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remington50
8/07/2017 7:28am,
I had my first tournament and I performed...not so well. I found the first thing I need to work on though. And so here I am asking. What are some high reward, low risk ways of getting a fellow heavyweight off their feet? Any recommendations? I am looking for ways to improve my game there.

Ps

Blue belt with no wrestling experience. BJJ/Judo training. So any moves are welcome.

Ulsteryank
8/07/2017 7:55am,
If you say you've Judo experience, I can't think of much to say in that area...

I like wrestling style take downs though. I have a lot of success with double legs, and switch to singles, then a sacrifice if it doesn't work. I walk at heavy, and compete at superheavy, so you can definitely get a fellow heavy off of their feet with them. If you've no wrestling experience though, it's something you'll have to drill a lot, and learn to deal with sprawls and such before attempting them in competitions. Sounds like you got something out of it though which is good.

That's just me though, if you've Judo experience perhaps one of the Judokas might have something to offer that'll suit your game better.

remington50
8/07/2017 8:19am,
If you say you've Judo experience, I can't think of much to say in that area...

I like wrestling style take downs though. I have a lot of success with double legs, and switch to singles, then a sacrifice if it doesn't work. I walk at heavy, and compete at superheavy, so you can definitely get a fellow heavy off of their feet with them. If you've no wrestling experience though, it's something you'll have to drill a lot, and learn to deal with sprawls and such before attempting them in competitions. Sounds like you got something out of it though which is good.

That's just me though, if you've Judo experience perhaps one of the Judokas might have something to offer that'll suit your game better.

Yea. My judo is not standard Judo as we go by Brazilian Jiu jitsu rules. So wrestling is and grabbing legs is allowed. I guess technically I'm super heavy. They were just referring to us as heavyweights at tournament (hard to get guys into that bracket I guess).

I definitely like single and double legs. I just don't do them often. I think people tend to defend them well...or rather...I just do them wrong and slow.


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AcerTempest
8/07/2017 9:31am,
I am a big fan of Ko-uchi gari in to either Harai Goshi or Uchi-Mata, whichever you are comfortable with. Unless they are taller than me, then it is Tai-Otoshi or Drop-knee Seoi Nage/Seoi-otoshi. Those are my go-to weapons. I have also used a drop-behind O-soto gari that works pretty well. I walk around at heavy-weight BTW. Although I did compete at middleweight for a while and will be getting back to it.

remington50
8/07/2017 9:41am,
I am a big fan of Ko-uchi gari in to either Harai Goshi or Uchi-Mata, whichever you are comfortable with. Unless they are taller than me, then it is Tai-Otoshi or Drop-knee Seoi Nage/Seoi-otoshi. Those are my go-to weapons. I have also used a drop-behind O-soto gari that works pretty well. I walk around at heavy-weight BTW. Although I did compete at middleweight for a while and will be getting back to it.

Nice. Thanks man. I definitely have done those. So I can work them into my game. I noticed that I really wasn't that much shorter than anyone in my division. But I was heavier. So it should work


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Raycetpfl
8/07/2017 10:03am,
http://youtu.be/s5k4Kh8ErS8

Imho Collar drags > shots in the gi.

Raycetpfl
8/07/2017 10:08am,
http://youtu.be/n05PdHl2PJM

Raycetpfl
8/07/2017 10:23am,
I am a taller HW so I do a lot of upper body clinching. I like to tie up and grip fight. I do a lot of sacrifice throws, head and arm throws, trips, Russian Tie , Georgian Grip and

Raycetpfl
8/07/2017 10:37am,
Then there is Vieria.....

They call it drop Seio Nage but it's more of a uke otoshi with a same side morote grip.

I like the throws where I use my own body weight falling to make the throw.

I use everything he does here.


http://youtu.be/v8pi6j9Txg4

AcerTempest
8/07/2017 11:10am,
Also, I HIGHLY recommend listening to Rayce. He is a very experienced competitor with a good knowledge of both Judo and BJJ as arts. He won't steer you wrong with this stuff.

That being said, some other things to think about.
Whatever take-down you do, you will need to learn what off balance FEELS like. That, IMO, is the number one reason beginners do not get many clean take-downs.
The number 2 reason, is NOT ENOUGH REPS. Seriously, whatever you are doing, do NOT just get shown something once, do it a few times and then start trying to force it through in randori or competition.
Please, for the love of Christ, DO SOME REPS. Cooperative training is FAR more effective at building specific skills than competitive training.

BKR
8/07/2017 11:16am,
http://youtu.be/s5k4Kh8ErS8

Imho Collar drags > shots in the gi.

This sort of thing can be very effective. You can use the gi to set up the angles and action reaction to get the penetration. It's a lot easier than doing normal Judo throws.

The brown belt I try to train (BJJ) with is very effective (in gi) at setting this stuff up. In the three matches I watched (on video) from the tournament this weekend, that's what he did.

BKR
8/07/2017 11:26am,
I had my first tournament and I performed...not so well. I found the first thing I need to work on though. And so here I am asking. What are some high reward, low risk ways of getting a fellow heavyweight off their feet? Any recommendations? I am looking for ways to improve my game there.

Ps

Blue belt with no wrestling experience. BJJ/Judo training. So any moves are welcome.

Whatever you do you are going to have to either add training time for take-downs and transitions (which are VERY important), or take time from ground training to drill them.

remington50
8/07/2017 11:34am,
Also, I HIGHLY recommend listening to Rayce. He is a very experienced competitor with a good knowledge of both Judo and BJJ as arts. He won't steer you wrong with this stuff.

That being said, some other things to think about.
Whatever take-down you do, you will need to learn what off balance FEELS like. That, IMO, is the number one reason beginners do not get many clean take-downs.
The number 2 reason, is NOT ENOUGH REPS. Seriously, whatever you are doing, do NOT just get shown something once, do it a few times and then start trying to force it through in randori or competition.
Please, for the love of Christ, DO SOME REPS. Cooperative training is FAR more effective at building specific skills than competitive training.

Absolutely. I'm a firm believer. My friend and I went to a completion and he actually took gold in both divisions. His presence on his feet was vastly superior to his opponents. Mainly because of his Kung fu knowledge. That balance was always there.

Thanks for the advice.


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remington50
8/07/2017 11:35am,
Then there is Vieria.....

They call it drop Seio Nage but it's more of a uke otoshi with a same side morote grip.

I like the throws where I use my own body weight falling to make the throw.

I use everything he does here.

[/video]

Thanks man. I got some new videos for my playlist :)

I will be working on these as soon as I am in class.


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Raycetpfl
8/07/2017 11:50am,
Whatever you do you are going to have to either add training time for take-downs and transitions (which are VERY important), or take time from ground training to drill them.

Indeed.
This is a magnificently vast field of study. Take downs are hard and not rewarded very well in bjj.
If you want to Win bjj matches I wouldn't even say that they are absolutely needed. If you have a sick guard and a good guard pull you can be a world champ.
If you want to be a complete martial artist and train for mma,self-defense and just for self satisfaction than I think it is a great endeavor to take on.

WFMurphyPhD
8/07/2017 12:28pm,
Yamashita is an excellent heavy weight Judoka, and he has written some good books, and produced some free clinics that are available on the Tube.
Also, there are many excellent wrestling resources specifically for heavy weight wrestlers distributed by Championship Videos,
also, Bob Anderson's series may be of interest to you.
I would also add that hand fighting benefits Judoka and Wrestlers alike, and applies to all weight class situations.