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View Full Version : What should I do to improve about my two mains issues in sparring



Karish
11/05/2016 9:55am,
Hi bullies, I need your advices on two things :

-Firstly, I have issues to manage my agressiveness when I spar, I tend not to be aggressive enough, but yet I feel like going full berserk on my partner isn't a solution either. Being defensive is ok, I feel comfortable with that, but you don't win a fight by not punching or submitting the other guy.

-Secondly, I have issue to switch between the striking distance and the grappling distance. I, and many people in my club, tend to stay to a striking distance and doing nothing but striking, while Yoseikan Budo is supposed to be about striking and grappling. What should I do or focus on to make the transition?

slamdunc
11/05/2016 10:02am,
Have you been diagnosed with any type of personality or mood disorders? Not meaning to seem condescending, but if you start out with some medication, you could probably focus on your training.

Karish
11/05/2016 10:42am,
Have you been diagnosed with any type of personality or mood disorders? Not meaning to seem condescending, but if you start out with some medication, you could probably focus on your training.

I have some anxiety issues

Savateur
11/05/2016 1:00pm,
How long have you been training, and what level of contact does your school permit during sparring?

Also, do you always really Hulk out when you try to be aggressive?

Karish
11/05/2016 2:14pm,
I spar since the beginning of my training, which started out nearly two months ago. Sparring goes to semi-contact to full contact, depending on the level and the willingness of the partner. In fact, I never went full berserk, I have thought about it (I guess my question have not been well asked). Yet I don't see an other real way to be aggressive. I need a routine, a path to get to the point, something like "if he does this, stay safe, if he does that, go for it". The fact is that I tend not to really go aggressive because I just have no idea when to do it, i'm like "what should I do?" during the whole randori

Tramirezmma
11/05/2016 2:19pm,
I spar since the beginning of my training, which started out nearly two months ago. Sparring goes to semi-contact to full contact, depending on the level and the willingness of the partner. In fact, I never went full berserk, I have thought about it (I guess my question have not been well asked). Yet I don't see an other real way to be aggressive. I need a routine, a path to get to the point, something like "if he does this, stay safe, if he does that, go for it". The fact is that I tend not to really go aggressive because I just have no idea when to do it, i'm like "what should I do?" during the whole randori

What combinations are you trying for most often during sparring?

Tramirezmma
11/05/2016 2:28pm,
Also, you're very new at this. I wouldn't worry about it till you hit 6 months.

Karish
11/05/2016 3:15pm,
What combinations are you trying for most often during sparring?

Usually, I try to kick to disturb my partner, so I can follow-up with punches then gap close a last time to try a takedown (usually a sacrificial throw using one hand on the neck of the partner and the other hand on his stomach, so you throw him by a lever motion, we spend one month to work on this throw)

Raycetpfl
11/05/2016 3:18pm,
...... Yoseikan Budo is supposed to be about striking and grappling. What should I do or focus on to make the transition?
Watch Damian Maia,Fedor, Dan Henderson, Gsp, championship days Rashad Evans,Matt Lindland and Chael Sonnen.

http://youtu.be/-R9o-u4Ygj4

Tramirezmma
11/05/2016 7:45pm,
Usually, I try to kick to disturb my partner, so I can follow-up with punches then gap close a last time to try a takedown (usually a sacrificial throw using one hand on the neck of the partner and the other hand on his stomach, so you throw him by a lever motion, we spend one month to work on this throw)

Please allow me to clarify my question. At this point I am only speaking about the aggressiveness question you posted, we'll get to the striking into grappling transitions in a bit.

As an example, when I am looking for what my opponent's reactions are, there are a few combinations of strikes I feel comfortable and safe using while I try and read the opponent's patterns. I like: Jab low then jab high. Two jabs, pull back halfway and left hook. Jab, cross, left hook to the body. Straight right, left hook, right body kick. Lead leg jab/teep/front kick, jab, right cross.

What combinations of strikes, in specific, are you using to gauge when it is time to open up with longer flurries or combinations? Aggressiveness in sparring often translates to being willing to throw more, longer combinations. So let's talk about what you currently use, and how to get comfortable using those more often per round, and how to extend from there.

Tramirezmma
11/05/2016 7:47pm,
The throw you mentioned sounds like a yoko tomoe nage, but with your hand on his midsection instead of your foot? Is that about right?

Karish
11/05/2016 9:05pm,
The throw you mentioned sounds like a yoko tomoe nage, but with your hand on his midsection instead of your foot? Is that about right?

More or less, it's a shame that I can't find any footage of this technique, that would make things much clear


Please allow me to clarify my question. At this point I am only speaking about the aggressiveness question you posted, we'll get to the striking into grappling transitions in a bit.

As an example, when I am looking for what my opponent's reactions are, there are a few combinations of strikes I feel comfortable and safe using while I try and read the opponent's patterns. I like: Jab low then jab high. Two jabs, pull back halfway and left hook. Jab, cross, left hook to the body. Straight right, left hook, right body kick. Lead leg jab/teep/front kick, jab, right cross.

What combinations of strikes, in specific, are you using to gauge when it is time to open up with longer flurries or combinations? Aggressiveness in sparring often translates to being willing to throw more, longer combinations. So let's talk about what you currently use, and how to get comfortable using those more often per round, and how to extend from there.

That's actually a interesting point. Yet I use simple stuff like a single jab, a jab/cross, jab/backward low kick or jab/cross/front low kick

MisterMR
11/07/2016 10:32am,
my two cents:

Beginners tend to fight at the margin of their combat range, and jump in and out of it. That's because fighting inside the combat range, closer, means fighting at an higer rythm: more strikes, from more veried angles, etc.

I think that you can wait a bit more since you just started, but if you really want to get to throwing range, try moving forward on every attack and think that, when you clinch your opponent, he can't punch you anymore: think to the clinch as one form of defence.
Then from the clinch work out some throw (you can't assume that you can always use your preferred throw, for example you speak of a forward throw but if when you grab your opponent he reacts pulling his head backward you have to change and use some throw that slams him backward and downward, like osoto gari).

Shorter myself: move forward on every attack and clinch when you are in a pinch (wow it rhymes!).

BKR
11/07/2016 11:25am,
I spar since the beginning of my training, which started out nearly two months ago. Sparring goes to semi-contact to full contact, depending on the level and the willingness of the partner. In fact, I never went full berserk, I have thought about it (I guess my question have not been well asked). Yet I don't see an other real way to be aggressive. I need a routine, a path to get to the point, something like "if he does this, stay safe, if he does that, go for it". The fact is that I tend not to really go aggressive because I just have no idea when to do it, i'm like "what should I do?" during the whole randori

It sounds like you are not experience enough to do randori yet. It is helpful to know something before you try to go full speed/contact.