moore Sensei 4th Dan (Yodan) in both Kodokan Judo and Karate. In 1975 Duke Moore was awarded the rank of 9th Dan (Kudan, Kyoshi) in Aiki-Jujutsu by the Zen Budo Society. Sensei Moore also studied other aspects of the Martial Arts with Mits Kimura (6th Dan Judo) [Kimura was actually 7th Dan -- DFG], Walter Todd (4th Dan Karate), Takahashi Sensei (5th Dan Karate, 4th Dan Aikido), and Yosh Ajari (4th Dan Karate). Raymond Moore opened his first dojo in San Francisco, CA in 1944. The school was called the Zen Budokai and eventually established six branches throughout the San Francisco area. In 1955 he was hired by the state of California to set up self-defense training programs for all guards, officers and civilian employees of the eight California prisons. He personally developed and trained the teaching staff. During his 46 years as a teacher of Zen meditation and the martial arts he has graduated over 300 Blackbelt instructors in Jujutsu and Karate. He has taught Jujutsu to dozens of police departments, colleges, Marine, Army and Navy reserve units. Moore Sensei founded the Holistic Meditation Society in 1979 and wrote two books on Zen meditation, The Fighting Spirit of Zen and Holistic Meditation.

On 25 October 1980, The Zen Budo Society awarded Raymond V. "Duke'' Moore the rank of 10th dan. He was given a certificate which reads as follows:

Whereas he has mastered, taught and demonstrated in his life and work the philosophical truths and spiritual forces of Aiki and Budo; and in recognition of his being a Master Sensei and practitioner of over forty-five years experience in the martial art of Aiki Jujutsu, the Zen Budokai hereby awards to its founder Duke Moore the title, rank and honor of hanshi-judan (10th degree).
At the present time, Moore Sensei is chief instructor of the Stanford University Self-Defense Club with a staff of 12 Blackbelt assistants. He is counseling assistant to the chief instructor, Sensei John Pereira, the founder of the San Francisco Karate-Do School of Martial Arts.

Chief instructors under Moore Sensei are at the present: Sensei John Pereira, Sensei Leroy Rodriguez, Sensei James Moses, Sensei Jerome Kunzman, and several others.

LLL
6/26/2004 3:42pm,
Off topic crap, but

"Raw Law, Danzan Ryu Jujitsu"

...How badass do you have to be to have a name like 'Raw Law'....

blankslate
6/26/2004 11:18pm,
Amazing.

All those accomplishments and I've never heard of him.

Very humbling.

Old Fat Kenpoka
7/06/2004 5:17pm,
I had the privilege of studying with Duke Moore in the mid 1980's.

Here was this slight, elderly gentleman (79 at the time) who would walk into our Kenpo school and warm up doing breakfalls and shoulder rolls.

He was a great teacher and very personable.

Unfortunately, his Zen Budokai style uses a traditional teaching method -- training with cooperating partners with very little Randori.

The ATAMA organization he founded was a great place for Martial Arts orphans to gather, seminar, and exchange information. Unfortunately, ATAMA's rank promotion policy could enable overly generous promotions.

All in all, Duke Moore was a great person and an important contributor to American Martial Arts history.

patfromlogan
8/03/2004 11:15pm,
[i]
Unfortunately, his Zen Budokai style uses a traditional teaching method -- training with cooperating partners with very little Randori. [/B]

Yes, but he also trained Kyokushin, with plenty of hard style sparring. It is a failing of many arts, the ones I'm in now also, that they fail to combine standup and ground like mma style fighting. I'm actually trying in the two schools I'm in to do just that. Both do standup sparring and take downs and submissions and ground work.

Let's put it together!

Today in "karate" we did some single leg takedown drills, it's a start. Last nite in Kempo we did stick fighting with takedowns and submission holds/chokes and knee strikes.

Ronin
8/04/2004 7:53am,
Now, THAT is a lineage.

Miguksaram
8/04/2004 8:24am,
Excellent Article Pat. These are the type of stories we need to hear, in this day and age of belt factories and cookie cut instructors.

Ronin
8/04/2004 8:28am,
Originally posted by patfromlogan
Yes, but he also trained Kyokushin, with plenty of hard style sparring. It is a failing of many arts, the ones I'm in now also, that they fail to combine standup and ground like mma style fighting. I'm actually trying in the two schools I'm in to do just that. Both do standup sparring and take downs and submissions and ground work.

Let's put it together!

Today in "karate" we did some single leg takedown drills, it's a start. Last nite in Kempo we did stick fighting with takedowns and submission holds/chokes and knee strikes.

You know what, it really doesn't take much to ass grappling to any system.
You just need a few throws, a few locks, a few chokes, some ground work and voila.
Instructors who don't are short changing their students and are doing it for no other reason than ignorance.

jaykay100
6/23/2007 8:18am,
I am trying to find Tony Trouche (mentioned in this article). We used to hang together back in the day in San Francisco. If anyone can help me out I would really appreciate it. Last I heard he was in Hawaii.

Jim Ketchum (San Dimas, California) jaykay100@msn.com

smoresi
7/16/2007 6:44pm,
I agree that Duke Moore was a very important pioneer in American Martial Arts. Also, his system Zen Budokai is very versatile and can not easily be labeled as purely a "traditional" one. For instance, I have been training in this system for 24 years, and, for the past twelve years under his top student and now head of Zen Budokai, Professor Tim Delgman in San Francisco, CA. Professor Delgman and my main instructor Sensei Doug Haight are very open minded and supportive of my interests and training in modern Sport Jujitsu which I also teach to students in my classes. I have also met many other of Duke Moore's top students throughout the years and found all of them to be very diverse in their knowledge and background in multiple martial arts styles from the traditional to very modern. Finally, in order to move from Nidan to Sandan in Zen Budokai, one must earn a black belt in another style of Jujitsu, Judo or the equivalent skill level in a non ranking martial art.

jaykay100
8/12/2007 3:22am,
Well I found Tony Troche alive and well in Hawaii. As a matter of fact we are supposed to me August 20th in San Jose. SHould be fun....

Regards,
Jim