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jackwinsemall
6/21/2017 2:31pm,
Sup bros,

name's Jack, and i'm new to the forum. i've loved MMA-style grappling for years now, and i mainly wrestle with buddies just for fun nowadays. i can't say i win them all like my name says, but i think i can do better.

that said, what are some good back exercises to really build back strength? i find my back to be the weaker part of my body, and that's hurt me before during ground-work.

thanks guys

AcerTempest
6/21/2017 3:02pm,
Rows...ALL the rows. Lots of time on a rowing machine is good for grappling and, with proper form, works the muscles of the upper back and shoulders that are a big part of grappling.

Once you are done doing rows... do some more.
Then, for lower back and core work, medicine balls, lots of medicine balls. Balancing on it, using it on russian twists, doing other exercises with it as a platform...etc.

jackwinsemall
6/21/2017 3:07pm,
thanks man,

as of right now, i only got bent-over row and seated-row as my rowing in my routine. so you're saying i should go to the rowing machine?

lower back is tougher to "feel." i have enough trouble with feeling my muscles with the lat-pulldown, and thats not even lower back. Do you have any other lower-back exercises that dont involve medicine balls? my hips are hurting after tussling with friends....and sometimes my girl lol. I'm doing weighted back-extensions. it's not killling my hips too too badly

Phrost
6/21/2017 3:13pm,
Sup bros,

name's Jack, and i'm new to the forum. i've loved MMA-style grappling for years now, and i mainly wrestle with buddies just for fun nowadays. i can't say i win them all like my name says, but i think i can do better.

that said, what are some good back exercises to really build back strength? i find my back to be the weaker part of my body, and that's hurt me before during ground-work.

thanks guys

1. Deadlifts.

http://i.imgur.com/RxPzjgf.gif

2. Pendlay Rows.

https://cdn.stronglifts.com/wp-content/uploads/barbell-row.jpg

3. Deadlifts.

http://i.imgur.com/ISLiRV7.gif

4. Deadlifts.

https://68.media.tumblr.com/a812c4e5799d0486ade73c928832d9ca/tumblr_oc9mvwtWTZ1sqw7fko2_400.gif

WFMurphyPhD
6/21/2017 3:15pm,
Rows...ALL the rows. Lots of time on a rowing machine is good for grappling and, with proper form, works the muscles of the upper back and shoulders that are a big part of grappling.

Once you are done doing rows... do some more.
Then, for lower back and core work, medicine balls, lots of medicine balls. Balancing on it, using it on russian twists, doing other exercises with it as a platform...etc.

I suspect the rowing machine and some body weight core exercises are particularly good things for grapplers in their mid-thirties and up to consider, more so with every passing year they have in that age bracket.

jackwinsemall
6/21/2017 3:20pm,
....sooooo youre saying i should maybe try deadlifts???

LOL thanks bro!

Holy Moment
6/21/2017 7:02pm,
Bicep curls.

Shawarma
6/22/2017 5:45am,
First of all, you should not ask these questions on the internet, particularly if you have low back pain. A lot of the brotastic advice you're going to get is only going to make that worse.

Instead, I'd recommend you consult a personal trainer (if strength is your goal) or physiotherapist (if reduction of back discomfort through training is your goal.) Exercise routines need to be fitted to your current physique and needs and you can't really do that over the internet.

BackFistMonkey
6/22/2017 6:08am,
First of all, you should not ask these questions on the internet, particularly if you have low back pain. A lot of the brotastic advice you're going to get is only going to make that worse.

Instead, I'd recommend you consult a personal trainer (if strength is your goal) or physiotherapist (if reduction of back discomfort through training is your goal.) Exercise routines need to be fitted to your current physique and needs and you can't really do that over the internet.

I know ya'll can't see this but I have been reading this thread and laughing.
Shawarma is correct. If not a physical therapist then a doctor. Preferably in the neurology or orthopedics viarities.

