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BKR
4/27/2017 6:41pm,
I am posting these for discussion/questions. These are some of the better one's I've found that go over fundamentals. They are not in English, go figure. But watch them anyway.

These sorts of things are some of the fundamentals of movement for grappling, particularly in a jacket.

Feel free to comment or add videos for discussion.
Mods, if you want to move this to basic grappling section, feel free, and I'm not adverse to non-jacket wrestling videos.

Kumi Kata (gripping)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2lSKGc60mg

Tai Sabaki (linked to tsurikiomi/kuzushi...)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMNm4uXPOUk&list=PLhHTl2hQkxP7C7nXABUDLKrl36T9qafRe

Kuzushi (tsurikomi)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfNFjoDuZmU&spfreload=1

Nage Waza Concepts

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19daylxmddo

BKR
4/28/2017 7:26pm,
Koga, a brilliant example of rock solid fundamentals applied to highest levels of Judo.

Not only that, he is good pedagogically as well. An often rare combination.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwOuZhSXjqY

MisterMR
6/10/2017 11:27am,
I am posting these for discussion/questions. These are some of the better one's I've found that go over fundamentals. They are not in English, go figure. But watch them anyway.

These sorts of things are some of the fundamentals of movement for grappling, particularly in a jacket.

Feel free to comment or add videos for discussion.

[...]

Tai Sabaki (linked to tsurikiomi/kuzushi...)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMNm4uXPOUk&list=PLhHTl2hQkxP7C7nXABUDLKrl36T9qafRe



Generally the tai sabaki step to enter in seoi nage is explained as a semicircular forward movement of the right leg, followed by a semicircular backward movement of the left leg.
But in this video, the movement of the right leg is almost imperceptible, while that of the left leg is much larger, so that tory stays quite distant from uke and has a lot of pulling space.

This is also the way tai sabaki is done in most of the other videos, excluded Koga when he enters in kenka yotsu (in fact in the videos there are a lot of hikidashi entries).

I note this because it is some months that my instructor is saying that we all enter too close to uke so that we end up without "pulling space".

Falenay
9/25/2017 3:53am,
Generally the tai sabaki step to enter in seoi nage is explained as a semicircular forward movement of the right leg, followed by a semicircular backward movement of the left leg.
But in this video, the movement of the right leg is almost imperceptible, while that of the left leg is much larger, so that tory stays quite distant from uke and has a lot of pulling space.

This is also the way tai sabaki is done in most of the other videos, excluded Koga when he enters in kenka yotsu (in fact in the videos there are a lot of hikidashi entries).

I note this because it is some months that my instructor is saying that we all enter too close to uke so that we end up without "pulling space".
Kinda necroing, but want to add three things to this:

First, yes, space is king. Noticed Koga fully extending his arms in most of the uchi-komi? That space is where momentum is built up and kuzushi and tsukuri take place. It is what makes throws powerful and reduces the amount of body strength needed, as you can accelerate your hips (absolutely and in relation to the rest of your body parts, where the vectors can be quite different from technique to technique) and get yourself behind the throw - literally. A setup without this space is only possible for some specific entries, which brings me to

Second, Koga developed a (back-then) quite unique way of setting up and going into the throw (copied e.g. with quite the success by Iliadis): He steps behind the opponent being between his legs, not just under him, in kenka yotsu. This is what gives him the space that seems to be missing. Very similar mechanics to a drop seoi nage, but with more contact/control. This is what makes this variant so strong. You have to be able to stand/hold this version, though, which can be quite hard. And stepping in this deep is a psychological thing and involves some overcoming of instincts as you completely give up your own balance for the brink of a moment. It needs a lot of training and polishing to master this entry, much more than dropping.

Third, I hate this whole "pulling" terminology. The space is not primarily for pulling (see first point). Recently, I was quite annoyed by a Gracie JJ guy claiming that Judoka force kuzushi all the time, like, with brute strength - and that his striking/kicking kuzushi was oh-so superiour. Frankly, the setup of a throw should break the opponent's balance with relatively low effort, using all of your body, so that you can use the natural reaction to this and do not have to pull much for the actual throw. This is what they are doing, moving all of their body into/away from uke to provoke a reaction. As I mentioned above, the space is for kuzushi, yes, but it is the space uke needs for his natural reaction so that you can actually use it and put your small contribution on top, which multiplies as you also have the space to use the momentum of all your body you moved in there into the very same direction. That is ju/jiu.

Edit: ...regarding the last point: Everyone having sparred with very good players will know what I mean when saying that it can annoy the hell out of you if you try to set up a throw over and over again... and the guy/girl just ends up stable and balanced before you can even move. If you try to force your throw in these situations by "pulling", you are doomed to fail. This is why matches between equally good players are so boring as well: When there are no reactions or mistakes you can make use of, there is no way to throw. Pulling only works when you're a much bigger guy.

