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Esamurai
8/01/2016 3:10pm,
Hey guys,


I'm looking for some simple, straight to the point fitness / getting in shape advice.


I'm 37, 5.9, 202 pounds. I have not exercised in 9 years (I abruptly stopped kickboxing after over 10 years of serious practice and competing etc - work, job, life etc got in the way). Today just climbing a few flights of stairs gets me winded. So it's definitely time to get back on the healthy living train.


Went to my first ever BJJ class ever yesterday. 1h. Warm-up itself almost killed me, 2 minutes of rolling, or well trying to get off from under some dude, almost made me throw up. Never happened in my life before (I never understood ppl throwing up after hard workouts until today). Not that it's surprising ofc.


So here's the plan: 1h of begginers class of BJJ Tuesdays, Wendsdays and Sundays. I'll just stick to that for say 1 to 2 months, because I feel like my body will need time to recuperate between sessions. But pretty quickly I would like to incorporate some additional light workouts every other days, ideally that does not have to happen at a gym.


I have a super busy schedule, with little time to myself. So taking in account the laughable situation I'm in right now (can't get much more out of shape, no muscles whatsoever other than those needed to walk or lift a beer bottle, zero cardio), what would be you guys' recommendations for me at this point in terms of routine?

My goals: get in shape but avoid burnout as I do it, be in good enough shape to at leat enjoy a BJJ workout, oh and eat better.


Thanks!

Nutcracker, sweet
8/01/2016 3:18pm,
Sounds like you already enjoyed your first BJJ workout. Congrats, welcome to the club. I would say 3 months on that schedule and you'll be feeling right as rain. Personally, I would avoid back to back nights, in the beginning. If there's a Thursday class or Monday class where you could swap out your Wednesday or Tuesday, respectively, that would be better.

Find an off day to jog a mile, or jump rope for 20 minutes, to get your cardio up. Even once a week will help you a great deal. No gym required.

DCS
8/01/2016 3:21pm,
So here's the plan: 1h of begginers class of BJJ Tuesdays, Wendsdays and Sundays. I'll just stick to that for say 1 to 2 months, because I feel like my body will need time to recuperate between sessions. But pretty quickly I would like to incorporate some additional light workouts every other days, ideally that does not have to happen at a gym.

This can be done at home, no equipment nor lots of space required:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOOkQTWy-YA

Streetcat
8/01/2016 5:06pm,
Sounds like you already enjoyed your first BJJ workout. Congrats, welcome to the club. I would say 3 months on that schedule and you'll be feeling right as rain. Personally, I would avoid back to back nights, in the beginning. If there's a Thursday class or Monday class where you could swap out your Wednesday or Tuesday, respectively, that would be better.

Find an off day to jog a mile, or jump rope for 20 minutes, to get your cardio up. Even once a week will help you a great deal. No gym required.

I like what he said...You might try just walking before you jog and increase the distance over time.

Also, I once read a book called "Heavy Hands" which advised walking with weights. You can do many basic weight lifting exercises while walking. I recommend solid dumbells... I gotta lot of strange looks using the adjustable bells lol.

After a little you could resume your basic boxer's workout.

I would keep it simple.

Good Luck.

goodlun
8/01/2016 7:33pm,
After a few months of BJJ 3x a week you might be up for strong lifts.
http://stronglifts.com/
For cardio Wind Sprints are you best friend.
The other option if it is an option is to get more BJJ in.
I will be 37 this month and am of similar height and Weight.
I have been back to BJJ for 3 or 4 weeks now, the warm up still kills me some but I can usually make it through a few 5 minute rolls without dying now.
I would also consider.
Planking every day will help as well.
Might also want to consider this.
http://www.gauntletcrossfit.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/1137579PUsh.png

Esamurai
8/02/2016 2:09pm,
Thanks for the input everyone, much appreciated.

I messed up in my original post, beginners training are Tuesday Thursday and Sunday, so no back to back days which is good.