Phrost
6/22/2017 10:14am,
All I read was that he had a weak back.

The cure for a weak back is deadlifts, which he should have started a week back.

1point2
6/22/2017 10:35am,
First of all, you should not ask these questions on the internet, particularly if you have low back pain. A lot of the brotastic advice you're going to get is only going to make that worse.

Instead, I'd recommend you consult a personal trainer (if strength is your goal) or physiotherapist (if reduction of back discomfort through training is your goal.) Exercise routines need to be fitted to your current physique and needs and you can't really do that over the internet.

This is stupid and ridiculous. The vast, overwhelming majority of people lacking back strength don't need to see a doctor. They don't need a physiotherapist. They certainly don't need to consult a goddamn neurologist. Are y'all being serious? They need to do back extensions until they can deadlift and then they need to deadlift and then they need to deadlift heavier.

Jesús Christos. "See a doctor before lifting a barbell." It's a 50/50 shot that a randomly chosen doctor will—literally, I'm not exaggerating—order him to stop wrestling, stop playing sports, and to restrict himself to treadmills and isolation bodybuilding cable machines at GloboGym for the rest of his life. Maybe just climb in a wheelchair and start a painkiller regimen while we're at it.

If you're a reasonably average-sized adult male already wrestling and working back extensions, then read up on deadlifts, watch some deadlift instructionals on YouTube by large strong people, and get to the gym. Start with one big plate on either side of the full-size barbell. Film your deadlift sets and post the video for a form check on a forum for crossfit, powerlifting, starting strength, or Oly lifting. Take a day off then go back to the gym, repeating the earlier steps with five or ten pounds more than the previous time until your deadlift is double bodyweight for reps with a flat back.

Romanian deadlifts could be acceptable. Rows, whether barbell or dumbbell, are acceptable accessories. Pull-ups and squats alongside the pulls aren't a bad idea. But deadlifts are what need to be happening. Don't overcomplicate this with a trip to an orthopedist. ("What are you here for?" "My back isn't strong enough when I wrestle so I think I should lift weights." "Uh...OK? Leave your $40 copay with the receptionist.")

1point2
6/22/2017 10:40am,
Good form check video guidelines: http://startingstrength.com/resources/forum/technique/20249-posting-technique-forum.html

This is a fine video to watch before you deadlift the first time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGZrATR1O4E

BackFistMonkey
6/22/2017 10:44am,
All I read was that he had a weak back.

The cure for a weak back is deadlifts, which he should have started a week back.

Wait wut...

*Rereads OP*

Ignore my above post and go with this below. I misread OP, had that in my head, saw Shawarma post, which reinforced my mistake and went with it.

I am stupid and I am sure there was some projection in there too.


This is stupid and ridiculous. The vast, overwhelming majority of people lacking back strength don't need to see a doctor. They don't need a physiotherapist. They certainly don't need to consult a goddamn neurologist. Are y'all being serious? They need to do back extensions until they can deadlift and then they need to deadlift and then they need to deadlift heavier.

Jesús Christos. "See a doctor before lifting a barbell." It's a 50/50 shot that a randomly chosen doctor will—literally, I'm not exaggerating—order him to stop wrestling, stop playing sports, and to restrict himself to treadmills and isolation bodybuilding cable machines at GloboGym for the rest of his life. Maybe just climb in a wheelchair and start a painkiller regimen while we're at it.

If you're a reasonably average-sized adult male already wrestling and working back extensions, then read up on deadlifts, watch some deadlift instructionals on YouTube by large strong people, and get to the gym. Start with one big plate on either side of the full-size barbell. Film your deadlift sets and post the video for a form check on a forum for crossfit, powerlifting, starting strength, or Oly lifting. Take a day off then go back to the gym, repeating the earlier steps with five or ten pounds more than the previous time until your deadlift is double bodyweight for reps with a flat back.

