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resonatemoore
9/21/2017 4:05pm,
I am writing a book on mixed martial arts technique, and I'm writing a chapter on how to tell if a striking technique and/or discipline is effective or bullshit. I'm coming up with guidelines for sniffing out the BS, and was wondering if there was a clear and concise list of requirements or essential elements to effective striking techniques and disciplines for MMA.

So far, I have this...

Disciplines

1. Disciplines should include techniques that are capable of being tested in a competitive setting. If no one has ever pulled off the move in a boxing or muay thai competition, it probably won't work in MMA.

2. Disciplines should utilize techniques that are intended to damage or knock out the opponent. If the sport or discipline is based on contact or touch sparring, instead of power and impairment of the opponent, it probably won't work in MMA.

Techniques

1. Dynamic, powerful movement: The core and body weight must move dynamically. If a technique displays a lack of movement and overall body weight displacement, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

2. Efficient, fluid movement: The movement must be produced with minimal muscular activation, remaining in a position of leverage, alignment, and mechanical efficiency throughout the technique. If the technique requires too much energy to produce a movement, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

3. Control, balance, and stability: The body must remain in a position of balance and stability. If the technique makes you lose control of your body, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

4. Protective positioning: The technique must minimize exposure to the opponent. If a technique brings you out of position excessively and it leaves you vulnerable to counterstrikes, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

5. Follow-up positioning: The technique must leave you in a position to immediately follow up with another striking or control (takedowns or submissions) technique. If you're unable to move and attack the opponent at the end of the technique, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

*Technique guidelines are relative. Obviously, some techniques will be less efficient or more dangerous than others. If a technique is too dynamic, it becomes less efficient and could inhibit your efficiency or stability. If a technique is too stablizing, dynamic movement is more difficult. Balance between all five elements is best.

resonatemoore
9/21/2017 4:54pm,
Please let me know what you think. Am I missing anything? Are there exceptions to my rules? Help!

Omega Supreme
9/21/2017 7:32pm,
I am writing a book on mixed martial arts technique, and I'm writing a chapter on how to tell if a striking technique and/or discipline is effective or bullshit. I'm coming up with guidelines for sniffing out the BS, and was wondering if there was a clear and concise list of requirements or essential elements to effective striking techniques and disciplines for MMA.

So far, I have this...

Disciplines

1. Disciplines should include techniques that are capable of being tested in a competitive setting. If no one has ever pulled off the move in a boxing or muay thai competition, it probably won't work in MMA.

2. Disciplines should utilize techniques that are intended to damage or knock out the opponent. If the sport or discipline is based on contact or touch sparring, instead of power and impairment of the opponent, it probably won't work in MMA.

Techniques

1. Dynamic, powerful movement: The core and body weight must move dynamically. If a technique displays a lack of movement and overall body weight displacement, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

2. Efficient, fluid movement: The movement must be produced with minimal muscular activation, remaining in a position of leverage, alignment, and mechanical efficiency throughout the technique. If the technique requires too much energy to produce a movement, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

3. Control, balance, and stability: The body must remain in a position of balance and stability. If the technique makes you lose control of your body, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

4. Protective positioning: The technique must minimize exposure to the opponent. If a technique brings you out of position excessively and it leaves you vulnerable to counterstrikes, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

5. Follow-up positioning: The technique must leave you in a position to immediately follow up with another striking or control (takedowns or submissions) technique. If you're unable to move and attack the opponent at the end of the technique, it's probably ineffective in MMA.

*Technique guidelines are relative. Obviously, some techniques will be less efficient or more dangerous than others. If a technique is too dynamic, it becomes less efficient and could inhibit your efficiency or stability. If a technique is too stablizing, dynamic movement is more difficult. Balance between all five elements is best.

I think you're being to constrictive with your results here. Most people who do not train for a good length of time would be poor judges using your conclusions.

Nutcracker, sweet
9/21/2017 7:37pm,
Culled, because the adults showed up: http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=127177

Christmas Spirit
9/21/2017 7:47pm,
I am writing a book on mixed martial arts technique, and I'm writing a chapter on how to tell if a striking technique and/or discipline is effective or bullshit. I'm coming up with guidelines for sniffing out the BS, and was wondering if there was a clear and concise list of requirements or essential elements to effective striking techniques and disciplines for MMA.

So far, I have this...

Disciplines

1. Disciplines should include techniques that are capable of being tested in a competitive setting. If no one has ever pulled off the move in a boxing or muay thai competition, it probably won't work in MMA.
The following all work in the ring and have video examples readily available on Youtube:
360 backfists
Tornado Kicks
Flying Elbows
Arm Punching
Keeping your hands down
Breakdancing
Wild Haymakers
... and that is just off the top of my head.

2. Disciplines should utilize techniques that are intended to damage or knock out the opponent. If the sport or discipline is based on contact or touch sparring, instead of power and impairment of the opponent, it probably won't work in MMA.
I am sure this is flawed too somehow...

Techniques
blah blah blah

Aliveness. Matt Thornton + Aliveness.

hungryjoe
9/21/2017 7:55pm,
I think you're being to constrictive with your results here. Most people who do not train for a good length of time would be poor judges using your conclusions.

Perhaps the OP is coming at this from the wrong direction and should point out areas (techniques, training methodologies, mindsets for lack of a better word, etc) that are indications of bs.

Omega Supreme
9/21/2017 8:23pm,
Perhaps the OP is coming at this from the wrong direction and should point out areas (techniques, training methodologies, mindsets for lack of a better word, etc) that are indications of bs.

That's an idea.

ermghoti
9/21/2017 9:10pm,
Maybe he could start a website dedicated to such.

Permalost
9/21/2017 9:42pm,
I had this idea for a rolling device to attach to an axle. You start with a flat square of material, then cut the corners off to make an octagon, then cut those corners off to make it more round, then keep cutting the corners off until it has a nice round shape. I call it the rollinator.

ermghoti
9/21/2017 9:54pm,
I had this idea for a rolling device to attach to an axle. You start with a flat square of material, then cut the corners off to make an octagon, then cut those corners off to make it more round, then keep cutting the corners off until it has a nice round shape. I call it the rollinator.

Lightbulbs hate him! Create light and heat with friction using this weird trick!

GrouchyOldMan
9/21/2017 10:02pm,
I had this idea for a rolling device to attach to an axle. You start with a flat square of material, then cut the corners off to make an octagon, then cut those corners off to make it more round, then keep cutting the corners off until it has a nice round shape. I call it the rollinator.

This would never work on the street.

Permalost
9/21/2017 11:36pm,
This would never work on the street.

Well instead of a street, we'll design a flattened road covered in some sort of hard concrete type material for the rollinators to roll on.

BKR
9/22/2017 12:34am,
Sorry to be a little more serious when this occurred to me driving back from Judo tonight is there any sort of even semi standardized syllabus or pedagogic method for teaching MMA to a beginner who has no previous martial arts experience.

resonatemoore
9/22/2017 5:02pm,
Why would you say that those moves work well in MMA, but are never used successfully in boxing or thai?

BKR
9/22/2017 5:09pm,
Why would you say that those moves work well in MMA, but are never used successfully in boxing or thai?

Different rule-sets? What is allowed in boxing versus MT versus MMA? Isn't a true backfist against rules in standard boxing?

Rulesets of combat sport drive techniques, tactics, and strategy.

Michael Tzadok
9/23/2017 9:13pm,
Why would you say that those moves work well in MMA, but are never used successfully in boxing or thai?

Having to worry about take downs, leg attacks and submissions significantly changes the game. Also different rules as to what is permitted, tends to change things up.