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Jojo76
3/08/2017 6:04pm,
I just started grappling recently. I find that take downs are harder to learn than ground game. Do others feel the same? I personally think having a strong take down will give you allot of advantage in the ground game.

DCS
3/08/2017 6:16pm,
I just started grappling recently. I find that take downs are harder to learn than ground game. Do others feel the same? I personally think having a strong take down will give you allot of advantage in the ground game.
I think takedowns are not harder to learn but harder to pull on resisting opponents.

Also, I think this thread is not for the "BJJ and Advanced Grappling Forum"

BKR
3/08/2017 6:21pm,
I just started grappling recently. I find that take downs are harder to learn than ground game. Do others feel the same? I personally think having a strong take down will give you allot of advantage in the ground game.

In general, and yes.

The thing is, unless you can train 4 or 5 days a week, it's tough to get better in both at an closer rate. I'm assuming you are doing BJJ or sub-wrestling...and are interested in competition.

If you want suggestions, I'd suggest you work on two "take-downs" that can work together as an action/reaction series, to supplement your ground grappling, and work on transitions from those to control position or submission(s).

If you are receiving instruction formally, then ask your coach/teacher, for sure.

BKR
3/08/2017 6:22pm,
I think takedowns are not harder to learn but harder to pull on resisting opponents.

Also, I think this thread is not for the "BJJ and Advanced Grappling Forum"

That's a good point, I automatically think of resisting opponents, not just learning "techniques".

Besides, the technique is usually not the hard part, it's getting to a position where you can apply it effectively that is hard as hell (against a resisting, reasonably skilled opponent).

Raycetpfl
3/08/2017 7:28pm,
http://youtu.be/n05PdHl2PJM

Food for thought: Olympic Judo Silver Medalist/ American Hero/ Renzo Gracie Black Belt Travis Stevens has Lost to Paulo "I have only ever done a take down once" Miayo in Bjj.The Miayo brothers just pull guard and brembolo and there isn't a damn thing a black belt in their class can do about it for the most part. Gi or no gi they don't give a [email protected]$k, they have a submission rate of like 90%. It's one of the highest rates in jiu-jitsu.

I am a fan of the sambo/ Slavic Judo style of throwing.
http://youtu.be/nTCHR1SAvSk


It takes an insane amount of study to get good at any of it but I think throwing requires that and timing, speed and strength.

Raycetpfl
3/08/2017 7:33pm,
http://youtu.be/aoqoIwe4QB4

Raycetpfl
3/08/2017 7:45pm,
http://youtu.be/YQUYDAipKzo

I think the important thing to remember is, if Grappling/fighting was easy it would be called football and every dumbass would do it.

WFMurphyPhD
3/08/2017 7:50pm,
First, study the various schools of falling techniques available to you.
Japanese Ukemi, common in Judo and Aikido.
Western Gymnastics,
Wrestling roll throughs,
Conditioning.
Even Parkour if we look at what they do.
Then (assuming you are medically cleared for such exertion) commit to strengthen your core, strengthen your neck,
and then learn how to fall.
Practice your falling skills, Practice your falling skills, Practice your falling skills.
You may never get into a fight in your outside life, but you will almost certainly fall at some point.
And then after your instructor (hopefully a qualified falling skills teacher - and I am sad to say that not all "grappling" coaches are so qualified) says that your fallings skills are solid,
practice being the uke who is thrown during uchi-komi.
Practice being thrown, practice being thrown, practice being thrown.
And then, practice being thrown during moving / dynamic nage komi.
Practice being thrown, practice being thrown, practice being thrown.
And then learn how to throw.
When you no longer have fear of falling or being thrown,
you will find that it is much easier to learn throws,
and much, much easier to attempt throws in live practice.
Those who are afraid to "lose" or afraid to be thrown, rarely find the courage to seize the opportunity to perform a throw with with technical follow through, commitment, and continuous attack in live practice against a resisting / simultaneously attacking opponent.
The person with the best Judo, is quite often the person who has the best falling skills, and has the least fear about being thrown.
In fact, most practiced Judoka enjoy being thrown, when the thrown is done technically, and the falling technique is performed well in response to being thrown,
instead of fruitlessly resisting a well done throw, which often leads to injury in both tori (the thrower) and uke (the person receiving the throw).

preschol
4/12/2017 8:40pm,
Here is what I recommend. This is just my opinion.

I am assuming you just started in BJJ.

My advice is, concentrate on your BJJ game, train as much as you can for 1 full year. Only BJJ.

After a year you will have a foundation of skills that are good enough to defend yourself against a bigger stronger meaner opponent (assuming he is not trained).

BJJ is excellent for this purpose. It will also make you tougher so your transition is more successful.

After one year reduce your ground training to one day a week. Study either wrestling or Judo, 3 days a week for a year.

Rinse and repeat with a few striking arts, then maybe some weapons training.

BackFistMonkey
4/12/2017 8:42pm,
Here is what I recommend. This is just my opinion.

I am assuming you just started in BJJ.
.

You are responding and talking to a BJJ Black Belt you fucking moron.

BackFistMonkey
4/12/2017 10:03pm,
http://youtu.be/YQUYDAipKzo

I think the important thing to remember is, if Grappling/fighting was easy it would be called football and every dumbass would do it.

I fucking love the 2:30-ish mark stuff and have nailed it by accident, I had no idea someone had codified and recorded it. I kinda feel feel like I would learn this throw as a counter or something, eventually in Judo. Does it appear in the (2:30'ish version) Judo syllabus? Maybe I am too dim to connect the concepts.

Murphy? BKR?

itwasntme
4/12/2017 10:16pm,
right after position and technique comes intensity. takedowns definitely can't be half-assed.

also, the op is probably not coming back, preschol is a dumbass, and this is better suited for the basic grappling forum.

BackFistMonkey
4/12/2017 10:23pm,
right after position and technique comes intensity. takedowns definitely can't be half-assed.

also, the op is probably not coming back, preschol is a dumbass, and this is better suited for the basic grappling forum.

You know ... you are correct in most if not all points.

moved to Basic from Advanced.

Raycetpfl
4/12/2017 11:25pm,
I fucking love the 2:30-ish mark stuff and have nailed it by accident, I had no idea someone had codified and recorded it. I kinda feel feel like I would learn this throw as a counter or something, eventually in Judo. Does it appear in the (2:30'ish version) Judo syllabus? Maybe I am too dim to connect the concepts.

Murphy? BKR?

Like I am [email protected] chop liver? Sambo style Obi-tori gaeshi

BackFistMonkey
4/13/2017 12:19am,
Like I am [email protected] chop liver? Sambo style Obi-tori gaeshi

I asked and replied to you first you sensitive lil BJJ black belt. They other two were supposed the be calls to old age and Judo experience ...in that order.

(hahahahaha, love you Murphy)

BKR
4/13/2017 12:42am,
I fucking love the 2:30-ish mark stuff and have nailed it by accident, I had no idea someone had codified and recorded it. I kinda feel feel like I would learn this throw as a counter or something, eventually in Judo. Does it appear in the (2:30'ish version) Judo syllabus? Maybe I am too dim to connect the concepts.

Murphy? BKR?

Yes. It is a form of Obi Tori Gaeshi or hikkomi gaeshi. The former names belt grab reversal the latter means pulling reversal. Kashiwazaki goes into quite a few variations of those.