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baby_cart
12/30/2013 7:51pm,
Fresh off from watching Anderson Silva's horrific injury, I got to thinking that roundhouse leg kicks aren't that safe anymore. So I thought about the chasse:


https://player.ooyala.com/static/cacheable/3280e9e38589d0dbea99b7806328e0b6/player_v2.swf?embedCode=Fxdm1iZzrWLYpyM2AA1qoli7J1 QnvuQ7&keepEmbedCode=true&autoplay=1

taken from:

http://fightland.vice.com/fight-school/the-oblique-kick-with-jon-jones

Problem is, if I'm thinking that way, so must others as well. So I googled how to defend such kicks. No Luck. Anyone here have experience with such kicks? Does the usual leg check work?

Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs
12/30/2013 9:24pm,
Switch stand at the moment the kick has been initiated, it will bring your targeted knee outside the original range of la chasse bas.
La chasse bas is a more stationary and lineare kick, so it's range can't be corrected that well at all.
It's one of the reasons why Savateurs constantly switch between orthodox and unorthodox style.

Chili Pepper
12/30/2013 9:54pm,
Problem is, if I'm thinking that way, so must others as well. So I googled how to defend such kicks. No Luck. Anyone here have experience with such kicks? Does the usual leg check work?

We use that one fairly often, and usually defend by (bear with me, the description sounds weirder than the technique) flicking your heel into your butt. Shift your weight as little as possible, and kick back with your heel into your own butt. Snap it back in front as fast as you can. You can throw a jab while you do it too, just in case.

And an unlovely trick that happens occasionally, is to "dip" with your other leg, which drops the tip of your knee cap into the nerve running on the inside edge of the shin bone.

CapnMunchh
12/30/2013 10:24pm,
We use that one fairly often, and usually defend by (bear with me, the description sounds weirder than the technique) flicking your heel into your butt. Shift your weight as little as possible, and kick back with your heel into your own butt. Snap it back in front as fast as you can. You can throw a jab while you do it too, just in case.

In other words, raise your leg. The best defense for any low kick, or am I oversimplifying?

Chili Pepper
12/31/2013 11:40am,
In other words, raise your leg. The best defense for any low kick, or am I oversimplifying?

In its most basic description, it's a leg raise, but really you're only raising the shin. The upper leg stays pretty much in place.

The oblique kick is a pretty quick kick, can be done at very close range (which puts you in danger of being thrown if you actually lift your leg), and works well in combination with a cross (which will catch you dead on your chin if you are stuck with one leg in the air). As a result, you need a defense that can be done quickly, defends specifically, and puts you back in a mobile state ASAP.

killface
12/31/2013 7:56pm,
This is actually the kick we train the most in xingyi. I assumed it would be pretty standard stuff. Good I know the name now.

So this is good kick? I don't get to do much stand up sparring and when I do it is mostly Boxing rules so I never tried it out yet.

There seems to be some controversy about it hurting the knee. Can someone explain this? I don't want to risk anything in that regard.

baby_cart
12/31/2013 8:47pm,
Thanks for the replies. I am now getting the sense that the usual MMA forward heavy stance is not that applicable in this regard(again).




There seems to be some controversy about it hurting the knee. Can someone explain this? I don't want to risk anything in that regard.

It hurts the knee of the KICKEE by hyperextension. No problems for the kicker: soles of feet and shin bones are adapted to that angle of force(longitudinal). For the kickee it is a veritable host of problems:shearing force to the knee, hyperextension as mentioned previously, shin scrapes if used with footwear(did that to a mugger once). Not good for leg longevity. Better avoid getting kicked like that, hence this thread.

TheMightyMcClaw
1/01/2014 10:18pm,
I throw this kick *a lot*, as do a number of people in my gym.
For defense, it's the same basic principle as a low round kick: block with something tougher than what they're hitting with. In this case, your knee.
As he says in the video, you want to be landing the Chasse on the thigh, not the knee. If your foot hits their knee, you will be in for a good deal of hurt. As such, when defending the chasse, think about kneeing them in the sole of their foot as they kick. It's a very small raising and flexing of the targeted leg.
This obviously only applies when fighting barefoot. In Savate, I imagine this wouldn't really work.

