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RogueManatee
11/02/2016 1:49am,
So now that my shoulder is getting better I'm thinking of ramping up my training, but am a bit concerned about overtraining since I hear it like the damn boogyman. Anyway the routine would be stronglifts 5x5 mon-wed-sat, judo Tuesday and Friday, sprint and abs and neck on Thursday and Sunday. Just wondering if this may mess up my progress and if this should be rescheduled. Also if anyone could help me on figuring out set times/distance as a novice runner for sprints (I have **** cardio atm.) Also will I make real progress going 2x a week to judo or am I wasting my time? With college and my ever present laziness it gets tough to balance everything.

scipio
11/02/2016 6:58am,
Just remember if you are doing stronglifts you will squat every time you go to the gym. As you increase the weight you legs require plenty of time to recover so factor this in. If you are sprinting on your "off days" your legs may not fully recover. Plus I hear judo is also heavy on your legs.....

Are you planning on doing many accessory lifts alongside stronglifts? Mehdi recommends doing a few dips/chinups or a few bicep curls

submessenger
11/02/2016 7:04am,
That schedule is a bit aggressive for coming off an injury. What does your current schedule look like?

scipio
11/02/2016 8:55am,
To expand on my earlier post, as you have probably gathered I have done StrongLifts. I stopped about 2 weeks ago after just under three months. My reason for doing it was I always thought it was a sound strength program plus I had no running events in the calendar so I could concentrate on it over the UK autumn and winter.

Just as an aside, I’m over 50 but pretty fit, I run, cycle, MA’s and a 4 day split weight program.

My heaviest squat prior to doing StrongLifts was 90kg (about 190 pounds).

One of things about StrongLifts is that you start much lighter than your personal best and slowly increase the weight each time you go to the gym concentrating on good form. I started light and got to 120kg (about 250lb’s) for my squat (130kg for my deadlift)

I’ve seen some real gains and am seriously addicted to doing squats (which is great ‘cos you end up doing a **** load of them with a strength training program).

There are some downsides/considerations to doing StrongLifts (or a similar strength program)
• At the start it is deceptively easy. You are lifting a light bar and it is frankly a piece of piss. You get looks from other gym users wondering why you are lifting so light. However, within a couple of months when you have some serious weight on the bar you start to realise that this is a very challenging workout that is very tough on your body. Due to this….
• You need your recovery time after a gym day which makes it very difficult to doing anything other than StrongLifts. There is no way you could go for a run on your “off days” as your body (and especially your legs) wouldn’t recover. As for doing an MA (like Judo) you are going to struggle.
• Your form needs to constantly monitored and reviewed. You can have sloppy technique when you are deadlifting 40kg but if you have sloppy technique and you are lifting 140kg you are going to seriously **** yourself up

Overall I enjoyed it and never intended it to be a long term form of training (I miss my running and cycling too much). The reason I stopped (I did intend to go further probably using a follow on program like Mad Cow) was that my knees got seriously fucked. After 30 years of running, cycling and a bit of MA’s I have seriously dodgy knees and squatting three days a week has knackered my knees.

I’m now back on gentle running and mainly an upper body lifting routine.

After my long rambling post, my suggestion to RogueManatee is be careful with the workout you are suggesting. StrongLift’s once you get onto heavier weights will put a huge strain on your body and combining it with Judo and sprinting will be very difficult especially if you are recovering.

I would suggest speaking to a fitness professional and explain what you are looking for (and your injuries) and come up with a sensible program. Also speak to your doctor.

submessenger
11/02/2016 9:17am,
I'll riff of scipio a bit, here. StrongLifts is a good program. I've used it, and I intend to get back on it, someday. One of things about the program -or any program- that you need to be aware of is that they are progressive. Sounds like a big "no duh," I know. Set a goal, and when you reach that goal you can shift into maintenance mode (i.e. staying at the same weight, intentionally), or decide to set a higher goal. When I was on StrongLifts, I had no goal, it was the pursuit of the next level that drove me. When I restart it, I'm going to shoot for a plateau. I'm not looking to be the next Arnold.

Also, the 5x5 program is just the start. If you want to go further, Mehdi has I think 2 other routines.

