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mrtnira
3/10/2017 10:19pm,
https://www.scribd.com/document/341544752/Razvedka-Soviet-army-scout-close-combat-fighting-forms-Moscow-1988-from-originals

This is from a 1988 manual for scouts (razvedka) and there were four forms (kata): Two open hand forms, one knife form, and a bayonet form. The illustrations are clearly expressed and show a shadow figure as the opponent which helps to clarify the intention of the form and give an idea of motion from one posture to the next.

Military history is a wonderful study. I hope you enjoy it.

BKR
3/10/2017 10:30pm,
https://www.scribd.com/document/341544752/Razvedka-Soviet-army-scout-close-combat-fighting-forms-Moscow-1988-from-originals

This is from a 1988 manual for scouts (razvedka) and there were four forms (kata): Two open hand forms, one knife form, and a bayonet form. The illustrations are clearly expressed and show a shadow figure as the opponent which helps to clarify the intention of the form and give an idea of motion from one posture to the next.

Military history is a wonderful study. I hope you enjoy it.

I got the message this document has been removed from scribd.

mrtnira
3/10/2017 10:37pm,
Thanks for the note. I'll contact them and ask why.

mrtnira
3/15/2017 7:14pm,
Okay. The link is now operative. How a scan from a historical original gets pulled minutes after submission is beyond me, but it happened.
https://www.scribd.com/document/341544752/Razvedka-Soviet-army-scout-close-combat-fighting-forms-Moscow-1988-from-originals

itwasntme
3/15/2017 9:39pm,
do you know what style(s) their military used during this time period?

mrtnira
3/15/2017 10:01pm,
So... I'm an armchair historian. I do have a degree in history, used to work in a library, and was looking at the personal combat methods of security services and militaries in the 20th century as a hobby for about 20 years on and off now. If other people have better knowledge, please join the discussion. The important point is for the information to be right.

My opinions and estimates are based upon my own reading, and the pursuit of original documents. You can find all kinds of high quality scans of Soviet-era manuals at http://www.twirpx.com/. Twirpx is a Russian on-line archive. You may need an on-line translator like the one in Google or Yahoo's Babelfish.

From documents I've looked at, the method of personal combat for the Soviet armed forces and police forces from about the 1920s to the 1970s was a combination of standard boxing, wrestling, and military or police jiu-jitsu. The forms were common across Western police and militaries. The Soviet Sambo system combined the Asian and Western standard techniques in a synthesis reduced to specific movements selected for ease of learning (acquisition), sustained ability, and utility at the point of use. After the mid-1970s, karate-style movements become much more pronounced in the syllabus and are mixed with past Sambo standard techniques. Karate-style forms training becomes part of the training syllabus for individual and troop unit training at this time. The forms reflect a Soviet internalization of the karate model, and they make their own military version of it. The manuals never lose the previous jiu-jitsu style grappling or knife and gun take-aways. If it worked for the Soviets, they retained that thing and carried it forward. For them it was about effectiveness at the point of use.

Research on combatives was done in state-sponsored institutions, often under cover as civilian sports facilities. One famous one was Dynamo. The Dynamo was a system of state-sponsored sports centers, but it was also a front for training police, special police, and military personnel. The last KGB special purpose unit / direct action manual for the KGB was published in 1989 by the Dynamo... It's been a fascinating study. If you do key word searches using a translation tool, Twirpx is a great site. Also, the Russian Yandex.com search engine sources Russian archives much better than does Google or Yahoo.

itwasntme
3/16/2017 6:38am,
i didn't realize militaries used kata. that is strangely cool.

mrtnira
3/16/2017 5:39pm,
https://www.scribd.com/document/320466691/Soviet-1981-Hand-to-Hand-Editors-Images-Only
Please take a look at this scan. I got ahold of an original and scanned it, hoping it would be useful to someone. This is the images only version, taking the reader right to the elements of training. It is an editor's proof copy, which is the final review before publication. The illustrations show a mix of police techniques, knife throwing, boxing, military jiu-jitsu, karate, Soviet military forms training, physical fitness and body toughening, and training aids. It is a good look at the inventory for the period.

People overlook that the North Koreans were working with the East Germans and the Soviets to develop karate-style methods for their own forces during that period. Karate was the new thing -- right after the kung fu craze -- in the 1970s, and people are always looking for the next and newest solution to life's problems. Modified forms training remains part of the modern Russian military and police fitness regime. The forms are different today, and the military forms have undergone several different versions, depending upon the year/date/period.

Both Soviet and now Russian fitness programs are tiered. Basic training and administrative troops receive basic personal defense skills training, infantry and other combat arms receive the basic skills set plus advanced skills, and reconnaissance and some intelligence units receive the basic, advanced, and specialized skills training. So, the complexity of training follows the increasing needs of those specific work role types.

As historian, it has been a fascinating study. I hope these scans are useful to you in your inventory of knowledge, skills, and abilities.

D Dempsey
3/21/2017 9:15am,
do you know what style(s) their military used during this time period?

Sambo was a big one, but a lot of Airborne troops were doing a Karate like style which mrtnira referenced collectively called ARB, short for Armeyski Rukopashnyy Boyy. ARB is still a competitive sport there practiced by the military, and there are a few instructors I can think of, Vadim Kolganov is one. You can find some rules and info here, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARB_(martial_art)