Regarding running (or walking to start... ugh I'm that guy now!) or skipping rope, on my to do list for sure. Not so sure about heavy hands though :) I'm kind of self conscious when I run heh

Stronglifts or equivalent, wowa, definitely need a couple of months before I even consider that... So push ups will do for now. But who knows, if I become obsessed with BJJ like so many others apparantly, I'll probably go back to the gym.

thanks again

NeilG
8/02/2016 2:30pm,
Do whatever floats your boat for cardio, but do some cardio.

A good bodyweight workout for grappling is the Royal Court, which consists of hindu squats (heel-up bodyweight squats), hindu pushups (aka dive-bomber or judo pushups) and back bridges. A quick youtube search should get you started.

GrouchyOldMan
3/01/2017 3:32pm,
If I were to start a new thread, with but the replacement of a few details, it would be an almost verbatim repeat of the OP, so please forgive me for resurrecting this one.

My schedule doesn't really give me the opportunity to train except on Saturday and Sunday. I realize that back to back training days for someone who is in such poor condition they could donate their body to science-fiction is not ideal, but, my only alternative is one day of training a week, and some sort of cardio on alternate days through the rest of the week.

My immediate goal is to simply improve my physical conditioning over the next two to three weeks, to the point that I can make it through an entire judo class without being on the verge of dying. Would one day of training a week, and 20 minutes of jumping rope, be sufficient to realize that goal?

Any and all input is seriously appreciated. Thanks in advance!

BKR
3/01/2017 4:47pm,
If I were to start a new thread, with but the replacement of a few details, it would be an almost verbatim repeat of the OP, so please forgive me for resurrecting this one.

My schedule doesn't really give me the opportunity to train except on Saturday and Sunday. I realize that back to back training days for someone who is in such poor condition they could donate their body to science-fiction is not ideal, but, my only alternative is one day of training a week, and some sort of cardio on alternate days through the rest of the week.

My immediate goal is to simply improve my physical conditioning over the next two to three weeks, to the point that I can make it through an entire judo class without being on the verge of dying. Would one day of training a week, and 20 minutes of jumping rope, be sufficient to realize that goal?

Any and all input is seriously appreciated. Thanks in advance!

So how many days a week do you do Judo? One day a week? If you are starting from nothing in Judo, not only are you out of shape, you have no skill, so everything is even harder to do.

You should be able to get in 20-30 minutes of cardio of some sort on off Judo days, I would think... I mean, a jump rope, stairs to walk up and down, a sidewalk to trot down, or set up a bodyweight circuit training system (like Tabatas) a couple of days a week.

When I started BJJ, it took me a couple of months of going 3 times a week to get to where I could roll without a break in between rolls (depended on who I rolled with, LOL). And I already knew how to do ground grappling in a gi, so I wasn't exactly a beginner.

That was with no supplemental training, other than hiking and fishing with my family.

scipio
3/02/2017 7:35am,
If I were to start a new thread, with but the replacement of a few details, it would be an almost verbatim repeat of the OP, so please forgive me for resurrecting this one.

My schedule doesn't really give me the opportunity to train except on Saturday and Sunday. I realize that back to back training days for someone who is in such poor condition they could donate their body to science-fiction is not ideal, but, my only alternative is one day of training a week, and some sort of cardio on alternate days through the rest of the week.

My immediate goal is to simply improve my physical conditioning over the next two to three weeks, to the point that I can make it through an entire judo class without being on the verge of dying. Would one day of training a week, and 20 minutes of jumping rope, be sufficient to realize that goal?

Any and all input is seriously appreciated. Thanks in advance!

Out of curiosity how come you can only train at the weekends??

GrouchyOldMan
3/02/2017 1:52pm,
Out of curiosity how come you can only train at the weekends??

