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CraigShaw
6/14/2017 3:12am,
Almost every time I spar or train, someone will ask me if I used to do karate and say that I have a karate stance. I was wondering if some of you out there could give some feedback on this?

When fighting, I tend to present one side more forward then the other (occasionally with my forward side turn slightly in to present less of a target).

In boxing no one has really pointed it out, only when doing Muay Thai - and even then no one has pointed anything bad out about it. The most explanation I had was that by not standing in a "face-on" and square, I'm not open to strike as quickly with short blows like knees and elbows.

BackFistMonkey
6/14/2017 4:32am,
Almost every time I spar or train, someone will ask me if I used to do karate and say that I have a karate stance. I was wondering if some of you out there could give some feedback on this?

When fighting, I tend to present one side more forward then the other (occasionally with my forward side turn slightly in to present less of a target).

In boxing no one has really pointed it out, only when doing Muay Thai - and even then no one has pointed anything bad out about it. The most explanation I had was that by not standing in a "face-on" and square, I'm not open to strike as quickly with short blows like knees and elbows.

Your coaches should have explained this to you. Side-on stances limit your options and restrict your ability to generate power using proper boxing/kickboxing mechanics.

I really have a hard time believing your boxing coach hasn't mentioned it because you just can't box side-on.

CraigShaw
6/14/2017 5:57am,
Your coaches should have explained this to you. Side-on stances limit your options and restrict your ability to generate power using proper boxing/kickboxing mechanics.

I really have a hard time believing your boxing coach hasn't mentioned it because you just can't box side-on.

I think I explained wrong. I don't stand side on, but I don't stand square either. (I tried finding an image of how I stand and uploaded the closest I could find. My feet are pretty much in the position shown with my torso facing front with hands up at chin height with my left hand slightly in front of my left.)

The only input I got from my boxing instructor was that he told me to widen my stance to be able to get more rotation into my hips.

MisterMR
6/14/2017 7:21am,
I think that the boxe stance is less frontal than the MT stance, so a stance that looks "too sideways" to a MTer might look not so extreme to a boxer.

That's because in boxe nobody is trying to kick your legs, so if you want to play defensive boxe you can stay a bit more sideways and keep some more centimeters between your face and your opponent's gloves.

PS:

My understanding (based on very few boxing lessions plus stuff I read on the internet) is that boxers that like to stay close to the opponent and exchange lots of short punches (hooks etc.) and dodge the opponent (infighters) tend to keep a more frontal stance with both feet more or less pointed towards the opponent, whereas boxers who like to stay far from the opponent and like to counterpunch him when he attaks (outfighters) tend to keep a more sideways stance with the back foot at a 45 angle, though not as sideways as a karate guy.

Corzer
7/01/2017 5:33am,
My consensus was always that a so called "Side-On" stance allows great lateral movement, but can leave the back of the leg exposed to kicks. But really it's all up to what works for you, if something works, stick with it. People can generate power with all kinds of stances.

Permalost
7/01/2017 9:28pm,
"Did you used to do karate?" is not always meant in a complimentary way, but is usually taken as such.

Guird
7/03/2017 12:10pm,
I've heard it described as a 'bladed' stance, and even in MT and kickboxing there are fighters who find success with it (though that's the exception, not the rule). If you're planning on sticking with it, I'd suggest getting really good at using the teep and side-teep to stuff your opponent's kicking attempts, as it's difficult to check low kicks to the outside of your leg, and they're all the more devastating if they do land.

I'll echo what corzer said, I have also heard about the bladed stance being most common in boxing (as well as american (no low-kick) kickboxing), though I realize that boxing styles can be extremely varied.

RynoGreene
7/11/2017 2:50pm,
Sorry, I'm a little late to this one. With a sideways stance, your hips are turned, limiting attacks from one side. If you're righty, this would be your left hand. You simply won't be able to turn your hips much more and get any power into your hooks or power jabs. To get power on a hook, your hips must turn aggressively, but since you're already turned already turned almost to the limit, you are restricted in this motion.

Depending on how much you are turned sideways, you may be limiting your crosses and overhands as well. If your hips can't turn into them, you won't get power.

For power generation of a cross or overhand, think of the position you would be in to push a stalled car up a slight incline. You would not be able to stand sideways and get enough leverage to push that thing forward. You would have to square up, sink your weight, and get a stable structure to push it up the hill. This is fairly similar to what your position should be like when landing an overhand or a cross with power. Your stance should set you up to do this easily with minimal footwork shuffling.

soniccor
8/08/2017 8:31am,
I dont want fighting games to ever become popular on PC because getting the best possible PC is too expensive and getting a not so great PC puts you at a disadvantage

Myn
8/10/2017 8:54pm,
I think I explained wrong. I don't stand side on, but I don't stand square either. (I tried finding an image of how I stand and uploaded the closest I could find. My feet are pretty much in the position shown with my torso facing front with hands up at chin height with my left hand slightly in front of my left.)

The only input I got from my boxing instructor was that he told me to widen my stance to be able to get more rotation into my hips.

I'm not sure how you would effectively practice MT from such a stance - to me it would seem inappropriate for the style in general because it gives you fewer tools to strike with, fewer ways to defend, and fewer methods to generate effective force through proper rotation. Where did you learn to practice MT from this stance, if I might ask?

V/R

Myn

Retribution
8/11/2017 6:54am,
Karate stances tend to be more rigid and weight will be almost always on one leg or the other depending on style. They are usually pretty obvious. Also the way you move can be a give away as well. Have you indeed done Karate, or is it just your present style?