Also, I've said this in other threads, I highly recommend you get the official app - Mehdi has Android and iOS versions (https://stronglifts.com/apps/), now.

scipio
11/02/2016 9:35am,
I think that's a good point. My goal from StrongLifts (and follow on programs) was to get to squatting around 180kg before I moved back to a more split training program (and running etc). Just a shame my knees didn't last the course...

Realistically I think there is probably a limit in how far you can go with program like this. Eventually the regular increments get to the stage where you are pushing the human form to the limits of what it can lift. You have to bear in mind where strength training programs come from, they are designed for weightlifting up to Olympic level. It all depends on how far you want to go.

RogueManatee
11/02/2016 10:31am,
That schedule is a bit aggressive for coming off an injury. What does your current schedule look like?

my current schedule has been a bit fucked. no judo but barbell squats 2-3 times a week and ab stuff those same days pretty much. before injury I was lifting three times a week and doing judo once or twice a week. I have that sprinting in there because my cardio is utter trash and I gas in class judo randori half the time, and I have to lift because I'm really light. Any changes you'd recommend?

scipio
11/02/2016 10:38am,
If you want to go down the StrongLifts route then I'd drop sprints (assuming running) for sprinting on the static cycle, less strain on the legs than running. Cardio doesn't have to be running.

Again, be aware of strains on your body especially if recovering.

Have you thought about dropping judo for three months and getting yourself fit and healthy first? If you are recovering from a dodgy shoulder getting dropped on it on a regular basis isn't going to help.

BKR
11/02/2016 10:42am,
my current schedule has been a bit fucked. no judo but barbell squats 2-3 times a week and ab stuff those same days pretty much. before injury I was lifting three times a week and doing judo once or twice a week. I have that sprinting in there because my cardio is utter trash and I gas in class judo randori half the time, and I have to lift because I'm really light. Any changes you'd recommend?

So, this is going to be a bit of a different take on your situation.

It sounds like you need to work more on your cardio than getting stronger, at least at first. I'm assuming you want to get better at Judo as a priority (other than getting 100% healed up from your shoulder injury).

To that end, going heavy on the weights might be counterproductive. Sprinting and doing Strong-lifts might cancel out.

I'd go with the sprints and other types of interval training, get my cardio in decent shape (that should only take maybe 8-10 weeks if you are consistent). The interval training could well include circuit weight training, Tabata-like conditioning (you can use sport specific judo movements as well as a plethora of calisthenics).

That way you won't be wiped out when you go to do Judo. Skill training when otherwise tired from other conditioning is not optimal. I'm assuming you are a relative beginner at Judo, however.

Once you get your wind and muscle/strength endurance back, you could tone down the cardio and go through a strength cycle of Stronglifts or whatever, and probably maintain decent cardio.

RogueManatee
11/02/2016 10:46am,
To expand on my earlier post, as you have probably gathered I have done StrongLifts. I stopped about 2 weeks ago after just under three months. My reason for doing it was I always thought it was a sound strength program plus I had no running events in the calendar so I could concentrate on it over the UK autumn and winter.

Just as an aside, I’m over 50 but pretty fit, I run, cycle, MA’s and a 4 day split weight program.

My heaviest squat prior to doing StrongLifts was 90kg (about 190 pounds).

One of things about StrongLifts is that you start much lighter than your personal best and slowly increase the weight each time you go to the gym concentrating on good form. I started light and got to 120kg (about 250lb’s) for my squat (130kg for my deadlift)

I’ve seen some real gains and am seriously addicted to doing squats (which is great ‘cos you end up doing a **** load of them with a strength training program).

There are some downsides/considerations to doing StrongLifts (or a similar strength program)
• At the start it is deceptively easy. You are lifting a light bar and it is frankly a piece of piss. You get looks from other gym users wondering why you are lifting so light. However, within a couple of months when you have some serious weight on the bar you start to realise that this is a very challenging workout that is very tough on your body. Due to this….
• You need your recovery time after a gym day which makes it very difficult to doing anything other than StrongLifts. There is no way you could go for a run on your “off days” as your body (and especially your legs) wouldn’t recover. As for doing an MA (like Judo) you are going to struggle.
• Your form needs to constantly monitored and reviewed. You can have sloppy technique when you are deadlifting 40kg but if you have sloppy technique and you are lifting 140kg you are going to seriously **** yourself up

Overall I enjoyed it and never intended it to be a long term form of training (I miss my running and cycling too much). The reason I stopped (I did intend to go further probably using a follow on program like Mad Cow) was that my knees got seriously fucked. After 30 years of running, cycling and a bit of MA’s I have seriously dodgy knees and squatting three days a week has knackered my knees.

