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Raycetpfl
6/09/2017 1:25pm,
http://youtu.be/GAn8hY3hm8A

I was looking for some ideas four combinations off of this style of uchi mata. A good set up and follow up throw is kinda what I was thinking.

Omega Supreme
6/09/2017 1:46pm,
http://youtu.be/GAn8hY3hm8A

I was looking for some ideas four combinations off of this style of uchi mata. A good set up and follow up throw is kinda what I was thinking.

Lots of fun stuff off that entry. Are you comfortable with seo otoshi?

AcerTempest
6/09/2017 2:00pm,
Ko-uchi gari makes a really good set-up for this. Follow up is going to depend on how much kuzushi you can get and how they are countering/stopping you. The most common uchi-mata counter is to clamp the legs together and/or hip block. This sets up a pretty good drop-knee seoi-nage/seoi-otoshi, but also can lead to a switch tani-otoshi if you can get your opponent to over commit to the counter.

BKR
6/09/2017 2:19pm,
http://youtu.be/GAn8hY3hm8A

I was looking for some ideas four combinations off of this style of uchi mata. A good set up and follow up throw is kinda what I was thinking.



couple of things..
1.) That is a demo of opposite side gripping. Are you having problems with left-sided guys?
2.) Those are all standard opposite grip uchi mata entries and simple gripping tactics, LOL at "Korean Uchi MAta.


Set-Up, assuming you are a righty
1.) You need to get inside lapel position and either sleeve control or double lapel as illustrated in the video. That gets complicated to explain in words. Once key is when you get the double lapel, you need to pull down with it to help break their posture. Otherwise, you are vulnerable.
2.) Set-up options range from simple (circle towards your lapel hand) to more complicated.
3.) In general, you would attack the lead leg with movement and ashi waza first. The lead leg is equivalent to a frame as term is used in ground-fighting, so you have to get it out of the way, move around it, etc.
4.) The ashiwaza could be Ouchi Gari, De Ashi Barai, Kosoto Gari/Gake, or sticky-foot variations of those, or you can use your back leg to the inside of their lead leg (you see that more in the various types of chinese throwing arts).
5.) Kouchi Gari can work as well, as they showed, but requires a bigger movement on your part in front of them, with more risk to you as tori.
6.) Followup throws depend on uke reaction and how well you do the initial entry sequence, and the evolving configuration.
7.) Followup throws: Kouchi Gari (to far leg), Ouchi Gari (near leg), different forward throws (Seoi Otoshi as mentioned by Omega is one), Tai Otoshi, Sumi Gaeshi, are the common ones.

You also have options if you get the outside lapel grip.

Time for lunch, hope that helps.

Raycetpfl
6/09/2017 2:38pm,
Lots of fun stuff off that entry. Are you comfortable with seo otoshi?

Yes it's one of my favorite things. Anything where I drop I do ok. A true japanese style drop seoi I don't do as well with but I can hit it.

Raycetpfl
6/09/2017 2:44pm,
couple of things..
1.) That is a demo of opposite side gripping. Are you having problems with left-sided guys?
2.) Those are all standard opposite grip uchi mata entries and simple gripping tactics, LOL at "Korean Uchi MAta.


Set-Up, assuming you are a righty
1.) You need to get inside lapel position and either sleeve control or double lapel as illustrated in the video. That gets complicated to explain in words. Once key is when you get the double lapel, you need to pull down with it to help break their posture. Otherwise, you are vulnerable.
2.) Set-up options range from simple (circle towards your lapel hand) to more complicated.
3.) In general, you would attack the lead leg with movement and ashi waza first. The lead leg is equivalent to a frame as term is used in ground-fighting, so you have to get it out of the way, move around it, etc.
4.) The ashiwaza could be Ouchi Gari, De Ashi Barai, Kosoto Gari/Gake, or sticky-foot variations of those, or you can use your back leg to the inside of their lead leg (you see that more in the various types of chinese throwing arts).
5.) Kouchi Gari can work as well, as they showed, but requires a bigger movement on your part in front of them, with more risk to you as tori.
6.) Followup throws depend on uke reaction and how well you do the initial entry sequence, and the evolving configuration.
7.) Followup throws: Kouchi Gari (to far leg), Ouchi Gari (near leg), different forward throws (Seoi Otoshi as mentioned by Omega is one), Tai Otoshi, Sumi Gaeshi, are the common ones.

You also have options if you get the outside lapel grip.

Time for lunch, hope that helps.

Very nice. Thanks Ben!

