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ManyThai
10/15/2013 10:29pm,
At my Muay Thai gym we train spinning kicks rather often, at least relative to any other Muay Thai gym I've ever been to. Earlier incarnations of Thai boxing actually did independently develop some spinning kicks such as the spinning back kick (kwang leaw lang, or "deer turns back") and spinning "hook" kick/reverse roundhouse kick (jarake fad hang, or "crocodile whips its tail").

I'd say certain spinning kicks aren't bullshido. The spinning back kick and spinning hook kick can be used, though rarely. They are lower percentage kicks, but I don't think they're useless enough to be considered bullshido. I've seen them score KOs and crowd-pleasers in a good amount of Thai fights.

I've been in fights with TKD and Karate practitioners, though, and they most definitely overuse spinning kicks. They can be easily countered by 1) simply throwing a cross; 2) executing a low round in mid spin; 3) sweeping the supporting leg while they're throwing the kick; 4) moving in out of (in the case of the hook kick) the way of the heel or stuffing the spinning back kick or side kick and suplexing or off-balancing the kicker (I've seen this employed by many Thai boxers against TKD and karate fighters, works every time). And not to mention the fact that even if the kick does make contact with something and doesn't miss completely, odds are its being blocked normally, and in that case the kicker would loose some balance and could be easily kicked, kneed, elbowed, punched, sweeped, etc. This of course isn't helped by the fact that TKD and Karate (for the most part) are seriously lacking in good defensive technique and footwork.

Permalost
10/16/2013 12:34am,
I think spinning kicks are worth learning if your kicking style uses mostly hip driven roundhouse kicks with the shin. Muay thai most definitely meets that condition.

erezb
10/16/2013 1:35am,
Low percentage, but when one lands, it is a very hard hitting kick.

Fuzzy
10/16/2013 3:48am,
Nothing wrong with a spinning back or spinning hook kick, they can wreck your **** if they land. But then I do Yaw-Yan so I'm all about the spinning.

Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs
10/16/2013 9:22am,
Nothing wrong with a spinning back or spinning hook kick, they can wreck your **** if they land. But then I do Yaw-Yan so I'm all about the spinning.

Small Question about Yaw-Yan:

I've looked at some documentaries on youtube about it and I like the distance fighting with the kicks (looks quiet Muay Thai-ish), but not so much the bolo punches (or more the ratio of them thrown compared to other punches).

Does that ratio of bolo punches also exists in in the Yaw-Yan trained in Europe or is it toned down for more traditional boxing due to the competition with Muay Thai and Kickboxing?

Fuzzy
10/16/2013 10:09am,
Small Question about Yaw-Yan:

I've looked at some documentaries on youtube about it and I like the distance fighting with the kicks (looks quiet Muay Thai-ish), but not so much the bolo punches (or more the ratio of them thrown compared to other punches).

Does that ratio of bolo punches also exists in in the Yaw-Yan trained in Europe or is it toned down for more traditional boxing due to the competition with Muay Thai and Kickboxing?

I can't speak for European Yaw-Yan in general, I only have experience of my own gym.

We do train bolos (my coach likes overhand bolos particularly) and I use them in sparring. They're not strongly emphasized though and they're treated more as a technique of opportunity than as bread-and-butter.

When we spar we mostly use standard boxing/kickboxing hands, spinning backfists (technically a bolo punch) using the hammer/bottom of the fist, Thai-style front and round kicks as well as the downward curving Yaw-yan roundkick, spinning hook kicks and Yaw-yan back kicks (donkey kick).

Personally I have caught people with the overhand bolo, but I certainly don't use it all the time.

flatline0107
7/17/2014 5:25pm,
the distance in real muay thai is much too close for spinning kicks.. you rarely see thai do it, only spining elbows cause its short

TheMightyMcClaw
7/30/2014 12:08pm,
the distance in real muay thai is much too close for spinning kicks.. you rarely see thai do it, only spining elbows cause its short

This is also why you never see round kicks or teeps in Muay Thai.

Magpie McGee
7/30/2014 12:41pm,
This is also why you never see round kicks or teeps in Muay Thai.

It's not so much the distance at which they engage, but rather the fact that thai boxers are generally taught not to back up. So the distance you can cover with a spinning back kick will be more useful against, say, a karateka who (based on what I've seen) will respond to kicks by trying to get out of range to make you overextend reaching so they can counter, as opposed to a traditional thai boxer who is more likely to react to you turning your back by stepping in to counter before you can finish throwing it.

That said, if you wind up with a MT guy who is running backwards away from your kicks, definitely spin kick the **** out of him.

TheMightyMcClaw
8/03/2014 7:26pm,
It's not so much the distance at which they engage, but rather the fact that thai boxers are generally taught not to back up. So the distance you can cover with a spinning back kick will be more useful against, say, a karateka who (based on what I've seen) will respond to kicks by trying to get out of range to make you overextend reaching so they can counter, as opposed to a traditional thai boxer who is more likely to react to you turning your back by stepping in to counter before you can finish throwing it.

That said, if you wind up with a MT guy who is running backwards away from your kicks, definitely spin kick the **** out of him.

I still don't buy it. An opponent who's moves into jam you is going to counter spin hook kicks, but he's also the ideal person to be throwing spin back kicks against.