I’m now back on gentle running and mainly an upper body lifting routine.

After my long rambling post, my suggestion to RogueManatee is be careful with the workout you are suggesting. StrongLift’s once you get onto heavier weights will put a huge strain on your body and combining it with Judo and sprinting will be very difficult especially if you are recovering.

I would suggest speaking to a fitness professional and explain what you are looking for (and your injuries) and come up with a sensible program. Also speak to your doctor.

well I have spoken to a physical theoropist and doctor and they just this week cleared me for lifting as long as I start light and don't do military press. I just wish there was a way to get better cardio and lift, I guess I can't have it all haha.

scipio
11/02/2016 10:49am,
You can be strong and have good cardio but doing something like StrongLifts will limit your ability to doing both (as per previous posts). Look at BKR's post above - good advice.

Be careful you are are not trying to do too much too fast.

BKR
11/02/2016 10:51am,
You can be strong and have good cardio but doing something like StrongLifts will limit your ability to doing both (as per previous posts). Look at BKR's post above - good advice.

Be careful you are are not trying to do too much too fast.

Yeah, it's a matter of emphasis. Anything beyond general fitness requires cyclical training.

BKR
11/02/2016 10:52am,
well I have spoken to a physical theoropist and doctor and they just this week cleared me for lifting as long as I start light and don't do military press. I just wish there was a way to get better cardio and lift, I guess I can't have it all haha.

Not unless you want to be burnt out/injured again.

What kind of PT are you doing for your shoulder ? Anything specific? That and cardio/general fitness might be a good starting place.

RogueManatee
11/02/2016 10:53am,
Thanks for the advise BKR, I may consider that but getting bigger is a also pretty dang important to me. I'm 125-130 at 5'6 as an 18 year old guy. I'm at a pretty big disadvantage here. I'll mull it over. Also to Scipio, I have been off judo for over a month now, it wasn't that bad of a shoulder injury, just a quick partial dislocation. I'm thinking of starting back up in a week or so.

submessenger
11/02/2016 10:53am,
my current schedule has been a bit fucked. no judo but barbell squats 2-3 times a week and ab stuff those same days pretty much. before injury I was lifting three times a week and doing judo once or twice a week. I have that sprinting in there because my cardio is utter trash and I gas in class judo randori half the time, and I have to lift because I'm really light. Any changes you'd recommend?

First thing I would say is maybe you could skip the lifting, for now. It's true that technique will only get you so far, but until you close that gap, there's no point in supplementing with strength. Gassing out is in your head. I don't mean that you imagine you're gassing, I mean that you're overcompensating early in your training sessions - trying to use strength you don't have to replace technique you don't have. This is a form of spazzing. It's a self-correcting situation: as your skill increases, your strength requirements decrease.

Take a rest day or two, in there. Especially if you're doing the 5x5 - the squats will have you limping around for a day, once you start loading.

Plan your schedule on a monthly rotation instead of a weekly rotation.

For running, start small. Do a 10-minute jog with a 30-second sprint at the end. 10 minutes will get you maybe a mile (1.5km or so). Increase that slightly each time. If you're terrestrial, pick a point on Google Maps about 1/2 mile from your domicile, and use the sprint on return. If you're on a treadmill, use a clock. Next time out, try to go a little further. Get a jump rope. I'm not personally a fan, but I hear that a good routine will do wonders for your cardio.

BKR
11/02/2016 10:57am,
Thanks for the advise BKR, I may consider that but getting bigger is a also pretty dang important to me. I'm 125-130 at 5'6 as an 18 year old guy. I'm at a pretty big disadvantage here. I'll mull it over. Also to Scipio, I have been off judo for over a month now, it wasn't that bad of a shoulder injury, just a quick partial dislocation. I'm thinking of starting back up in a week or so.

I was 17 years old, 5'6", and 145 lbs when I started Judo. I trained with mostly black and brown belts. No amount of lifting would have helped me in the short term (several years, LOL). To get better a Judo, you need to do more Judo, especially at first, get your shoulder strong via doctor prescribed/approved PT.

Now I'm 53.9 years old, 5.7", and weigh 70 kg.