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Bayonet
4/27/2014 10:10pm,
So, I'm getting interested in learning how to throw hands, and adding some boxing to my Judo skills. There are a couple of gyms here in town that I want to check out, but I'm not sure how to gauge quality of instruction and whatnot. I want something where I'm going to learn some good old-school fundamentals, not something with group boxercise classes and feel-good motivation.

So, what should I keep an eye out for? What kind of characteristics does a legit boxing gym have? What are some tells for an over-commercialized money grab? Do I have to buy anything before-hand, or will showing up in shorts and a t-shirt count?

I'm in the Ottawa area (Canada) if anyone has any local knowledge.

Magpie McGee
4/28/2014 5:08pm,
Three questions:

Do they have competitors?
Are they winning?
Does the coach sport a mustache?

If the answer to 2/3 of these is yes, you're good to go.

Soldiermedic
4/28/2014 5:37pm,
Really the same things you'd look for in a judo club. Except with fists.

You look for aliveness, an active and successful fight team, decent equipment and price point, and an instructor that is available and that you can learn from.

Bayonet
4/28/2014 6:20pm,
All good points. Thanks for the responses.

One more thing. I'm a Cyclops. One working eye, one glass one. It doesn't bother me in Judo, but should I stay away from boxing? Personally, I only want to learn how the basics and maybe do some light sparring with head gear, so I am pretty sure I'll be fine. The better half and other relatives are worried, though...

Is recreational boxing that risky to the eye?

Bayonet
4/28/2014 6:21pm,
All good points. Thanks for the responses.

One more thing. I'm a Cyclops. One working eye, one glass one. It doesn't bother me in Judo, but should I stay away from boxing? Personally, I only want to learn how the basics and maybe do some light sparring with head gear, so I am pretty sure I'll be fine. The better half and other relatives are worried, though...

Is recreational boxing that risky to the eye?

ghost55
4/28/2014 7:07pm,
It could be. In light of that, maybe you should find another striking style that doesn't allow punches to the head. Like Kyokushin Karate.

DubhGhaill
4/28/2014 11:37pm,
Lost depth perception would be a significantly greater disadvantage in striking then it is in grappling.

Bayonet
4/29/2014 8:25am,
Yeah, I guess. I want to learn how to throw a decent punch, though. And how to defend against the same. Maybe I'll just train and stick to pad and bag work. Or find some ridiculously over-engineered boxing head gear to wear.

Ming Loyalist
4/29/2014 10:15am,
All good points. Thanks for the responses.

One more thing. I'm a Cyclops. One working eye, one glass one. It doesn't bother me in Judo, but should I stay away from boxing? Personally, I only want to learn how the basics and maybe do some light sparring with head gear, so I am pretty sure I'll be fine. The better half and other relatives are worried, though...

Is recreational boxing that risky to the eye?

i have sight in both eyes, but only use one of my eyes for peripheral vision, so i just don't have depth perception, no actual blindness. even with my relatively good sight, judo is a much better choice than a striking art.

with an actual blind side, boxing is going to be very hard for you. if your sparring partners are any good they are going to be able to light you up with hooks on that side, and since you won't see them coming at all, you will have a higher chance of getting KO'd.

you could have some fun with it with recreational players, as long as you trust your training partners not to be dicks, but i would be very careful and would never suggest that you compete.

your next
7/23/2014 9:28am,
I checked out a local boxing club (www.like2box.co.uk), ticked some boxes in that its good equipment, reasonable price and a fight team. Checking out a class it is 1 hour long split into 20 mins cardio (push ups, jogging, etc), 20 mins technique (pad work, bad work) then 20 mins more cardio. Is this a usual breakdown of a boxing class? I was expecting a lot more technical work and bag work ?

alfred.wilkins
4/01/2015 8:38am,
This is relative question. It is relative to your life style, mentally etc. For example, if you are poor, then best requirement for you would be to look for cheapest clubs possible. Its wiser to train in shitty club rather than not train at all. If you lack commitment, I suggest you pick a club with people you already know in it. Training with friends will make you competitive (no one wants to be perceived as "puzzy" by his friends) and so it will be less likely for you to quit. Trainer is also important. Some trainers will not care about you so he will make you join tournaments before you're ready. Others will be over-protective and will wait too long. Ultimately you want a trainer somewhere in the middle. Also, It is vitally important for trainer to be ex champ himself, or have trained other ex/current champs.