Romanian deadlifts could be acceptable. Rows, whether barbell or dumbbell, are acceptable accessories. Pull-ups and squats alongside the pulls aren't a bad idea. But deadlifts are what need to be happening. Don't overcomplicate this with a trip to an orthopedist. ("What are you here for?" "My back isn't strong enough when I wrestle so I think I should lift weights." "Uh...OK? Leave your $40 copay with the receptionist.")

Shawarma
6/22/2017 11:35am,
This is stupid and ridiculous. The vast, overwhelming majority of people lacking back strength don't need to see a doctor. They don't need a physiotherapist. They certainly don't need to consult a goddamn neurologist. Are y'all being serious? They need to do back extensions until they can deadlift and then they need to deadlift and then they need to deadlift heavier.

Jesús Christos. "See a doctor before lifting a barbell." It's a 50/50 shot that a randomly chosen doctor will—literally, I'm not exaggerating—order him to stop wrestling, stop playing sports, and to restrict himself to treadmills and isolation bodybuilding cable machines at GloboGym for the rest of his life. Maybe just climb in a wheelchair and start a painkiller regimen while we're at it.

If you're a reasonably average-sized adult male already wrestling and working back extensions, then read up on deadlifts, watch some deadlift instructionals on YouTube by large strong people, and get to the gym. Start with one big plate on either side of the full-size barbell. Film your deadlift sets and post the video for a form check on a forum for crossfit, powerlifting, starting strength, or Oly lifting. Take a day off then go back to the gym, repeating the earlier steps with five or ten pounds more than the previous time until your deadlift is double bodyweight for reps with a flat back.

Romanian deadlifts could be acceptable. Rows, whether barbell or dumbbell, are acceptable accessories. Pull-ups and squats alongside the pulls aren't a bad idea. But deadlifts are what need to be happening. Don't overcomplicate this with a trip to an orthopedist. ("What are you here for?" "My back isn't strong enough when I wrestle so I think I should lift weights." "Uh...OK? Leave your $40 copay with the receptionist.")

Quite brotacular advice, old fellow. His phrasing was "this has hurt me during groundwork" and "my hips are hurting." It is not clear whether this is actual back discomfort or merely a feeling of weakness. If the former then no, you do not need to do back extensions and then deadlifts as adviced by internet broskis, and if the latter, you actually need somebody in real life to show you how to deadlift and squat PROPERLY.

YouTube for deadlift form? Nigga, please. The only thing you can learn from Youtube is how to aquire disc herniations more efficiently. If new to working with weights, it is of immense value to get somebody to teach you how to do it properly, especially if doing so is their day job. You will avoid making newbie mistakes that might harm you ages from now, when you can't use youthful strength to compensate for poor form.

I do agree though that a doctor is worthless for this, orthopaedic specialist or not. Rehab and training is not really their game. Physio if pain is the issue, fitness trainer if strength is the problem.

jackwinsemall
6/22/2017 1:20pm,
First of all, you should not ask these questions on the internet, particularly if you have low back pain. A lot of the brotastic advice you're going to get is only going to make that worse.

Instead, I'd recommend you consult a personal trainer (if strength is your goal) or physiotherapist (if reduction of back discomfort through training is your goal.) Exercise routines need to be fitted to your current physique and needs and you can't really do that over the internet.

i see...sorry to cause any trouble man. i'll take your advice and go to a PT in the gym.

just trying to get better and bulkier for my girl, ya know?

ChenPengFi
6/22/2017 1:40pm,
Don't confuse PT (Physical Therapist) with PT (Personal Trainer).
Lots of the latter are full of **** and like to play doctor, which they have no business doing.
"Corrective exercise" dickheads fall under this umbrella.

Granted there are many full of **** people in every profession, but Physical Therapists are healthcare professionals, not seminar graduates like so many trainers.
A Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) is generally who you're looking for in the gym for good advice, not just a personal trainer.
Athletic Trainers are also pretty well educated, and that's an actual protected title like "Physical Therapist", and unlike "Personal Trainer".

(These are US titles.)