BKR
6/09/2017 4:29pm,
Yes it's one of my favorite things. Anything where I drop I do ok. A true japanese style drop seoi I don't do as well with but I can hit it.

Going to both knees from Uchi Mata.... I've seen it done, but it would be easier to to Tai Otoshi or some sort of leg-across Seoi Nage/Otoshi.

If the guy is really tough, you can hit their near leg with Ouchi Gari and lift it, then step across to Tai Otoshi or Harai Goshi.

There are quite a few possibilities.

BKR
6/09/2017 4:34pm,
To clarify, on the double lapel grip, you need to pull down with your left grip on his right lapel to pull his head down a bit.

SOP versus lefties is to get inside lapel with your right hand, far lapel with left, and pull down. They will often go for your left hand, at which point you drop the lapel hand, grip their sleeve, and establish sleeve control in your half of the space.

Of course, getting inside lapel versus a skilled gripper can be loads of fun. In which case you get outside lapel, over back, etc. and work from there.

At more advanced level, you combine ashi waza, movement, and gripping in different orders and in different combinations to penetrate their grip defense, establish the grip you want, and throw.

Raycetpfl
6/09/2017 4:45pm,
Going to both knees from Uchi Mata.... I've seen it done, but it would be easier to to Tai Otoshi or some sort of leg-across Seoi Nage/Otoshi.

If the guy is really tough, you can hit their near leg with Ouchi Gari and lift it, then step across to Tai Otoshi or Harai Goshi.

There are quite a few possibilities.

Forward throw to Ouchi Gari is kinda my go to. So I will kuzushi in and if they pull back or hip check I will Ouchi Gari. I do the drop version of it. If they are still standing at that point I generally switch to "wrestle-jitsu" and I will spam single legs and half guard pulls to single legs and sweeps.

Raycetpfl
6/09/2017 4:49pm,
To clarify, on the double lapel grip, you need to pull down with your left grip on his right lapel to pull his head down a bit.

SOP versus lefties is to get inside lapel with your right hand, far lapel with left, and pull down. They will often go for your left hand, at which point you drop the lapel hand, grip their sleeve, and establish sleeve control in your half of the space.

Of course, getting inside lapel versus a skilled gripper can be loads of fun. In which case you get outside lapel, over back, etc. and work from there.

At more advanced level, you combine ashi waza, movement, and gripping in different orders and in different combinations to penetrate their grip defense, establish the grip you want, and throw.

Define inside lapel?

BKR
6/09/2017 5:27pm,
Forward throw to Ouchi Gari is kinda my go to. So I will kuzushi in and if they pull back or hip check I will Ouchi Gari. I do the drop version of it. If they are still standing at that point I generally switch to "wrestle-jitsu" and I will spam single legs and half guard pulls to single legs and sweeps.

That makes sense. Most grapplers have to be specifically trained not to over-react to a forward throw attack or feint.

The normal version of Ouchi Gari for judo competition goes all the way to the ground as well, transition to pin a couple of different ways, although we can't do e the leg-grab version in competition anymore (where you grab the same leg you attack with your leg). Jimmy Pedro was well known for that one (hint, it's from wrestling, LOL).


I train and drill my students to transition choke, pin, or armbar as case may be from all throws, when training for competition.

Depending on how they react after you try the ouchi to the rear quadrant, you can continue to another ashi waza (Kouchi Gari or De Ashi Barai or Kosoto Gari/Gake), back to Uchi Mata or another throw, or to a Sumi Gaeshi, or maybe even get an over the back (Georgian) type grip.

You might look up what's called the "Twitch"...you can feint hard to the front and switch to the rear, either a Kosoto Gari/Gake or your favorite, Tani Otoshi.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1qNiAiAZCs

This one is classics, left vs right, condition opponent with one Uchi Mata that was probably not expected to work, then twitch and switch.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALlnBG8FKAE

BKR
6/09/2017 5:36pm,
Define inside lapel?

Your lapel grip is inside of his lapel grip. If you are a righty, then you have your right hand grip on his left collar, his left hand grip on your right collar, but outside of your arm.

Same as pummeling inside without jacket, basically.

This is the basics of what I'm writing about. It's SOP in Judo grip fighting for opposite side gripping (postures) (kenka yotsu in Japanese).

Bonus, you want to make sure your lapel grip on the collar is level or a little higher than your own shoulder, and that your elbow is down. In general, you want it on their collar bone or in the pocket above their collar bone. and to be annoying as hell, but a tough grappler wont' really notice that part much. But be careful not to put more than half your weight on your front foot. From there, you can more easily control the space.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aK7zbCS6H1k