It's mostly a scheduling thing. I have children, and the week night training times (7:00 - 8:45) is the window of time that I need to be tending to them. I can grab 30-60 minutes on (almost) any night of the week, but factoring in travel time, going to the dojo during the week will require I carve out almost 3 hours of the evening when my pet people need help with homework, making lunches, and general other kid type things.

My struggle is knowing how hard to push myself without it being too much. Skipping rope for 20-30 minutes doesn't seem like something that I could really push myself too hard with - I just don't want to be "all speed and no velocity" in my endeavors, and put energy into something that isn't going to really give me a return. Also, my 2-3 week goal is NOT to be able to roll with the big dogs. I simply want to improve my condition enough that I can make it to the end of class without feeling like I'm going to fall over and die!

Maybe I'm just overthinking things...

ChenPengFi
3/02/2017 3:12pm,
Congrats.
Some good suggestions already.

Try to make it to class consistently before getting too ahead of yourself.
Re-evaluate in a few months.
Making too many changes at once can be overwhelming and counter productive.
Make sure you stick with the changes you make instead.

GrouchyOldMan
3/02/2017 4:05pm,
Congrats.
Some good suggestions already.

Try to make it to class consistently before getting too ahead of yourself.
Re-evaluate in a few months.
Making too many changes at once can be overwhelming and counter productive.
Make sure you stick with the changes you make instead.

You have just made a bullet point list of everywhere my head is at.

I know nothing about personal fitness at all, so to even think about how to reverse the sorry state of my physical condition is overwhelming.

The input I've gotten has been great - simple and easy to follow through with, so thanks to everyone for the replies!

scipio
3/03/2017 4:24am,
It's mostly a scheduling thing. I have children, and the week night training times (7:00 - 8:45) is the window of time that I need to be tending to them. I can grab 30-60 minutes on (almost) any night of the week, but factoring in travel time, going to the dojo during the week will require I carve out almost 3 hours of the evening when my pet people need help with homework, making lunches, and general other kid type things.

My struggle is knowing how hard to push myself without it being too much. Skipping rope for 20-30 minutes doesn't seem like something that I could really push myself too hard with - I just don't want to be "all speed and no velocity" in my endeavors, and put energy into something that isn't going to really give me a return. Also, my 2-3 week goal is NOT to be able to roll with the big dogs. I simply want to improve my condition enough that I can make it to the end of class without feeling like I'm going to fall over and die!

Maybe I'm just overthinking things...

Reason I asked is that sometimes you can squeeze 30 minutes of exercise in around the working day (something I do). I find it not too difficult to do a quick run (even if you did 15-20 minutes) and over a period of weeks you see some noticeable improvements. It's not that difficult to take 20 minutes and bang out some pushups (or box pushups) ever other day along with some body weight squats/crunchies etc.

I think you might be over thinking it, start gentle, find up what works and carry on with it.

Bar Humbug
3/03/2017 5:38pm,
There's a kettle bell programme, simple and sinister, that is supposed to be able to be run every day if you want, focusing on muscular endurance and some strength work. I ran it for a little bit with albeit light weight and enjoyed it, took about 20 minutes a day to do and left me with enough energy to do judo etc. While also feeling like I worked during the session. The routine is online, so you can get the book if you want, but you may want to look into that seeing as a bunch of the guys at my dojo have been singing the praises of kettle bells for judo conditioning.

scipio
3/04/2017 1:47am,
There's a kettle bell programme, simple and sinister, that is supposed to be able to be run every day if you want, focusing on muscular endurance and some strength work. I ran it for a little bit with albeit light weight and enjoyed it, took about 20 minutes a day to do and left me with enough energy to do judo etc. While also feeling like I worked during the session. The routine is online, so you can get the book if you want, but you may want to look into that seeing as a bunch of the guys at my dojo have been singing the praises of kettle bells for judo conditioning.

This sounds like the way to go. If you keep at it you can slowly increase the weight and tempo. I'm a big fan of kettle bells, sandbags, vipr etc as you can use them to give a short sharp workout that leaves you panting. Keep at it