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View Full Version : so after a month or so of adding aikido lessons to my training Ive noticed something



kimjonghng
3/10/2017 4:46pm,
Aikido as I know is a sensitive subject for some. I personally dont believe it's a system that can be trained alone without leaving someone with a crippling overspecialization in most circumstances, but I have found a few things.

1. Since doing it, the relaxation is starting to carry into my other arts, notably my judo is benefitting from it, and there seems to be aspects I can see where the two having jujitsu roots have potential to cross over.
2. I definitely find, despite a signifanct fitness and strength advantage over my aikido classmates (some of them ONLY do aikido and no other forms of activity) that it is possible for me to work up a sweat (not as much as my mma classes but still something)
3. Despite my original estimation, the teacher and other students to put some welly into dragging you around and slamming you about. Its not 100% resistance but its by no means what Im used to seeing online, they seem to go for the applications more than expected.
4. Memories of my old bujinkan days and some technical elements cross over here and there from stepping and stances, but I feel it refines some aspects of the bujinkan I used to know to a better standard (like how I feel the Bujinkan got me at least THINKING about striking before MMA, or THINKING about grappling before I got into Judo). Oddly Im starting to feel the Bujinkan might well be a possible system for some level of fighting if the methodology of training and pressure went up massively.
5. There's been no talk of mystical mumbo jumbo that I have heard from other aikido practitioners at this club.

Will continue to examine and keep a level of feedback. Overall while I can see why people pick fault with the system, I feel there is some merit for me to keep exploring the art for a bit longer.

daishi
4/01/2017 12:39pm,
Aikido as I know is a sensitive subject for some. I personally dont believe it's a system that can be trained alone without leaving someone with a crippling overspecialization in most circumstances, but I have found a few things.

1. Since doing it, the relaxation is starting to carry into my other arts, notably my judo is benefitting from it, and there seems to be aspects I can see where the two having jujitsu roots have potential to cross over.
2. I definitely find, despite a signifanct fitness and strength advantage over my aikido classmates (some of them ONLY do aikido and no other forms of activity) that it is possible for me to work up a sweat (not as much as my mma classes but still something)
3. Despite my original estimation, the teacher and other students to put some welly into dragging you around and slamming you about. Its not 100% resistance but its by no means what Im used to seeing online, they seem to go for the applications more than expected.
4. Memories of my old bujinkan days and some technical elements cross over here and there from stepping and stances, but I feel it refines some aspects of the bujinkan I used to know to a better standard (like how I feel the Bujinkan got me at least THINKING about striking before MMA, or THINKING about grappling before I got into Judo). Oddly Im starting to feel the Bujinkan might well be a possible system for some level of fighting if the methodology of training and pressure went up massively.
5. There's been no talk of mystical mumbo jumbo that I have heard from other aikido practitioners at this club.

Will continue to examine and keep a level of feedback. Overall while I can see why people pick fault with the system, I feel there is some merit for me to keep exploring the art for a bit longer.

Aikido can be some great training. It's just so variable with what you find out there.

Similar to the first people that did aikido, myself, friends, and damn near our whole organization cross train. In a way, out group is similar to bujinkan because we train in nearly all forms of Japanese martial arts. Where I see problems in bujinkan, is distinctly poorly executed techniques. I see Steven K Haynes teaching some judo or aikido technique just completely wrong, and call it ninjutsu. Anyway, we separate our classes into aikido, karate, Iaido and judo (we combine judo and jujitsu in the same class). This way, you train and are evaluated with each style separately.

I'd say aikido is the second most aerobic martial art I've done, with rolling in jujitsu being first. But it's increasingly easy to make aikido either a nightmare of a class or completely physically useless.

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