PDA

View Full Version : I've been having trouble field stripping my Ruger 10/22



Wounded Ronin
12/30/2016 1:33pm,
I'm hoping that a fellow Ruger 10/22 owner can give me any thoughts or suggestions regarding a problem I've been having with field stripping.

My goal has simply been to remove the trigger group and the bolt so that I can clean these parts and the barrel, and create enough clearance where I can push my bore brush all the way down the barrel and have it emerge fully before I reverse direction.

I have been following these directions, which seem pretty good: http://people.virginia.edu/~rjs7m/zoot/Ruger-1022-class.pdf

I've had no trouble removing the stock. My problem is that I have been having trouble removing the rear receiver cross pin.

Using lots of oil, a hammer, and a chopstick (instead of a punch, since I don't have a punch) I have been able to remove the front receiver cross pin and the bolt stop pin, but for some reason the rear receiver cross pin has been really hard to remove. I've been careful to maintain the hammer in the cocked position with the safety engaged to reduce pressure on the receiver cross pins, as recommended in the instructions I've linked to.

Just now, I've been tapping on it so much with my chopstick and hammer that the bolt lock pin and the hammer pivot pin actually started to fall out (without being directly tapped), but the rear receiver cross pin just doesn't want to budge. Ironically I've learned to reassemble the magazine catch and magazine release after the bolt lock pin fell out, while still being unable to remove the rear receiver cross pin and complete the basic field strip.

It looks like I'm going to just have to order a bore snake to clean the barrel on the 10/22, but of course I would like to have the ability to do a proper field strip. Any thoughts on why I might be having difficulty with the rear receiver cross pin or any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for sharing any knowledge!

BKR
12/30/2016 1:56pm,
I'm hoping that a fellow Ruger 10/22 owner can give me any thoughts or suggestions regarding a problem I've been having with field stripping.

My goal has simply been to remove the trigger group and the bolt so that I can clean these parts and the barrel, and create enough clearance where I can push my bore brush all the way down the barrel and have it emerge fully before I reverse direction.

I have been following these directions, which seem pretty good: http://people.virginia.edu/~rjs7m/zoot/Ruger-1022-class.pdf

I've had no trouble removing the stock. My problem is that I have been having trouble removing the rear receiver cross pin.

Using lots of oil, a hammer, and a chopstick (instead of a punch, since I don't have a punch) I have been able to remove the front receiver cross pin and the bolt stop pin, but for some reason the rear receiver cross pin has been really hard to remove. I've been careful to maintain the hammer in the cocked position with the safety engaged to reduce pressure on the receiver cross pins, as recommended in the instructions I've linked to.

Just now, I've been tapping on it so much with my chopstick and hammer that the bolt lock pin and the hammer pivot pin actually started to fall out (without being directly tapped), but the rear receiver cross pin just doesn't want to budge. Ironically I've learned to reassemble the magazine catch and magazine release after the bolt lock pin fell out, while still being unable to remove the rear receiver cross pin and complete the basic field strip.

It looks like I'm going to just have to order a bore snake to clean the barrel on the 10/22, but of course I would like to have the ability to do a proper field strip. Any thoughts on why I might be having difficulty with the rear receiver cross pin or any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for sharing any knowledge!

I don't shoot mine as much as I used to, so I have not taken it down all the way for quite a while. I don't remember any problems like you describe. Maybe a burr? Have you tried tapping it out in both directions?

You might get some thing like Sea Foam and spray it in there and let it soak a while...

BKR
12/30/2016 2:02pm,
I'm hoping that a fellow Ruger 10/22 owner can give me any thoughts or suggestions regarding a problem I've been having with field stripping.

My goal has simply been to remove the trigger group and the bolt so that I can clean these parts and the barrel, and create enough clearance where I can push my bore brush all the way down the barrel and have it emerge fully before I reverse direction.

I have been following these directions, which seem pretty good: http://people.virginia.edu/~rjs7m/zoot/Ruger-1022-class.pdf

I've had no trouble removing the stock. My problem is that I have been having trouble removing the rear receiver cross pin.

Using lots of oil, a hammer, and a chopstick (instead of a punch, since I don't have a punch) I have been able to remove the front receiver cross pin and the bolt stop pin, but for some reason the rear receiver cross pin has been really hard to remove. I've been careful to maintain the hammer in the cocked position with the safety engaged to reduce pressure on the receiver cross pins, as recommended in the instructions I've linked to.

Just now, I've been tapping on it so much with my chopstick and hammer that the bolt lock pin and the hammer pivot pin actually started to fall out (without being directly tapped), but the rear receiver cross pin just doesn't want to budge. Ironically I've learned to reassemble the magazine catch and magazine release after the bolt lock pin fell out, while still being unable to remove the rear receiver cross pin and complete the basic field strip.

