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View Full Version : A goju ryu practitioner wanting to know: aikido style techniques in shotokan?



kimjonghng
9/04/2017 10:12am,
Ok so I stumbled on this passage on http://moichido.co.uk/about-shokotan/

'Techniques in kihon and kata are characterized by deep, long stances that provide stability, enable powerful movements, and strengthen the legs. Shotokan is often regarded as a ‘hard’ and ‘external’ martial art because it is taught that way to beginners and coloured belts to develop strong basic techniques and stances. Initially strength and power are demonstrated instead of slower, more flowing motions. Those who progress to brown and black belt level develop a much more fluid style which incorporates grappling and some aikido-like techniques, which can be found in the black belt katas. Kumite techniques mirror these stances and movements at a basic level, but are less structured, with a focus instead on speed and efficiency.'

So anyway Ive been looking at some videos and most of it looks more jujitsu/judo than Aikido. Any examples of specific techniques?

daishi
11/12/2017 9:58pm,
Ok so I stumbled on this passage on http://moichido.co.uk/about-shokotan/

'Techniques in kihon and kata are characterized by deep, long stances that provide stability, enable powerful movements, and strengthen the legs. Shotokan is often regarded as a ‘hard’ and ‘external’ martial art because it is taught that way to beginners and coloured belts to develop strong basic techniques and stances. Initially strength and power are demonstrated instead of slower, more flowing motions. Those who progress to brown and black belt level develop a much more fluid style which incorporates grappling and some aikido-like techniques, which can be found in the black belt katas. Kumite techniques mirror these stances and movements at a basic level, but are less structured, with a focus instead on speed and efficiency.'

So anyway Ive been looking at some videos and most of it looks more jujitsu/judo than Aikido. Any examples of specific techniques?

Jujinage is a pretty natural bunki for mawashi uke type movements.

Some karate styles have a
Nikkyo/nikkajo type of wrist lock.

Armbars and stuff.

Techniques in aikido aren’t necessarily that unique. The style and application of training sets it apart, though even within Aikido the style of training varies.

I? originally started aikido to help with my bunkai for GoJu kata.


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BJMills
1/14/2018 3:22pm,
I did shotokan as a kid. I remember learning some standing arm locks and wrist locks in some of the bunkai... I don’t even remember the names of any of the katas anymore so I can’t say which.

On a scale of usefulness it’s exactly like aikido. Not worth really spending any time on.

Yoshinkai
3/28/2018 2:35am,
I? originally started aikido to help with my bunkai for GoJu kata.

Im curious to hear your thoughts on this. I am doing the exact opposite. While looking for my knee to heal up and strengthen I have started Goju. Do you find the two compatible?

Cheers
Mike

kimjonghng
4/05/2018 2:35pm,
I? originally started aikido to help with my bunkai for GoJu kata.

Im curious to hear your thoughts on this. I am doing the exact opposite. While looking for my knee to heal up and strengthen I have started Goju. Do you find the two compatible?

Cheers
Mike

I definitely think Aikido and Goju can be compatible from my main art being Goju and having done some Aikido. Thing is Aikido is basically a supplementary art and should never be trained on its own for a serious fighter assuming you think you can work it in. By all means it can be fun, sociable and a decent way to stay in martial arts if you are interested but wrist locks like that are low percentage and only really will work for someone with a strong grappling base. I imagine a Judoka, BJJ-er or Samboist could put them to great use in combination with their throws and locks but that's like knowing how to skid your car well without knowing how to do anything else behind a wheel.

Go for it and have fun, but definitely consider other things as well.

ksennin
5/15/2018 12:47pm,
Shotokan karate is said to be mostly derived from shuri-te, the lineage emphasizing strong linear motions and direct attacks. The more circular motions associated with arts like aikido and jujitsu are more in the naha-te lineage. You can see some of it in some of the more advanced kata and in the personal teachings of people like the late Asai, but that was more like the exceptions that prove the rule.