Vieux Normand
1/02/2014 11:31am,
For defense, it's the same basic principle as a low round kick: block with something tougher than what they're hitting with.

I recall this being a staple of KK (and the reason there's so much hard-conditioning and pain-endurance work as a regular component of KK training). It's supposed to make you very damaging and painful for anyone to hit, just in case your other defenses are ever breached.

If a person is in a job dealing with the possibility of multiple belligerents, it can be a very useful capacity.

Permalost
1/02/2014 1:00pm,
-floating foot: quickly step your front leg back and then forward again. This is a standard weapon fighting tactic so we do them a lot.

-sipa: intercept with the sole of the foot to the shin

baby_cart
1/07/2014 8:56pm,
-sipa: intercept with the sole of the foot to the shin

How does one do that? I mean, the attacker has already lifted their leg to kick, how do you get your own sole higher than theirs?

BTW, in Filipino sipa means kick, nothing else. More of a roundhouse or flicking kick. 'Tadyak' on the other hand, is a stomping action, e.g. a teep. The oblique kick is more of a tadyak.

TheMightyMcClaw
1/19/2014 1:35am,
I recall this being a staple of KK (and the reason there's so much hard-conditioning and pain-endurance work as a regular component of KK training). It's supposed to make you very damaging and painful for anyone to hit, just in case your other defenses are ever breached.

If a person is in a job dealing with the possibility of multiple belligerents, it can be a very useful capacity.

I think they call them destructions in FMA and JKD, which I always thought was a hardcore name. It's an easy body of technique to overlook, since pads will mitigate their effects. It doesn't matter whether you block a straight right with your forearm or the point of your elbow when the other guy has gloves on.
The chasse, hitting with an unpadded part of the foot, is quite vulnerable to this. I got my foot spiked on knees a few times sparring the other day, and it made me a lot more hesitant to throw them.

Vieux Normand
1/19/2014 3:51pm,
I think they call them destructions in FMA and JKD, which I always thought was a hardcore name. It's an easy body of technique to overlook, since pads will mitigate their effects. It doesn't matter whether you block a straight right with your forearm or the point of your elbow when the other guy has gloves on.
The chasse, hitting with an unpadded part of the foot, is quite vulnerable to this. I got my foot spiked on knees a few times sparring the other day, and it made me a lot more hesitant to throw them.

"Destructions."

Hmmm. Time for a style-field name change?

Couldn't be any more...um, brilliant...than that one I saw a couple of years back on this forum:

"OWNAGE."

Yep, all-caps.

RealFolkBlues
5/03/2014 11:02am,
We love this kick in my style/school. For us it's the peet cha gi, or diagonal kick. Plenty of good stuff has been said about it, though I would add that if you work it a bit you can use it to good effect against the ribs, so the defense is naturally just a good rib cover with your elbows. Also, you can throw this to the outside of the knee if you work angles and circle out, so be wary of this against your low targets. Pretty much the same defense as against the thigh kick here, lift your leg. You can also try to angle your knee to take it straight, which is a quick counter, but a little harder and riskier. Next to front, round, and side kicks, this might be the one I throw the most.

Nohbdy11
5/16/2016 6:24pm,
So I train Wing Chun is these are actually the main kicks we train. Against an Oblique kick to your legs you lift the leg and use either your knee or shin to parry it to either side away from you left or right or you just move it out of the way. If the kick is coming at your abdomen then you sidestep and parry it away from you with your arm. It's a very effective kick because it's linear, fast, and annoying to defend against(as you might be able to tell, when Jon Jones uses it MMA fighters don't really know what to do against it yet).

WarriorMonk7
5/25/2016 11:27pm,
Check it with the patella. That's all you can do - with a nasty counter.