BKR
9/25/2017 4:01pm,
Kinda necroing, but want to add three things to this:

First, yes, space is king. Noticed Koga fully extending his arms in most of the uchi-komi? That space is where momentum is built up and kuzushi and tsukuri take place. It is what makes throws powerful and reduces the amount of body strength needed, as you can accelerate your hips (absolutely and in relation to the rest of your body parts, where the vectors can be quite different from technique to technique) and get yourself behind the throw - literally. A setup without this space is only possible for some specific entries, which brings me to

Second, Koga developed a (back-then) quite unique way of setting up and going into the throw (copied e.g. with quite the success by Iliadis): He steps behind the opponent being between his legs, not just under him, in kenka yotsu. This is what gives him the space that seems to be missing. Very similar mechanics to a drop seoi nage, but with more contact/control. This is what makes this variant so strong. You have to be able to stand/hold this version, though, which can be quite hard. And stepping in this deep is a psychological thing and involves some overcoming of instincts as you completely give up your own balance for the brink of a moment. It needs a lot of training and polishing to master this entry, much more than dropping.

Third, I hate this whole "pulling" terminology. The space is not primarily for pulling (see first point). Recently, I was quite annoyed by a Gracie JJ guy claiming that Judoka force kuzushi all the time, like, with brute strength - and that his striking/kicking kuzushi was oh-so superiour. Frankly, the setup of a throw should break the opponent's balance with relatively low effort, using all of your body, so that you can use the natural reaction to this and do not have to pull much for the actual throw. This is what they are doing, moving all of their body into/away from uke to provoke a reaction. As I mentioned above, the space is for kuzushi, yes, but it is the space uke needs for his natural reaction so that you can actually use it and put your small contribution on top, which multiplies as you also have the space to use the momentum of all your body you moved in there into the very same direction. That is ju/jiu.

Edit: ...regarding the last point: Everyone having sparred with very good players will know what I mean when saying that it can annoy the hell out of you if you try to set up a throw over and over again... and the guy/girl just ends up stable and balanced before you can even move. If you try to force your throw in these situations by "pulling", you are doomed to fail. This is why matches between equally good players are so boring as well: When there are no reactions or mistakes you can make use of, there is no way to throw. Pulling only works when you're a much bigger guy.

Doing a true "Koga style" Seoi Nage isn't for the faint of heart. You also need to have very strong lower body and back, even if you do the entry correctly.

Pulling is a pet peeve of mine, especially with arm/upper back strength alone.

Don't worry about the Gracie marketing stuff, it's just that.

I was just working on hips and accelerating them, and space, with students last week. It's funny how just a few inches at most and positioning make a definitive difference in effectiveness.

I think they now might get while I tell them to quit giving their uke the "butt"...

On the whole going under and behind uke, yeah, that's a different and more difficult form of entry/tsukuri than turning in space between uke and tori. I think people see it, and try it, and screw it up (because it's more difficult), so we see people backing into uke and lifting (think white belt doing O Goshi) all the time instead of turning in front into the space, where the space will naturally close and contact can be made, depending on the particular throw being done.

Going in and under/behind is legit, but not the easiest method.

Falenay
9/28/2017 4:40am,
Doing a true "Koga style" Seoi Nage isn't for the faint of heart. You also need to have very strong lower body and back, even if you do the entry correctly.

Pulling is a pet peeve of mine, especially with arm/upper back strength alone.

Don't worry about the Gracie marketing stuff, it's just that.

I was just working on hips and accelerating them, and space, with students last week. It's funny how just a few inches at most and positioning make a definitive difference in effectiveness.

I think they now might get while I tell them to quit giving their uke the "butt"...

On the whole going under and behind uke, yeah, that's a different and more difficult form of entry/tsukuri than turning in space between uke and tori. I think people see it, and try it, and screw it up (because it's more difficult), so we see people backing into uke and lifting (think white belt doing O Goshi) all the time instead of turning in front into the space, where the space will naturally close and contact can be made, depending on the particular throw being done.

Going in and under/behind is legit, but not the easiest method.
Yep, 100% agreement here. Btw, as for finding the distance and placing your feet, posture, and all those basics, there is another great video by Koga:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zL6zh3EWsNA

Love this one, as it sums up most of the beginner's mistakes (butt-bumping excluded ;) ).

BKR
9/28/2017 6:10pm,
Yep, 100% agreement here. Btw, as for finding the distance and placing your feet, posture, and all those basics, there is another great video by Koga:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zL6zh3EWsNA

Love this one, as it sums up most of the beginner's mistakes (butt-bumping excluded ;) ).

Yes, Koga does good didactic videos, and addresses common mistakes. I think though that as experienced instructors, we notice that, but most beginners/novices (or even higher) level will want to focus on doing 'Koga-style' Seoi Nage et al.

I found a good one by Nomura (the younger) on Seoi Nage yesterday. Action-reaction is where it's at...

It's also in an interesting format, to say the least. There is a ****-ton of information in this one video, to say the least. Including what most folks will miss, the training method.

Both are being uke, but not a limp go-ahead-and-throw-me uke, they are giving sufficient and realistic resistance to test the process to make it realistic.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jg3Vj5jUb3w

BKR
9/28/2017 6:24pm,
2004 Olympics (leg grabs still allowed), 5 matches, 4 ippon (in less than total of 1 5 minute match time), and won by wazari in finals against defensive Georgian...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TzPPKu2Yx90