It looks like I'm going to just have to order a bore snake to clean the barrel on the 10/22, but of course I would like to have the ability to do a proper field strip. Any thoughts on why I might be having difficulty with the rear receiver cross pin or any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for sharing any knowledge!

Another thing, unless the barrel is very dirty, it's not necessary to clean it often or to the bare metal. In fact, you may notice that accuracy is much less out of a clean to metal barrel. The wax/lube from the bullets builds up to a certain point, and then accuracy stabilizes.

I was told that a long time ago, didn't believe it, then cleaned the barrel to bare metal (after stripping the action as you are doing), and sure enough, I had to shoot 20 rounds before it settled down to shoot as usual.

Devil
12/30/2016 2:34pm,
Assuming you're following the directions carefully, your problem is your chopstick, homie. You just need to get a proper punch and hit that bitch hard and clean one time.

BKR
12/30/2016 2:47pm,
Assuming you're following the directions carefully, your problem is your chopstick, homie. You just need to get a proper punch and hit that bitch hard and clean one time.

Yeah, LOL, I thought that but for some reason didn't mention it.

The trigger group is fun to take apart and put back together...

Devil
12/30/2016 2:49pm,
You think you're hitting it hard because the other pins fell out, but you're not. It's normal for the pins to come out easily. If you were hitting it hard, your chopstick would break. Your pin is stuck, for whatever reason. Very common. Just hit it harder.

Nutcracker, sweet
12/30/2016 3:10pm,
Assuming you're following the directions carefully, your problem is your chopstick, homie. You just need to get a proper punch and hit that bitch hard and clean one time.

Seconded. You can get really inexpensive punches from Harbor Freight, if you have one of those nearby.

Wounded Ronin
12/30/2016 6:45pm,
Thanks for all the feedback. I've gone ahead and ordered a bore snake, but will try takedown again later when I have a punch.

I also appreciate the feedback about necessity of cleaning. I'll be sure not to go crazy with the cleaning...maybe just passing the bore snake a few times is all that is needed.

BKR
12/30/2016 6:57pm,
Thanks for all the feedback. I've gone ahead and ordered a bore snake, but will try takedown again later when I have a punch.

I also appreciate the feedback about necessity of cleaning. I'll be sure not to go crazy with the cleaning...maybe just passing the bore snake a few times is all that is needed.

It won't hurt it to clean it really well, will just take some rounds to get the bore coated with bullet lube again.

I put a bull barrel with a match chamber on mine years ago, and you have to run a brush with some solvent into the chamber every now and then or feeding/extraction problems result.

It's most noticeable when shooting high volume, like, at a ground squirrel shoot.

Cassius
12/31/2016 6:07am,
Thanks for all the feedback. I've gone ahead and ordered a bore snake, but will try takedown again later when I have a punch.

I also appreciate the feedback about necessity of cleaning. I'll be sure not to go crazy with the cleaning...maybe just passing the bore snake a few times is all that is needed.
Stripping any rifle barrel down to bare metal is a tricky proposition. As was mentioned by BKR and probably others, rifle accuracy can be unpredictable until the barrel is properly fouled. The prevailing attitude these days, particularly for precision rifle applications, is to avoid it until accuracy or reliability begin to suffer. If you are into any kind of precision rifle type activity, it is also generally thought that you should strip a barrel down to bare metal if you are switching ammunition or working up a new load, but it is also accepted that most of the people who are experienced enough to do this and benefit also have no problem breaking their own rules because they understand when a rifle is performing as it should (or not).

Examples:

My "combat" AR15 gets all kinds of crap ammo thrown through it. Depending on how dirty I get it, I might run a bore snake down the barrel and that's about it. I really only clean it when it starts to become unreliable, which so far is never. If the internals have been exposed to mud or saltwater or something really unusual, I would obviously detail strip and thoroughly clean.

My precision .308 bolt action has decided it likes 175 grain Federal Gold Medal Match best. I tried a number of other ammunition weights and types, but have since settled on that. So now the next step in my quest to ring steel reliably at 1000 yards (if I'm choosing to follow the rules my betters have written) is to strip my barrel down to bare metal, and only use that one type of ammunition from now on. This means the first 20 rounds or so are not going to be used for much more than fouling and ringing steel.

My "DMR" AR15 sort of falls into a gray area between these two more clearly defined cleaning methodologies. I don't let it get quite as dirty as an AR I'm going to beat the piss out of, but accept that multiple ammo types are going down the pipe. I don't worry too much about stripping down to bare metal and fouling with only the type of ammo I'm going to be using with that gun.

A .22lr gun can fall into any of the same categories, and probably more. Either way, don't worry too much about making your guns parade glossy for an imagined white glove inspection.

Wounded Ronin
12/31/2016 12:48pm,
Thanks for the tips; I chuckled at the imaginary white glove inspection. I'll have to use that phrase sometime.