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View Full Version : Taking a bit of boxing



Gosai
10/09/2015 5:27pm,
So, I wasn't sure if I should put this here or in 'Your Martial Art Sucks' since I wasn't really offering any technical insights or asking (specific) advice... but in the end I thought it more fun to place it here if only because new topics rarely seem to come up in the Traditional forums. That said... some of you may remember my discovery in the Kung-Fu forum that there was a school near me. In the end, advice of the posters was 'Just keep doing Judo' which has proven to be some very solid advice.

However, through a series of events that are mostly unimportant, but frustrating (and have some excellent dance choreography) money and scheduling were an issue for a week or two. In that time, I filled the void by looking for local boxing on a whim and have started going to a gym in my (relative) area that happens to offer free classes in boxing. During the handful of visits I've made so far, I've realized a few things:

1. My cardio sucks. Just... like... really sucks.
2. Boxing is really quite fun. I would like to try at least one amateur bout eventually.
3. My gym also includes a wrestling class that I will have to look at.

In addition to those realizations, though, my complete lack of ability beyond a sloppy 1-2 combo and lack of footwork have me consider two possible options...
I can either keep working at it until my boxing game is sound on a technical level and I've build a solid grasp of the fundamentals.... OR... I can try and build up Tyson-esque one punch knockout power. I think that first idea is probably a more reliable plan.

So... thoughts? Remarks? Criticisms of finding boxing only in my late 20s?
Advice on how to make the transition from 'Complete newbie' to 'low-end novice'?

Raycetpfl
10/10/2015 8:04am,
So, I wasn't sure if I should put this here or in 'Your Martial Art Sucks' since I wasn't really offering any technical insights or asking (specific) advice... but in the end I thought it more fun to place it here if only because new topics rarely seem to come up in the Traditional forums. That said... some of you may remember my discovery in the Kung-Fu forum that there was a school near me. In the end, advice of the posters was 'Just keep doing Judo' which has proven to be some very solid advice.

However, through a series of events that are mostly unimportant, but frustrating (and have some excellent dance choreography) money and scheduling were an issue for a week or two. In that time, I filled the void by looking for local boxing on a whim and have started going to a gym in my (relative) area that happens to offer free classes in boxing. During the handful of visits I've made so far, I've realized a few things:

1. My cardio sucks. Just... like... really sucks.
2. Boxing is really quite fun. I would like to try at least one amateur bout eventually.
3. My gym also includes a wrestling class that I will have to look at.

In addition to those realizations, though, my complete lack of ability beyond a sloppy 1-2 combo and lack of footwork have me consider two possible options...
I can either keep working at it until my boxing game is sound on a technical level and I've build a solid grasp of the fundamentals.... OR... I can try and build up Tyson-esque one punch knockout power. I think that first idea is probably a more reliable plan.

So... thoughts? Remarks? Criticisms of finding boxing only in my late 20s?
Advice on how to make the transition from 'Complete newbie' to 'low-end novice'?

If you're athletic and train 5 days a week for 2 years you will be solid. If you aren't athletic and you train today.....You will be better than you were yesterday.

Eddie Hardon
10/10/2015 1:56pm,
Keep going and you will realise that Boxing is Dynamic Chess. It requires guidance and instruction and an openness to train with anyone and not take advantage of their ability or the lack thereof. Everyone has to start somewhere. It will give you Self-Respect, fantastic fitness and self-discipline. It should also help you to laugh at yourself - or others will do it for you. ;-) It will help your Balance, resilience and more. Enjoy.

Dave Reslo
10/17/2015 11:53am,
Any time you aren't doing anything else, say when you're waiting for a kettle to boil or whatever, practice some shadowboxing paying attention to footwork. Eventually it becomes very natural.

It's funny that you mentioned Mike Tyson. People who aren't big into boxing think of him as someone who won because of his punching power but that's not what made him great. He did so well because of his unpredictable style and his speed, pretty much every big hit you see him throw when he was young is a followup to some kind of misdirection. When you start to move more fluidly and shift your weight easily you will probably find you are able to hit hard enough.

Everybody's cardio is **** compared to boxers, that's normal. In time you will become fitter but will also just get used to the movements, sparring is extremely tiring to begin with too but gets easier as you become more relaxed (you haven't specified if you started sparring yet, some places have you spar from the very beginning and some have you waiting for a month or more).

All the "physical chess" stuff takes more time and I don't know if you can really get a good grip on it until you've got the fitness and the technique down. One thing you can do if you get the chance is watch amateur boxing and see what they're doing wrong, try and pick holes in the way they stand etc.