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View Full Version : Hello, everyone. Might someone explain the bolo punch?



John Q. Public
10/14/2015 4:40am,
I recognize this is my first post on this board; if an introductory post is required may the moderators direct me to this section or sub-section of the forum so it can me made.
I'm trained in Martial Cane Concepts as well as the highlights of the humble dulo y dulo also called a palm stick; fairly soon combat sanshou by way of Wim Demeere & Damithurt Silat (also by Micheal Janich) will be added.

My sparring partner has chosen his preferred route, afore having never sparred, will be boxing. He loved the Joe Louis book (I might have to send a jab then a straight right in his direction to retrieve itů) "How To Box". It really is a lovely book on all things boxing for those interested persons. It is a worthwhile read for anyone interested in self-defense, as is sparring with a boxer; there is no better hitter with the closed fist.

Permit a fool to babble for a moment:
I'm not training in these disciplines for self-perfection; Jesus is my Master so He covers that base very well.
My sparring partner agrees with the idea- we train for the idea of self-protection with an emphasis on safety. (Who funny enough is a weird cross between an agnostic and just-don't-care.)

I have heard from suntukan (panatukan) there is a punch called the bolo punch. While having seen it, and heard it likened to the swinging of the Phillipine Bolo, I cannot seem to understand its mechanics. Could someone explain how the mechanics of a bolo punch works? Neither of we have trained much if at all in FMA or Suntukan. Any pertinent information is most assistive.

Fuzzy
10/15/2015 4:03am,
I've done a few years of Yaw-Yan and they're pretty keen on the bolo punch.

The way I learned it is as a chopping hammer fist, used to smash through guards and catch people from unexpected angles.

Mechanically its similar to how you strike with a stick or machete, so a full-body twist, driving from your hip.

I don't consider it particularly high-percentage and it leaves you quite open when you miss, but its sneaky and it works if you time it right.

Permalost
10/15/2015 11:47am,
I've done a few years of Yaw-Yan and they're pretty keen on the bolo punch.

The way I learned it is as a chopping hammer fist, used to smash through guards and catch people from unexpected angles.

Mechanically its similar to how you strike with a stick or machete, so a full-body twist, driving from your hip.

I don't consider it particularly high-percentage and it leaves you quite open when you miss, but its sneaky and it works if you time it right.
I've heard it described as the exact opposite of this- a sort of loose 45 degree uppercut. The blade motion would be swinging low upward to cut tall grass, not chopping downward to open a coconut. Still hits with the front of the fist. Marc Denny, in Kali Tudo 1, says that this sort of punch was popularized by Ceferino Garcia, although many would probably say that's just a slightly different uppercut. The idea behind this kind of punch is that your opponent sees your rear hand drop and gets ready for it, while you throw your lead at their face. If this phases them, you follow up with the long uppercut. If not, then it was just a distraction to sneak in that lead.

Searching youtube yields vids that are more like what you're describing though.

Eddie Hardon
10/15/2015 4:38pm,
Bolo Punch. Go look at Kid Gavilan. The Keed was World Welterweight Champ in the 1950s. Ali would also occasionally mimic the movement.

John Q. Public
10/15/2015 11:51pm,
I've heard it described as the exact opposite of this- a sort of loose 45 degree uppercut. The blade motion would be swinging low upward to cut tall grass, not chopping downward to open a coconut. Still hits with the front of the fist. Marc Denny, in Kali Tudo 1, says that this sort of punch was popularized by Ceferino Garcia, although many would probably say that's just a slightly different uppercut. The idea behind this kind of punch is that your opponent sees your rear hand drop and gets ready for it, while you throw your lead at their face. If this phases them, you follow up with the long uppercut. If not, then it was just a distraction to sneak in that lead.

Searching youtube yields vids that are more like what you're describing though.

In my research I have derived that same name and conclusions. It appears there are different bolo punches; my interest is understanding the mechanics to defend against them.

My main interest is understanding it so if my sparring partner encounters it he may be able to defend against the bolo punch.
If memory serves most street encounters according to Jas. LaFond's research are with closed fists in the West with the exception of one tiger palm & one hapkido ox hand.

Dave Reslo
10/19/2015 10:39am,
It might mean something different in Fillipino boxing but in "plain" boxing it's as Permalost described, very occasionally when sparring I catch someone with something similar. I would usually think of it as something like a lead long uppercut but looser, relying on the opponent paying attention to the right (non-leading) side.

Depending on when you see it coming, you could maybe counter with a straight punch but more likely just block it like a hook or uppercut, depending on the angle (I should say it won't have the power a conventional uppercut does).

Fuzzy
10/19/2015 11:45am,
Yeah as I understand it the name's used for a few different types of thing. The "western boxing" variant is as Permalost describes (as far as I know) and the FMA variant is usually an adapted stick technique, at least in the systems I've had exposure to.

FMA terminology is crazy though, so there may well be systems that use it for something completely different.

Edit: Having seen some of the Dog Bros "Bolo Game" material, they're all about the upwards 45s, but I'm pretty sure that's boxing influence rather than FMA empty hands.

ArthurO
10/25/2015 8:53am,
Don't know if we talking about the same thing probably not but kyokushin also has a bolo punch that goes up and over the opponents guard when close in the target being the clavicle or upper chest